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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jul-12-02, 21:54
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Default Saturated Fats are better for you than Unsaturated fats so says this doctor

Personally, I'm not sure these doctors are right. There is no clinical research to back their claims, but their logic is very good. My opinion is that due to all the trans fat consumption by the public that heart disease and other diseases have soared thereby making this doctor vilify unsaturated fat when it is likely only the trans fat that is doing this. But I like any article that shows the benefits of saturated fats since most of us eat them while low-carbing. My problem with the doctor's advice is that he is omitting the essential omega-3 oils by omitting unsaturated fats. However, they make some good points for eating butter and coconut oil.

Coconut Oil - Why It Is Good For You
By Lita Lee
12/14/2001

In this article, fats and oils are used interchangeably but in a strict sense, oil usually means liquid at room temperature and fat usually means solid at room temperature. However, coconut oil is solid at temperatures under 76 degrees F. So if you live at temperatures of 76 degrees F or more, coconut oil is liquid; if less than 76 degrees F, coconut oil is a fat.

Saturated fat - one that has a small degree of unsaturation or double bonds and tends to be more solid at room temperatures lower than 76 degrees F. Example: butter, coconut oil.

Monounsaturated oil - Contains some saturated fat but is largely oleic acid, a mono-unsaturated oil, which contains only one double bond. Example: Olive oil.

Polyunsaturated oils - poly means many, so this means that the fat has more than one double bond. Example: linoleic (omega-6) acid has two double bonds; alpha-linolenic (omega-3) acid has three double bonds; arachidonic acid has four double bonds.

The following information comes from the research of Ray Peat, Ph.D. and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. References are given where applicable.

I recommend only three types of fats to my clients: extra virgin olive oil, organic or, preferably raw butter, and organic coconut oil. Most people understand the first two but cringe at the thought of eating coconut oil. Here’s why I recommend coconut oil to everyone.

Coconut oil has been used as cooking oil for thousands of years. Popular cookbooks advertised it at the end of the 19th century. Then came the anti-saturated fat campaign and the promotion of polyunsaturated fats, such as flaxseed, canola, soybean, safflower, corn, and other seed and nut oils plus their partially hydrogenated counterparts (margarine, "I can’t believe it’s not butter", etc.) as the way to go. Indeed, saturated fats have been supposedly causally linked to high cholesterol and heart disease, multiple sclerosis and other bad health conditions. I don’t know how anyone came to this conclusion, since it would be hard to find a person in America who has a high saturated fat diet. Why? Because nearly all commercial foods, including bread, crackers, chips, dips, many candies, zero cholesterol coffee creamers, all mayonnaise and all salad dressings, many pastries and ice creams, most dietetic (for weight loss or diabetes) "foods", many cereals, and nearly all crunchy snacks contain either polyunsaturated or partially hydrogenated fats (which contain some margarine and some of the unsaturated fat mixed together). These foods are often advertised as healthy "all vegetarian," "no-cholesterol" foods. Even the so-called saturated fat in commercial meat is partly unsaturated because most cows are fed corn and soybeans, both of which contain unsaturated oils.

Are there any people who live on saturated fats who are healthy? Yes! People who live in tropical climates and who have a diet high in coconut oil are healthier, have less heart disease, cancer, colon problems and so on, than unsaturated fat eaters. Two such groups of people include those from Melanesia and the Yucatan. These people are slightly hyperthyroid because of the thyroid stimulating effects of coconut oil plus a diet which includes protein (fish) and adequate fruit (stimulates thyroid function).

Can you eat unsaturated fats and get away with it? It all depends. The Eskimos ate cold-water fish, high in unsaturated oils BUT they also ate the whole animal, including the animal head, brain, thyroid glands, etc. and got the hormones from these glandulars. This caused them to become hyperthyroid, 25% higher than Americans, and they were classified as "pathologically hyperthyroid" by standard medical definition.

However, this so-called pathological condition allowed them to burn the unsaturated fats in the foods they ate. If you are not an Eskimo and eat mainly an unsaturated fat diet, you may be in trouble.

Now you know why I wonder how anyone can associate high cholesterol or saturated fats with heart disease, multiple sclerosis or any disease. Over the past 40 years, Americans have increased their consumption of unsaturated fats and partially hydrogenated fats and have decreased their consumption of saturated fatty acids and butter. Lauric acid, the major fatty acid in coconut oil and breast milk, is rarely present in the American diet. Yet saturated fats are still being called the health culprits while grocery stores abound with many kinds of seed and nut oils. Many have been told that if the unsaturated oil is unprocessed, it is safe. This is untrue. The harmful effects of unsaturated oil lie in their unsaturation, or the presence of many double bonds, which are very labile and easily peroxidized (become rancid inside the body). Details of this are given in the report on unsaturated oils.

Here is a summary of the health benefits of coconut oil. In general, coconut oil stimulates thyroid function and has wonderful antiseptic properties.



The stability of coconut oil

Unsaturated oils in cooked foods become rancid in just a few hours, even in the refrigerator, one reason for the "stale" taste of leftovers. However, according to Peat, eating fresh unsaturated fats is even worse, because once inside the body, they will oxidize (turn rancid) very rapidly due to being heated and mixed with oxygen. Not so with coconut oil. Even after one year at room temperature, coconut oil shows no evidence of rancidity even though it contains 9% linoleic (omega - 6) polyunsaturated acid. Peat theorizes that coconut oil may have antioxidant properties, since the oil doesn’t turn rancid and since it reduces our need for vitamin E, whereas unsaturated oils deplete vitamin E.



Thyroid-stimulating, anti-aging effects of Coconut Oil

Many researchers have reported that coconut oil lowers cholesterol (Blackburn et al 1988, Ahrens and colleagues, 1957). In 1981, Prior et al. showed that islanders with a diet high in coconut oil showed no harmful health effects. When these groups migrated to New Zealand and lowered their daily coconut oil intake, their total cholesterol and especially their LDL cholesterol - the so-called evil one - increased. The cholesterol-lowering properties of coconut oil are a direct result of its ability to stimulate thyroid function. In the presence of adequate thyroid hormone, cholesterol (specifically LDL-cholesterol) is converted by enzymatic processes to the vitally necessary anti-aging steroids, pregnenolone, progesterone and DHEA. These substances are required to help prevent heart disease, senility, obesity, cancer and other diseases associated with aging and chronic degenerative diseases.



Weight loss stimulating properties of coconut oil - a direct result of thyroid stimulation

In the 1940’s farmers tried coconut oil to fatten their animals but discovered that it made them lean and active and increased their appetite. Whoops! Then they tried an anti-thyroid drug. It made the livestock fat with less food but was found to be a carcinogen (cancer causing drug). In the late 1940’s, it was found that the same anti-thyroid effect could be achieved by simply feeding animals soybeans and corn.

Anti-cancer effects of coconut oil

In 1987 Lim-Sylianco published a 50-year literature review showing the anti-cancer effects of coconut oil. In chemically induced cancers of the colon and breast, coconut oil was by far more protective than unsaturated oils. For example 32% of corn oil eaters got colon cancer whereas only 3% of coconut oil eaters got the cancer. Animals fed unsaturated oils had more tumors. This shows the thyroid-suppressive and hence, immuno-suppressive effect of unsaturated oils. (Cohen et al. 1986).

When Albert Schweitzer operated his clinic in tropical Africa, he said that it was many years before he saw a single case of cancer. He believed that the appearance of cancer was caused by introduction of the European diet to the Africans. Many studies since the 1920’s have shown an association between consumption of unsaturated oils and the incidence of cancer.



Antimicrobial (antiseptic) effects of coconut oil

Coconut oil contains medium chain fatty acids such as lauric (C-12), caprylic (C-10) and myristic (C-14) acids. Of these three, coconut oil contains 40% lauric acid, which has the greater antiviral activity of these three fatty acids. Lauric acid is so disease fighting that it is present in breast milk. The body converts lauric acid to a fatty acid derivative (monolaurin), which is the substance that protects infants from viral, bacterial or protozoal infections. This was recognized and reported in 1966 (Jon Kabara). Work by Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) showed that monolaurin has virucidal effects on RNA and DNA viruses, which are surrounded by a lipid membrane. In addition to these RNA and DNA viruses, in 1978, Kabara and others reported that certain medium chain fatty acids, such as lauric acid have adverse effects on other pathogenic microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast and fungi. These fatty acids and their derivatives actually disrupt the lipid membranes of the organisms and thus inactivate them (Isaacs and Thormar 1991; Isaacs et al. 1992). This deactivation process also occurs in human and bovine milk when fatty acids are added to them (Isaacs et al. 1991).

Here are two of my coconut oil salad dressing recipes:



Lita’s Ranch Salad Dressing


One egg

4 tbsp cider vinegar (try 2 tbsp of apple cider vinegar plus 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar or 4 tbsp of rice vinegar)

1/2-tsp salt

1/2-tsp dry mustard

Spike or other seasoning to taste

Add the above ingredients to your blender. Then very slowly dribble into blender one cup of oil consisting of about 3/4-cup coconut oil (melted and cooled) plus 1/4-cup extra virgin olive oil to the blender and blend till smooth. (The more coconut oil, the thicker the dressing). (If oil added too fast, or oil is too hot,

mixture will curdle).

Then add the following ingredients to the mayonnaise you just made to make a thick and creamy Ranch dressing that can be uses as a substitute for mayonnaise:



1-1/4 cup buttermilk

4-6 tbsp or so sour cream, cream cheese or honey yogurt

Onion flakes to taste

Garlic powder to taste

Salt

Juice of one lemon

Spike to taste or other seasoning

Black pepper

Parsley flakes

Blend until smooth. Refrigerate. This dressing will thicken as it cools. You can use it instead of mayonnaise and can dilute it with more buttermilk if you want a thinner Ranch dressing. If this tastes too tart, add a little honey.

Other suggestions for using coconut oil in your diet:

1) When you make pastries, substitute 50% coconut oil for whatever fat is recommended, hopefully butter.

2) When you fry or sauté eggs, fish, veggies or whatever, toss in some coconut oil. Add butter or olive oil you wish, for flavor.

To come: coconut oil ice cream!


These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Not intended to diagnose, prescribe for, treat or claim to prevent, mitigate or cure any human disease. The third party information referred to herein is neither adopted nor endorsed by this web site but is provided for general informational purposes.



References

Peat, Raymond, Ph.D., From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in Context, Chapter 29, page 175. Copyright 1997 by Raymond Peat, P.O. Box 5764, Eugene, OR 97405. Price including S&H is $14.

Reprinted with permission of the author. ã 2001

http://www.coconut-info.com/coconut...ood_for_you.htm
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jul-12-02, 23:44
Bloom Bloom is offline
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Thanks for posting the great article
I am on Leslie Kentons program and she highly recomends coconut oil. Id never used it before now, very interesting
I also used to saty clear of coconut cream, not anymore
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Jul-12-02, 23:50
Bloom Bloom is offline
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Great link you posted at the end of the article too, thanks again.
heaps of reading
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 09:48
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belfrybat belfrybat is offline
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Where do you find coconut oil? I looked in two grocery stores (Walmart and Krogers) but couldn't find it. Thanks.
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 09:56
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
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The best place to find organic coconut oil is at your local health food store.
HTH!
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 09:58
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MyJourney MyJourney is offline
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www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com

Great coconut oils and much better than the kind you can find in stores.

You can read all about it at their website
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 11:38
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belfrybat belfrybat is offline
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Many thanks -- the website has great information.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 12:17
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CindySue48 CindySue48 is offline
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Articles by Dr Mercola on Coconut Oil:

http://www.mercola.com/2001/jul/28/coconut_oil.htm
(links to others at the bottom or the page)
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Feb-29-04, 12:32
minnat3 minnat3 is offline
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Default UC Berkeley agrees about coconut oil

Here is some support from an article that appeared in the UC Berkeley Wellness Newsletter in Jan 2003:


Perhaps no episode in the great fats debate generated more hysteria than the fight over tropical oils in the late 1980s. Unlike other oils derived from plants, coconut oil, palm kernel oil and palm oil are high in saturated fats. All fats are mixtures of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, but tropical oils contain a higher proportion of saturated fats than unsaturated fats. Before the brouhaha, tropical oils were sometimes used for frying and in cookies, crackers, and other processed foods in the US.

At that time, concern was rising about the high consumption of saturated fats by the American public. Moreover, US soybean and corn growers objected to the competition from imported oils. Tropical oils come mainly from the Philippines, Indonesia, and Malaysia, and they have some advantages in extending the shelf life of foods. Actually, their use was not that widespread – tropical oils were never a major source of fat intake in the United States.

However, as some of you may recall, Phil Sokolof, the angry millionaire and victim of a heart attack, took out full-page newspaper ads in the late 1980s proclaiming that tropical oils were “poisoning America.” (Though no one has been able to connect Sokolof with the American corn and soybean lobby, he certainly served their interests.) He founded a group called the American Heart Savers Association, which along with the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington, declared war on tropical oils. Eventually, the cause was taken up by the National Cholesterol Education Program and the US Congress.

Everybody shied away from tropical oils as if they were, well, poison. Health-conscious people stopped eating coconuts, even refused to go into Thai restaurants because a lot of Thai dishes use coconuts. They also avoided eating hearts-of-palm (which do not contain palm oil!). Now, tropical oils have all but disappeared from the American diet. However, they have been replaced with something worse – partially hydrogenated oils containing trans fats, which behave like saturated fats in the body, except that unlike saturated fats, trans fats actually lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Furthermore, manufacturers are not even required to list trans fat on food labels (the FDA did recently announce that it will begin to require the listing of trans fat content by late 2003).

In 1989, the School of Public Health of the University of California, Berkeley did warn about coconut, palm, and palm kernel oil because of their high saturated fat content (it cautioned about butter, eggs, and steak, too!). But it did say this: “The claim that tropical oils are ‘poisoning’ us is irresponsible, and such scare tactics only distract from more important issues. Tropical oils supply just a small portion of the saturated fat in the average American diet.”

Furthermore, research now indicates that palm oil behaves like an unsaturated fat in the body – that is, it may help reduce blood cholesterol levels. In other studies, palmitic acid (the main fatty acid in palm oil) has tested neutral – it doesn’t do anything to blood cholesterol. Coconut oil also seems to be neutral in most people. Older studies that showed coconut oil increasing the risk of heart attack were flawed. In addition, lauric acid (the main fatty acid in coconut oil) may have some health benefits. In lab studies, it seems to protect against liver damage, and it may even help quell inflammation. Finally, in countries where tropical oils make up a large part of the fats consumed (Nigeria and Costa Rica, for example, or Polynesia), heart disease rates are lower than in the United States, where little or no tropical oil is consumed.

The bottom line is this: Rather than you worrying about the coconut on top of the cake, worry about the sugar, shortening and empty calories. And watch out for those hydrogenated oils (and trans fats) that took the place of the tropical oils in those packaged foods imported from the United States.

UC Berkeley Wellness Letter.com – January 2003
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Mar-01-04, 21:16
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Angeline Angeline is offline
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Quote:
Are there any people who live on saturated fats who are healthy? Yes! People who live in tropical climates and who have a diet high in coconut oil are healthier, have less heart disease, cancer, colon problems and so on, than unsaturated fat eaters.


Here we go again. Isolating one factor among a myriad of other factors. What proof is there that this health benefit is derived from eating coconut oil. Could it not be due to the factor that there is an abundance of fruits and vegetables in the tropics. Could it not be due, rather, to the fact that their diet is not composed of fast food and frozen dinner entrees. Maybe it's what they DON'T eat as much as what they do eat.
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Old Fri, Jun-01-12, 10:49
mariela712 mariela712 is offline
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There has actually been tons of clinical research backing the benefits of coconut oil. Google Dr. Mary Enig and Dr. Weston Price and you can read up on multiple research done since the 1950 up to date on the subject. I have been taking coconut oil for several weeks now and have been loving the results: better hair/skin, weight loss and energy!
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  #12   ^
Old Fri, Jun-01-12, 11:10
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Liz53 Liz53 is offline
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The best evidence that I've found for the superiority of saturated fats is that the body converts excess calories to what? Monounsaturated and saturated fat. This is the body's way of saving excess food for a rainy day - why would it store it in this form if it is unhealthful for you?

Yes, you want healthy omega-3s to offset the omega-6 polyunsaturated fats in industrial seed oils. Eliminate those seed oils and there is less need for omega 3s.

I believe it was the notion of "heart healthy polyunsaturated fats" that was promoted with little sound evidence.
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  #13   ^
Old Fri, Jun-01-12, 12:43
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alisbabe alisbabe is offline
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Fat is a vital nutrient. As well as being a useful fuel, fats are an essential building block of all cells in the body, as cell membranes are made of fat. Nerve cells need even more fat, as they have an extra membrane, called the myelin sheath, which is what carries the nerve impulses. The brain is 60% fat.

Saturated fat is the most stable fat at body temperature so it's the best fat for stable cell membranes and receptors. Sat fats are required for hormone production and boost the immune system.

Most importantly, in the whole "heart healthy" debate, is that saturated fat is the preferred source of energy for heart muscle.

Fatty acid metabolism is the primary source of energy in a healthily functioning heart, because it is the quickest way of producing energy.

"In the well-perfused heart, ∼60–90% of the acetyl-CoA comes from {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids"
Myocardial Substrate Metabolism in the Normal and Failing Heart
Physiol Rev July 2005 vol. 85 no. 3 1093-1129
http://physrev.physiology.org/content/85/3/1093.fu...

"Healthy myocardium uses mainly fatty acids as its major energy source, with little contribution of glucose."
Metabolic and genetic regulation of cardiac energy substrate preference
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Volume 146, Issue 1, January 2007, Pages 26–39
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...

"In the human heart, FAs are considered to account for 60-70% of oxygen consumption for energy production"
Fatty Acid Oxidation in the Heart
Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology:
1996 - Volume 28 - Issue - pp 11-17
http://journals.lww.com/cardiovascularpharm/Fullte...

The process by which the heart burns fatty acids for energy is known as beta-oxidation, a process that is easiest for saturated fats due to the lack of any double bonds in the molecule e.g. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta_oxidation . Burning sat fats requires fewer enzymes and thus less energy. Therefore sat fats will be burnt preferentially whenever the heart can get access to them.
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  #14   ^
Old Fri, Jun-01-12, 13:07
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Liz53 Liz53 is offline
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Here's an entire website devoted to the fact that science supports saturated fat over polyunsaturated for heart health.

http://healthydietsandscience.blogspot.com/

He also has a new book which lists a hundred or so studies supporting sat fat.
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Jun-01-12, 13:20
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz53
The best evidence that I've found for the superiority of saturated fats is that the body converts excess calories to what? Monounsaturated and saturated fat. This is the body's way of saving excess food for a rainy day - why would it store it in this form if it is unhealthful for you?

Yes, you want healthy omega-3s to offset the omega-6 polyunsaturated fats in industrial seed oils. Eliminate those seed oils and there is less need for omega 3s.

I believe it was the notion of "heart healthy polyunsaturated fats" that was promoted with little sound evidence.

That's an interesting point but look at it this way. Beef fat is about the same as human fat, but cows don't eat meat as we do. Put it this way, the most efficient method to store energy has virtually no relation with the natural diet of the animal that stores this energy. Consider the composition of all the different kinds of meat we eat, and compare that to all the different diets they eat. If it's the most efficient means to store energy, then most animals who do store energy would end up doing it this way, and they do. How good our diet is for us doesn't depend on how we store the energy it contains, but on the effect this food has on our health.

I believe animal fat - pretty much any kind - is the best kind of fat for humans. More than that, I believe animal fat is the best food for us. The argument is lengthy but I'll summarize it. It starts with our big brain and our small gut. It's the ETH, or expensive tissue hypothesis. Our brain got bigger, so something else must have gotten smaller to compensate - our gut took the hit. A large brain needs tons of fuel, a small gut is less efficient. The only kind of food that could both fuel a large brain and be easily digested is animal fat. Animal fat is already prepared so to speak into a form that can be used immediately with little effort. As you noted, animal fat requires no conversion into a different substance like cellulose would need if that was our diet, to store it and use it. We simply need to mash it up somehow and make the fatty acids available for metabolism. The conversion has already been done by the animals we eat. Animal fat is the only kind of energy that was and still is acquirable in abundant quantities with little to no processing. Now apply this whole idea over a couple million years and we end up with homo-sapiens-sapiens.

Eating large quantities of refined vegetable fats instead of animal fats would be akin to reverting to an earlier diet, one which we are no longer adapted to. Furthermore, the total quantity of vegetable fats we do eat today represents probably several orders of magnitude more vegetable fats than any animal has, does, or will ever eat naturally. There is probably no animal on this planet today - let alone humans - that is adapted to a diet that contains such large amounts of vegetable fats. That's because two things are needed for refined vegetable fats to exist: Agriculture, and processing.

As we all know from personal experience on this forum, refined carbohydrates make us fat, sick, weak and other nasty things. Since we can only eat two kinds of energy - fats and carbs - and since carbs make us sick, and since we can't digest the fiber within which the carbs and/or fats and/or protein are contained in plants, and since vegetable fats have never been part of our diet in any significant quantities until 2 minutes before midnight, it follows that the only form of energy that is absolutely suitable for us is animal fat.

Anyway, that's my opinion on the subject.
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