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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 05:15
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 22,132
 
Plan: Keto/IF
Stats: 217/192/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: UK
Default US experts reviewing low-carb, other diets for new guidelines

Quote:
US experts reviewing low-carb, other diets for new guidelines

With keto-friendly recipes sweeping social media, some followers of low-carb eating are hoping for a nod of approval in the upcoming US dietary guidelines that advise Americans on what to eat.

It may seem minor, but backers say low-carb’s inclusion could influence nutrition advice that doctors give and help shape government food programs like school lunches.

Currently, the guidelines cite the Mediterranean, vegetarian and other diets as examples of healthy eating.

“The main point is to get away from a one-size-fits-all diet,” said Nina Teicholz, who has written about low-carb diets.

Last year, US health officials said low-carb diets would be reviewed along with other eating styles for the 2020 update to the guidelines.

Backers are hopeful because the panel of experts selected to review the evidence includes members nominated by Atkins Nutritionals and a beef industry group. The group had its first meeting last week and is expected to issue a report to help shape the guidelines by next year.

Low carb’s consideration comes amid skepticism of nutrition research for producing confusing advice. Low-carb supporters say rising obesity rates show conventional wisdom about nutrition, reflected in the guidelines, doesn’t work for everyone.

Some nutrition experts caution that evidence for low-carb diets is new, and that it’s unclear what the long-term effects might be.

They say criticism of the guidelines is overblown, and blame the food industry for distorting messages to market low-fat snacks full of sugar and massive portions. They note the guidelines have cautioned against sugar since they were introduced in 1980, and that key recommendations have been largely consistent and remain sound.

Low-carb diets generally limit foods like bread, pasta and sugar to less than 30 percent of calories, or around 750 calories for someone eating 2,500 calories a day.

The idea of restricting carbohydrates has been around for decades, and many remember the Atkins craze.

The ketogenic diet has been used to treat people with epilepsy and has resurfaced as a very low-carb diet embraced by celebrities.

Charles Garrison, a mortgage officer in Florida, decided to try the keto diet, including food like waffles made with almond flour.

“I don’t plan on being super strict about it forever,” he said.

Low-carb diets can work well for people with type 2 diabetes, who are more sensitive to carbohydrates. But the benefits of low-carb can also be overblown, and people still have to make sure their overall diet is healthy, said Kevin Hall of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Some nutrition experts say sticking to low-carb diets can be hard, and that people should make changes that can last.

Marion Nestle, a nutrition researcher who helped write the 1995 guidelines, said she prefers guidance that encourages healthy habits, such as the types of food to eat or limit.


“People don’t eat nutrients, they eat food,” she said.

Adding low-carb diets could further muddle messages. The guidelines, now more than 120 pages, also advise people to limit the saturated fat commonly found in meat and butter—foods many link with low-carb diets.
Instead of adding another diet to the mix, simplifying the guidelines would be more useful, said Stanford University health policy researcher John Ioannidis.

“If we eat more, that will make us obese. That’s 100-percent correct,” he said.


https://businessmirror.com.ph/2019/...new-guidelines/
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 06:03
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 11,382
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/149/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 101%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Adding low-carb diets could further muddle messages. The guidelines, now more than 120 pages, also advise people to limit the saturated fat commonly found in meat and butter—foods many link with low-carb diets.
Instead of adding another diet to the mix, simplifying the guidelines would be more useful, said Stanford University health policy researcher John Ioannidis.

“If we eat more, that will make us obese. That’s 100-percent correct,” he said.


No, it isn’t. I could eat 1200 calories a day for WEEKS without losing a pound. I ate 1800 calories a day, low carb, and lost weight.

They keep juggling “paradoxes” and confusing themselves.

Low carb works for type II diabetics? With diabetes at levels called “epidemic”? Doesn’t that mean we have a lot of carb sensitive people in the population?
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 07:36
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 9,375
 
Plan: Atkins/LCHF
Stats: 195/162/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 73%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

Quote:
evidence for low-carb diets is new


Can you say Banting? Etc. Is a couple hundred years of evidence enough? Sorry, they hadn't invented double-blind "scientific" studies back then, let alone meta-analysis, but a few million healthy human bodies count for something, right?

I just can't believe they keep saying low-carb is harsh and unsustainable. People who repeat that canard clearly have never tried to lose weight on 1200 low-fat calories or to sustain that for any length of time.

I'm calling Balderdash!, as Mr. Banting might have said.

Back to our regularly-scheduled life.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 08:19
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,779
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
"The guidelines, now more than 120 pages, also advise people to limit the saturated fat commonly found in meat and butter—foods many link with low-carb diets."

Right, I can reduce the number of pages drastically down to five pages. Dr. Westman has had five pages of simple guidelines for years. The first for removal are those pages that advise people to limit saturated fat and any other pages that discuss fats in general. Here's a better candidate for the 2020 DGA:

https://www.dietdoctor.com/se/wp-co...starch_diet.pdf
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 08:45
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,365
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Every time that a nutrition article mentions 'experts', I know that the same conventional placards will be spouted.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 09:16
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 4,450
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
Every time that a nutrition article mentions 'experts', I know that the same conventional placards will be spouted.


I don't trust any article that references so-called "experts". An expert, apparently, is anyone who toes the party line and we all know where those kind of parties got us.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 10:52
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 10,266
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Frustrating.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 11:00
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 548
 
Plan: Protein Power, IF
Stats: 238/214/145 Female 5'9"
BF:53.75%/48.7%/25%
Progress: 26%
Location: PNW
Default

Quote:
Some nutrition experts caution that evidence for low-carb diets is new, and that it’s unclear what the long-term effects might be.
Sure, if "new" means 10 million years of human evolution vs. 500 years of potatoes and 100 years of processed vegetable oils.

Quote:
They say criticism of the guidelines is overblown, and blame the food industry for distorting messages to market low-fat snacks full of sugar and massive portions. They note the guidelines have cautioned against sugar since they were introduced in 1980, and that key recommendations have been largely consistent and remain sound.
When will people get the message that it's not just sugar?!? Also, portions aren't "massive." Research indicates that people generally are following the guidelines. People don't eat like it's Thanksgiving every day. They eat when they are hungry. They just never get full on all those carbs. Arbitrary portion sizes and tons of carbs based on a "typical" calorie diet isn't going to change that.

Quote:
Low-carb diets generally limit foods like bread, pasta and sugar to less than 30 percent of calories, or around 750 calories for someone eating 2,500 calories a day.
No. That's not a "low-carb diet." That's what is called "false low-carb." First, standard food labels are based on 2,000 calories/day, so using 2,500 is a misleading comparison in an article aimed at consumers. Second, low-carb diets are not based on a percentage of calories, they're based on absolute grams. Third, by anyone's reasonable definition, "low carb" would max out around 100g of carbs, which is equal to 400 calories or about 15% of calories on a 2,500 calorie diet or 20% of calories on 2,000 calorie diet. Very low-carb diets (such as "keto," Atkins, etc.) are commonly 20–30g of carbs, but no more than 50g.

Quote:
The idea of restricting carbohydrates has been around for decades centuries, and many remember the still follow Atkins craze.
FTFY.

Quote:
But the benefits of low-carb can also be overblown, and people still have to make sure their overall diet is healthy, said Kevin Hall of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
By, like, you know, following a low-carb diet full of whole foods like vegetables, meat, fish, nuts, and some dairy--the healthy food you get shopping the perimeter of the grocery.

Quote:
Some nutrition experts say sticking to low-carb diets can be hard, and that people should make changes that can last.
Hard like following any other diet to improve your health or reduce weight that involves not eating whatever the f* you want at any moment? Because otherwise it's much easier to follow a diet in which you aren't hungry all the time, like a carbohydrate heavy diet.

Quote:
Marion Nestle, a nutrition researcher who helped write the 1995 guidelines, said she prefers guidance that encourages healthy habits, such as the types of food to eat or limit.

“People don’t eat nutrients, they eat food,” she said.
Right. Guidance that encourages healthy habits like limiting types of food like sugar, pasta, bread, rice, potatoes, and vegetable oils, and encouraging types of food like meat and vegetables. I can see how she might not like the latest iteration of the guidelines, because they do stupid things like refer to "protein" rather than "beef and chicken" and muddle starchy vegetables like beans in with foods like beef, chicken, pork, lamb, fish, eggs, and dairy.

Quote:
Adding low-carb diets could further muddle messages. The guidelines, now more than 120 pages, also advise people to limit the saturated fat commonly found in meat and butter—foods many link with low-carb diets.
Instead of adding another diet to the mix, simplifying the guidelines would be more useful, said Stanford University health policy researcher John Ioannidis.
Simplifying is good. Maybe we can get rid of the stuff that's been completely debunked by controlled randomized trials, like low-fat diets and the advice to not eat saturated fat!

Quote:
“If we eat more, that will make us obese. That’s 100-percent correct,” he said.
That is 100% incorrect.
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 11:28
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 10,266
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Rofl. Thank you!!!!
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 12:37
Grav Grav is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 993
 
Plan: Banting
Stats: 302/187/187 Male 175cm
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: New Zealand
Default

Quote:
“If we eat more, that will make us obese. That’s 100-percent correct,” he said.

So close, and yet so far.

A more accurate statement would have been "if we eat too much," since this is still possible with any dietary approach, including LCHF.

He could also have said "if we eat more carbs," because if this weren't true, this very website might not exist.

An unusual misfire from Prof Ioannidis here.
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Apr-07-19, 13:54
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 13,414
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Ontario
Default

https://health.gov/dietaryguideline...8931.1554666123


Guidelines have cautioned against sugar since the 1980's.... this pdf shows how this was done. By telling people that sugar wasn't solely responsible for caries, and that it wasn't at all responsible for heart disease, artery disease, diabetes, and sort of by implication, obesity.

"The most common sort of diabetes is seen in obese adults, and avoiding sugar, without correcting the overweight, will not solve the problem."

I think you could call this praising with faint damnation.

And there are no numbers give--they say Americans eat 130 pounds of sugar or more a year, it just says they should eat less. 129 pounds? How much a day? How often is as important as how much--since the only thing they admit sugar to be involved in is cavities, I guess that's about that.
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