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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 01:15
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
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Default Makeup of an individual's gut bacteria may play role in weight loss

Quote:
From Science Daily
August 1, 2018

Makeup of an individual's gut bacteria may play role in weight loss

A preliminary study published in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings suggests that, for some people, specific activities of gut bacteria may be responsible for their inability to lose weight, despite adherence to strict diet and exercise regimens.

"We know that some people don't lose weight as effectively as others, despite reducing caloric consumption and increasing physical activity," says Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-senior author of the study. Dr. Kashyap and his colleagues wondered if there may be other factors at work that prevented these patients from responding to traditional weight-loss strategies.

"Gut bacteria have the capacity to break down complex food particles, which provides us with additional energy. And this is normally is good for us," says Vandana Nehra, M.D, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and co-senior author of the study. "However, for some individuals trying to lose weight, this process may become a hindrance." Drs. Kashyap, Nehra and their colleagues decided to test if certain functions performed by gut bacteria that provide people with more energy may be responsible for the inability of some individuals to lose weight.

The Mayo Clinic research team collected and analyzed gut bacteria samples from a group of 26 participants enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Obesity Treatment Research Program between August and September 2013. They found that gut bacteria among individuals who did not lose weight were different from gut bacteria in patients who lost weight. Specifically, the bacteria Phascolarctobacterium was associated with weight loss success, while the bacteria Dialister was associated with failure to lose weight. More importantly, the increased ability to use certain carbohydrates was associated with failure to lose as much weight. "This suggested to us that gut bacteria may possibly be an important determinant of weight loss in response to diet and lifestyle changes," Dr. Kashyap says.

Dr. Kashyap emphasizes that this is a preliminary finding in a small study, and more research is needed to confirm the role of gut bacteria in weight loss. "While we need to replicate these findings in a bigger study, we now have an important direction to pursue in terms of potentially providing more individualized strategies for people who struggle with obesity," Dr. Kashyap says.


Journal Reference:

David A. Muņiz Pedrogo, Michael D. Jensen, Carol T. Van Dyke, Joseph A. Murray, Jeffrey A. Woods, Jun Chen, Purna C. Kashyap, Vandana Nehra. Gut Microbial Carbohydrate Metabolism Hinders Weight Loss in Overweight Adults Undergoing Lifestyle Intervention With a Volumetric Diet. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 2018; 93 (8): 1104 DOI: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2018.02.019


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80801125029.htm
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 07:00
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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ummmm, I had the impression that us that live in this world of weight loss already know the right gut bacteria/microbiome is important.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 11:03
Zei Zei is offline
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Default

I suspect those of us educating ourselves by regularly reading from websites like this one are likely more aware of such things than your typical dieter out there. Also:
Quote:
Specifically, the bacteria Phascolarctobacterium was associated with weight loss success, while the bacteria Dialister was associated with failure to lose weight. More importantly, the increased ability to use certain carbohydrates was associated with failure to lose as much weight.
So starve those little buggers with a low carb diet!
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 11:39
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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If I remember one experient well enough to summarize-- the microbiome can be the deciding fate, no matter what diet is fed.

Much of our microbiome has been deleted. By diet and c-section and antiiotics. SOme are gone forever.

There is a tribe in south america that might offer options as they are only recently discovered , maybe 10 years now, and they have been tested. They have many more by type (species) than North AMericans. If I remember right something like 36 vs 24.

When was the last time a suppement had all 24???? Ass uming all 24 are good to have.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 13:18
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
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I wonder about the gut microbiome differences between people who consume plant material and those who don't. Thinking specifically right now of the all animal food/zero carb/carnivore-type diets, something I'm currently testing. Typical health articles seem to emphasize the idea we must feed a lot of plant matter to our gut bacteria or...what? Do a lot of plant food loving species die off when you don't feed them? And if so, does it matter for health? Improvement? Detriment? Anyone with knowledge on this?
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 13:23
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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There is another recent thread that talked a LOT about all of your questions. I'll look for it later or if somebody else has it marked maybe they can post it.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 13:26
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ImOnMyWay ImOnMyWay is offline
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Wondering why it took the authors FIVE YEARS to publish their findings?
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 13:50
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
I wonder about the gut microbiome differences between people who consume plant material and those who don't. Thinking specifically right now of the all animal food/zero carb/carnivore-type diets, something I'm currently testing. Typical health articles seem to emphasize the idea we must feed a lot of plant matter to our gut bacteria or...what? Do a lot of plant food loving species die off when you don't feed them? And if so, does it matter for health? Improvement? Detriment? Anyone with knowledge on this?

yes.


When feeding livestock especially the ruminants the feed needs a 2 week transition as the microbes in the rumen need to adjust to the change. THe percent of each type will alter. Realize these are only plant eaters. We dont have a rumen but the next best is the small intestines, and large intestines.

When I drop bread and not eat it for a few weeks then eat a hunk with butter, my stomach ache will start like clockwork X hours later. Payment for cheating. lol I learned to take a probiotic as soon as I ate off plan, and that prevented the distressed gut.

The amerian diet is big swings in food, certainly not 2 weeks to transition. Generally better to eat a bit of everythig eat day to keep bugs happy. IMO.
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  #9   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 13:51
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Maybe the researchers were short on the number of publications they must have for that year, and held this one to fill the numbers.
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 15:23
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mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
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Plan: PSMF/IF
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Location: Alamo city, Texas
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They say if you eat beans regularly you won't 'toot'
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  #11   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 16:19
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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I wish. Lacking a specific enzyme was what caused the "toot" IMO, which is why Beano is effective. Have you seen any studies Mike to support an enzyme is turned on??? Eating a lot of beans has not eliminated the "toot" among family members...so just wondering.
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  #12   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 19:26
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Default

I think I was feeding the "toot" with beans and certain veggies. That stuff we're unable to digest in them turns into a picnic for the little toot makers further downstream. That's my understanding, too, that there's some enzyme required to break down an unusual shaped type of sugar or something in them, that I don't think humans make. On my current animal foods experiment that's one thing I'm enjoying the absence of, the bloating and indigestion I got from plants.
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  #13   ^
Old Fri, Aug-03-18, 07:03
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teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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Default

So are we supposed to eat fiber in hopes that gut bacteria will ferment it to short chain fatty acids, with all their purported health benefits? Or worry that our gut bacteria will ferment the fiber we eat, effectively increasing the usable calorie content of our food? Personally I eat lots of fat, in hopes of absorbing it and using it to fuel my body.

I've tried fermentable fiber, resistant starch, increased sauerkraut in the diet. So far my research results amount to, sauerkraut is yummy, never caught any of it giving me improvements detectable for the home game. I can tell that low carb and keto did me good without expensive lab equipment.

One reason to prefer n=1 results--only large effects are measurable, small effects may be random. Even if not random, they may be clinically insignificant--by the time something is statistically significant for an individual, it's also liable to be clinically significant. Large sample size allows us to find things that are likely to be effective in a population, while highly unlikely to be effective in any one individual. Hoorah.
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