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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 16:02
ojoj's Avatar
ojoj ojoj is offline
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Default Overweight type 2 diabetes patients are 'cured by crash diet', scientists claim Chec

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-new...atients-2993010

Overweight type 2 diabetes sufferers could be cured by going on a crash diet, scientists believe.

Eleven patients were restored to full health within weeks of going on a diet of 800 calories a day.

They carried out tests on people who became obese after contracting diabetes and all proved successful.

Now a £2.4 million medical trial is to be carried out on 280 more patients with obesity-induced diabetes.

Diabetes accounts for 10% of the NHS budget and 2.6 million Brits have type 2, which differs from type 1 because it is closely associated with obesity.

It occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin or if body cells do not react to insulin - a hormone secreted in the pancreas.

Diabetics are at increased risk of heart attacks and strokes because the blood sugar level soars if the body has insufficient insulin.

Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University's MRI centre, said: “Changing calorie intake returned insulin production to normal. It’s exciting.

“The new study is to see whether GPs can use this approach to reverse diabetes in their patients and whether it will stay reversed."
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 16:13
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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And if they went on a "crash Diet" of Atkins Induction? Hmmm?
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 17:08
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mojolissa mojolissa is offline
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Plan: semi low-carb w/IF
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Yep, I wonder what those calories consist of: protein perhaps?
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 17:46
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Turtle2003 Turtle2003 is offline
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Plan: Atkins, Newcastle
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Here's a more complete description of the diet in the Daily Mail and it doesn't sound low carb at all, other than the fact there's no room for sugary junk.


Quote:
A family bereavement, high blood pressure, an unavoidable job change. I thought everything came in threes — but I was wrong. There was more bad news around the corner.

I was a fit 59-year-old and had just had an annual health check at my GP surgery. This revealed I had high blood sugar — 9millimoles per litre, whereas a normal level is 4-6mmol/l — and my doctor suggested I could have diabetes.

Further tests confirmed that, yes, I was type 2 diabetic. I was stunned. I have always been a healthy weight (I am 5ft 7in and just 10st 7lb), had no family history of diabetes, ate a healthy diet, never smoked, and I definitely did not have a sweet tooth.

Determined to find a solution, I began researching the condition and how to beat it.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to keep glucose levels normal (in type 1, the pancreas stops producing insulin altogether), and if I didn’t take action, I would be 36 per cent more likely to die early and could suffer bad sight, poor kidneys, heart failure and strokes. I’d also eventually be on medication.

My GP said that my diabetes was mild enough to be controlled through diet alone, and gave me a wad of leaflets on nutrition for diabetics. I took up salads, cut down on carbohydrates and ate my five-a-day — but progress was slow. Over seven months I shed a stone but my blood sugar was still too high — around 7mmol/l.

Not satisfied with this, further internet research threw up a more drastic approach. Scientists at Newcastle University had devised a radical low-calorie diet that studies suggested could reverse diabetes in under eight weeks.

This involved eating just 800 calories a day (a man’s recommended intake is 2,500) — 600 calories from meal replacement shakes and soups and 200 calories from green vegetables. You also drink three litres of water a day.

The theory behind the diet, which is the brainchild of Roy Taylor, professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University, is based on the fact that type 2 diabetes is often caused by fat clogging up the liver and pancreas, which are crucial in producing insulin and controlling blood sugar.

This is why weight gain is such a risk factor for the condition, particularly if that weight is carried around the belly and abdomen. However, there are some unfortunate people like myself who seem to be disposed to accumulating fat in the liver and pancreas, despite being a healthy weight.

Professor Taylor’s studies have shown that drastic dieting causes the body to go into starvation mode and burn fat stores for energy — and the fat around the organs seems to be targeted first.

This leads to the liver and pancreas becoming unclogged, and insulin and blood sugar levels returning to normal.

One study by Taylor’s team, published in 2011 in the journal Diabetologia, found that out of 11 type-2 diabetics following the diet, all reversed their diabetes in under eight weeks.

Further studies revealed that type 2 diabetics needed to lose one-sixth of their pre-diagnosis body weight to remove enough fat from the pancreas to allow normal insulin production to resume.

After contacting Professor Taylor, and getting the nod from my GP, I decided to follow the diet (experts warn never to start such a drastic regimen without first checking with your doctor). My target weight was 8st 12lb.

But surviving on a soup, two shakes and green veg (necessary to provide some fibre and keep the bowels healthy) wasn’t easy.
The diet involved eating just 800 calories a day compared to a man's recommended intake is 2,500

The diet involved eating just 800 calories a day compared to a man's recommended intake is 2,500

The first full day, a Sunday, I woke with no decent breakfast to look forward to — just some watery shake. (The meal-replacement shakes from the shops work fine — I used The Biggest Loser brand, but there are many available.)

After just one day my glucose levels had dropped from 6mmol/l to 5.9mmol/l. Hunger was never far away. But Professor Taylor said that the hunger pangs were something to celebrate, as it meant that the diet was working.

Toast yourself with water, he said, and the hunger will disappear. And it worked: I downed a pint of water and the hunger went.

The weight came off fast. By day three I had already lost 2lb.

Day four saw my glucose level plummet from 5.9mmol/l on the Sunday to 4.6mmol/l. I even started to get used to the idea of a shake for breakfast: thoughts of fresh crusty bread went out of the window. I was training my mind to reduce my choices and yet value the options remaining.

Lunch was my own delicious, thick mushroom soup (I blended mushrooms, onions, veg stock and herbs together), washed down with a cherry-flavoured shake. I gulped down a chicken soup supplement before leaving the office to see a play in the evening. Concentration levels were fine, but climbing up my local Tube station stairs afterwards was a real slog. I felt tired and lethargic.

The pattern continued each day. I experimented with more soups such as carrot, tomato and pea, baked veg, stir-fried veg, boiled veg and casseroles, liberally seasoned with herbs I’d never used before, such as cumin and paprika.

Some mornings I walked to work fine, others I was in a bit of a daze, and on certain days walking round the office was an effort. My family were concerned about me getting thinner and somewhat short-tempered.

Day six was a bad day. Despite it being mid July, I wore four layers of clothing to keep warm — and even then my fingers grew numb. I felt tired in the evening, and then constipation set in. Perhaps it was because I was not drinking enough water. Laxatives saved the day and the following morning I recorded my lowest overnight fasting glucose reading — 4.3mmol/l — a real boost.

On day eight I played cricket and it was hard watching teammates stuffing themselves with doughnuts. I had to toast a century-scoring colleague with water.

Three days on, I was down to 8st 13lb with my glucose level down to 4.1 mmol/l.

But I could not ignore concerned comments at work about my ‘shrinking’. Some of my clothes no longer fit me, and even I was slightly alarmed about how thin I had got in the face.

I was known as the ‘disappearing man’ by colleagues. It was time to stop the diet. (I then returned to a healthy wholegrain diet comprising lots of fruit and veg, chicken, fish and non-fatty foods).

Two months later, I got myself tested at the surgery to register a healthy, non-diabetic 5.1mmol/l and was elated when my GP told me: ‘Your diabetes has resolved itself.’

I had stuck to the diet for just 11 days, and reduced my blood sugar to a healthy non-diabetic level. It has remained that way for the past year — my latest reading was 4.9mmol/l. I have kept to just under 9st, joined a gym and gone running three times a week.

On Professor Taylor’s advice, I have also started building up my upper body muscle: bigger muscles soak up more glucose as energy, and thus prevent the body from storing more than it needs.
Professor Taylor started investigating the diet after he became intrigued by the observation that type 2 diabetes is reversed almost overnight in obese patients following gastric bypass surgery for weight loss.

‘The surgeons’ explanation was that it was something clever to do with gut hormones, which help control our appetite, but this was clearly unsatisfactory.’

Professor Taylor instead focused on the fact that patients were unable to eat much in the days following the surgery, and wondered if this could in fact be responsible for reversing diabetes.

‘I realised that this led to a sudden shift of fat away from the liver and pancreas. I thought we could test this by taking people with type 2 diabetes and mimicking the very sharp reduction in food intake after surgery.

‘I predicted this could strip fat out of the liver and pancreas and both organs would return to normal — and our subsequent work has confirmed this.’

And the work continues. Alan Tutty, 54, from Seaburn Dene, Sunderland, is one of 34 volunteers in Newcastle University’s second trial looking at longer term effects of the diet. In eight weeks between last November and January, he, too, successfully reversed his type 2 diabetes, shedding 26lb to reach his target weight of 13st 3lb.

‘Since coming off the diet, my weight has occasionally risen to 13st 9lb, but it’s always crept back down to 13st 5lb,’ he says.

The approach has been met with excitement by other experts in the field. James Walker, consultant diabetologist at Livingston hospital, West Lothian, believes the research challenged conventional thinking.

‘A lot of people have perhaps too simplistically thought that once the pancreas starts to fail, and stop producing insulin, it is an inevitable decline. But this diet challenges that.

‘And what is brilliant is that it works so quickly. We’ve even produced a little diet booklet in West Lothian for patients mainly nicking Roy’s ideas.’

Professor Taylor’s team is now looking at whether it works for those who have had type 2 for many years, and also whether the pancreas stays free of fat following the diet.

The findings are due to be published next year. In the meantime, I’ll stick to my healthy diet to keep myself diabetes-free. I don’t fancy tackling those shakes again.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...l#ixzz2pZRQVtcl
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 18:28
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teaser teaser is offline
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I saw an abstract a couple days ago. Same type of study, type II diabetics put on a crash diet, all apparent symptoms of diabetes reversed.

It was published in 1972.

I do think there's something to be said for therapeutic fasting, or just plain low-calorie near-fasting. The idea given that the liver and pancreas get defatted during the low calorie period makes sense. Long-term it would probably be better if people went on a diet that didn't eventually get them right back where they started.

There are mouse studies where they feed the mice total crud one week, the barely-acceptable crud we call mouse chow the next. The mice don't get sick, or fat. I think it's better to just eat right all the time, but since not everybody in the world wants to do that, I guess it's probably good if there are possibly other options.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 18:32
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
I'm back on my healthy wholegrain diet.


Good luck with that one.

As Gary Taubes pointed out in GCBC, calories that low can't help but reduce the carbs, too.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 18:58
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vG3V22cLUF0

Reminds me of this. "Simply Raw--reversing diabetes in 30 days" video. Unlike Neal Barnard, I think these guys are on to something. This is a breed of raw veganism that allows nuts and full-fat cocoa. Other than Atkins friendly vegetables, there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of carbohydrate in the diet.

I think this is just another low carb intervention, and they're focused on the raw vegan angle.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Jan-05-14, 22:15
tragedian tragedian is offline
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I don't have any idea if this will cure the diabetes, but I know for sure it won't cure the person.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 05:53
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tragedian
I don't have any idea if this will cure the diabetes, but I know for sure it won't cure the person.


It's possible that drastic calories, whatever their composition, will perform the Metabolic Magic of Limited Fasting and temporarily reset some stuck switches.

But PJ is right that moving forward cannot be a return to the same.
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 06:14
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ojoj ojoj is offline
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Plan: atkins
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If nothing else, a crash diet will give everything (pancreas, liver, etc) a bit of a rest, to recuperate. But how long can anyone stay on a crash diet? and what then?

Jo xxx
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 07:07
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojoj
If nothing else, a crash diet will give everything (pancreas, liver, etc) a bit of a rest, to recuperate. But how long can anyone stay on a crash diet? and what then?

Jo xxx


I've informally studied the "bariatric surgery" phenomenon for years, and it creates this same kind of trap. Though assertions like this at least point out we can get the short-term, diabetes, results without such drastic steps.

I had been casually acquainted with a couple, lovely people whose BBQ's were absolutely hellish for me. It was a potluck situation, and I discovered the fruit salad I had brought, and the hot dogs and frozen beef patties on the grill, were literally the only foods at this event which were not 90% carbs.

And my hosts and their guests were also, you know, 90% carbs.

So I was sadly not surprised when I found out a few years later that both my hosts had had gastric bypass, that it "stopped working," and they had given up on food-based solutions to their health woes; which were apparently considerable.

This leads me to believe that moving away from gastric surgery for weight loss can only be a good thing. From my observations, it's about 10% success, 80% backsliding, and 10% deadly.
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 07:14
ojoj's Avatar
ojoj ojoj is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 210/126/127 Female 5ft 7in
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Progress: 101%
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I've informally studied the "bariatric surgery" phenomenon for years, and it creates this same kind of trap. Though assertions like this at least point out we can get the short-term, diabetes, results without such drastic steps.

I had been casually acquainted with a couple, lovely people whose BBQ's were absolutely hellish for me. It was a potluck situation, and I discovered the fruit salad I had brought, and the hot dogs and frozen beef patties on the grill, were literally the only foods at this event which were not 90% carbs.

And my hosts and their guests were also, you know, 90% carbs.

So I was sadly not surprised when I found out a few years later that both my hosts had had gastric bypass, that it "stopped working," and they had given up on food-based solutions to their health woes; which were apparently considerable.

This leads me to believe that moving away from gastric surgery for weight loss can only be a good thing. From my observations, it's about 10% success, 80% backsliding, and 10% deadly.


I dont know much about bariatric surgery, but apparently, the stomach restretches after a while and of course it doesnt prevent sugary drinks - in fact I've heard of someone who used to liquidise mars bars to help her to still have her fix

Jo xxx
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 07:29
64dodger 64dodger is offline
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Healthy wholegrain diet=oxymoron.
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  #14   ^
Old Mon, Jan-06-14, 23:47
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mike_d mike_d is offline
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What they are likely seeing is the effect of calorie restriction or fasting which can reverse or cure insulin resistance.
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Jan-07-14, 05:49
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ojoj ojoj is offline
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In the end, it all boils down to humans eating far too much and eating the wrong stuff!

Jo xxx
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