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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jan-26-24, 13:49
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default Is Glucose the New Gluten? Inside the Blood-Sugar Health Craze

Quote:
Is Glucose the New Gluten? Inside the Blood-Sugar Health Craze

Proponents say that food ‘hacks’ meant to minimize blood-sugar spikes help them think more clearly, have more energy and reduce cravings. But some of the guidance is up for debate.


What do a Hollywood starlet, an Olympic gold medalist and a Harvard longevity researcher have in common? All of them follow an influencer who has kicked off a health craze known as the Glucose Goddess Method.

More of a philosophy than a diet, the Glucose Goddess approach consists of “hacks” meant to minimize blood-sugar spikes. Proponents say that following its guidance can help people think more clearly, have more energy and reduce cravings. Crucially, the method isn’t about losing weight, says its creator, a French biochemist named Jessie Inchauspé. Followers don’t need to cut out carbs or count points. Instead, they’re advised to consider food groups and the order in which they consume them.

“I’m just taking studies done by scientists across the world and bringing them to the forefront,” said Inchauspé, 31.

Glucose has become the new gluten—a medical sensitivity turned nutritional obsession for the masses. As the diabetes drug Ozempic has upended the old ways of thinking about food, willpower and weight loss, it has also put a spotlight on the importance of regulating blood sugar beyond the treatment of diabetes. That has fueled interest in glucose-management products, from supplements to continuous glucose monitors (CGMs). Health personalities like Inchauspé are spreading the word.

Her so-called hacks include starting meals with vegetables, eating a savory breakfast and putting “clothes”—protein, fat or fiber—on carbs. She also recommends drinking a tablespoon of diluted vinegar a day; consumed before a sweet treat or carb-heavy meal, she said, it can minimize a glucose spike.

Inchauspé has spun the tenets of her method into a Glucose Goddess empire that follows a familiar diet-industry playbook. She has two bestselling books, an Instagram account with 3.2 million followers, an online certification course ($2,499), a recipe club ($4.99 a month) and, in the coming weeks, a video podcast and a supplement ($65 a bottle).

“Honestly, this stuff is not that revolutionary,” Inchauspé said. She’s just found an appealing way to market existing research for the social-media age. “I see myself as a behavior-change encourager,” she said.

Her interest in holistic nutrition came after breaking her back at the age of 19 and struggling with anxiety and depersonalization—feeling disconnected from her physical form. She studied biochemistry at Georgetown University, where she got her master’s, and then joined the DNA-testing company 23andMe. There, she raised her hand to participate in a company study that used CGMs, medical devices developed for diabetics. They are adhesive and contain a tiny needle that goes just beneath the skin.

Inchauspé, who isn’t diabetic, saw a correlation between her glucose spikes and mental health. “It’s like a combination of brain fog, anxiety, feeling out of your body that I had been having since I was a teenager.”

The revelation “completely changed my life,” she said.

She built an app to chart data from her CGM to illustrate for others how foods and behaviors affected her. She absorbed a huge body of research to try to make sense of the numbers. In 2019, she started sharing her findings on Instagram. “I took it upon myself to try to get this information out as much as I could,’” she said.

Six months in, she quit her job and to focus on Glucose Goddess full-time. On her account, she shares charts showing how eating a bowl of red-lentil pasta (big spike) compares to having red lentils on their own (no spike), or how snacking on chocolate cake (another big spike) compares to eating it after a large chicken salad (no spike). The information is based on CGM data and meant to illustrate existing research.

Inchauspé’s books “Glucose Revolution” and “The Glucose Goddess Method” have sold over 400,000 copies in the U.S., according to publisher Simon & Schuster. She said her first advance helped finance her glucose empire and that she has reinvested her earnings in its expansion. Her legion of Instagram followers include Gwyneth Paltrow, Rita Ora, Lily James, Orlando Bloom and Karlie Kloss.

This comes at a time when people are increasingly putting their trust in influencers for information about health, regardless of credentials, and making purchases based on their recommendations.

Laura Bellows, associate professor of Nutritional Science at Cornell University, said some of the studies on blood-glucose levels cited to support Inchauspé’s hacks are based on small sample sizes, and their findings may not apply to a broader population. Bellows said some of the hacks are widely accepted by nutritionists, such as having protein and fat with carbs, while others may overstate what is known about their effectiveness, like the benefits of vinegar. “I would much rather people pay attention to how they feel and how their body is reacting,” she said.

Inchauspé’s supplement, called Anti-Spike, will cost $65 for one bottle or $52 for a monthly subscription. She said it contains mulberry leaf and lemon-peel extracts, antioxidants from green vegetables, and cinnamon. She said that other supplements on the market add ingredients that counteract possible benefits or aren’t supported by science. Supplements are not subject to approval by the Food and Drug Administration.

There’s also a “Glucose Goddess” online-certification program, which Inchauspé recently launched for health and wellness professionals. The online course takes about 20 hours to complete and gives participants access to resources such as meal plan templates to use in their practices. She said the idea is to provide a “more technical” level of information compared to her podcast and social media. Only a “handful” of people have taken it so far, she said.

Inchauspé has been embraced by popular health personalities. Harvard longevity researcher David Sinclair blurbed her first book. Fitness influencer Melissa Wood-Tepperberg and Dr. Mark Hyman, who has been beating the drum about blood sugar for many years, both had her on their podcasts.

“We’re having a cultural zeitgeist shift where sugar is definitely understood to be something that we should be reducing or balancing in our diet,” said Dr. Hyman. But he said, peoples’ responses to these food hacks may vary.

Startups like Levels and Signos are now encouraging the use of CGMs, which require a prescription to obtain, by nondiabetics as wellness or weight-loss tools when paired with their apps. The FDA hasn’t clearly communicated whether this is acceptable or not. The agency declined to comment. Sinclair and Hyman both serve as advisers to Levels.

The companies’ apps, which charge monthly subscription fees in the hundreds, pull in information from CGMs to help people better understand their metabolic health or lose weight. Through these companies, users can connect with doctors to be assessed for a CGM prescription. Levels and Signos say they are both conducting studies on how glucose affects nondiabetic people. Signos says it requires its users to take part in these studies; Levels says it does not.

Signos co-founder and chief executive Sharam Fouladgar-Mercer said the company has benefited from broader attention to blood sugar, in part due to the popularity of drugs like Ozempic. CGM-maker Dexcom said it sells its CGMs wholesale to Signos and Levels for use in clinical trials. It said in a statement that it is “working toward a future where everyone uses or has access to a glucose biosensor.” Abbott, another CGM-maker, said it provides sensors to “a few” companies for use in clinical trials for nondiabetics.

Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and professor of nutrition and medicine at Tufts University, said CGMs can be useful tools for understanding how foods affect glucose levels. But, he said, “if you obsessively follow glucose, you’d miss the harms of fructose and refined protein.” Yes, glucose is an important health marker to pay attention to, Mozaffarian said, but it’s not the only one.

Some of Inchauspé’s advice is up for debate. She tells followers that all sugar is created equal from a molecular standpoint and that she’d rather drink Diet Coke than orange juice. But nutritional experts point out that artificial sweeteners can be harmful in other ways.

Inchauspé has been criticized for her use of CGMs and began distancing herself from the devices in 2022, around the time she was coming out with her first book.

“I got a lot of messages from people who have Type 1 diabetes who said, ‘Jessie, this is so offensive that you would post this as a fashion statement when [I] need this to live.’ So I was like, ‘f—, I never thought about that,’” she said. Now she only wears a monitor about twice a year for a couple of weeks.

Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn said she had been implementing Inchauspé’s hacks for well over a year before testing a CGM to see the data for herself. She saw how changes to the order of what she ate, like having a salad or greens before something sweet, affected her energy.

“I used to get tired after meals,” Vonn said. Now, she said, that doesn’t happen.

https://www.wsj.com/health/wellness...pe-cgm-ea0e3135
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jan-26-24, 13:54
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Demi Demi is offline
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Blood Sugar Tracking: The Trend Taking Over The Wellness World

Metabolic health is in the spotlight


The hottest accessory as of late is not a handbag, nor is it the latest iPhone. It’s not even an Oura Ring, the sleek wellness wearable loved by Gwyneth and Kim K. No: the status symbol of 2024 is a little yellow circle stuck to your upper arm, recognised by those in-the-know as the famous Zoe glucose patch, which had racked up a 200,000-strong waiting list before launching in spring 2022.

All of a sudden, blood sugar tracking is everywhere. In the past, it’s safe to say the majority of people – bar diabetics – never gave much thought to their blood glucose levels. But in recent years, the topic has emerged as the buzziest metric for monitoring your health, largely as a result of a spate of new devices known as continuous glucose monitors, which are now being widely marketed rather than kept within the diabetics realm.

Zoe, created by doctor and epidemiologist Tim Spector, is the most well-known, but newbies are popping up all the time, including a recent launch from health tech firm Abbott, the Lingo.

TikTok and Instagram, meanwhile, are awash with blood sugar influencers, such as French biochemist Glucose Goddess, who has developed a cult-like following for her hacks on monitoring glucose levels in the body. She has gone on to write a book about the topic, The Glucose Goddess Method, which is filled with tips on how to ‘curb your cravings, clear your skin, slow your ageing process, reduce inflammation, rebalance your hormones, improve your mood and sleep better than you have ever done before.’ Wow – it’s tempting stuff. So should we all be jumping aboard the trend?

What Is Blood Sugar Tracking?

Blood sugar is also known as glucose, which derives from the Greek word for ‘sweet’. It’s a type of sugar which comes from the foods we eat, particularly carbohydrates, and the body uses it for energy, ensuring your organs function properly – including the brain.

Our glucose levels fluctuate throughout the day, in response to the foods we eat and the order we eat them in, as well as factors like exercise and sleep. Although some sugary foods and drinks are notorious for causing excessive spikes, everyone is individual, hence the surge in glucose trackers, which offer personal information on how what you’re consuming is affecting your blood sugar levels.

‘Healthy blood sugar control is key to good health,’ says Rhian Stephenson, a nutritionist, naturopath and founder of ARTAH. ‘When it is dysregulated, we can experience impaired immunity, anxiety, fluctuating energy levels, headaches, brain fog, cravings, visceral weight gain and more.

‘It plays a role in several conditions, from PCOS and metabolic syndrome to type 2 diabetes and cancer, so understanding what contributes to, and can remedy, poor blood sugar control is essential for short- and long-term health outcomes.’

Best Glucose Monitors For 2024

Zoe


The queen of the glucose world, Zoe is a personalised nutrition programme which works in two parts: the initial test kit, and the membership. Once you’ve made it through the waitlist, you’ll be sent your glucose monitor, along with an at-home testing kit which analyses your blood fat response and gut health. After getting your results, you’ll be provided with bespoke information on how your body responds to food, along with recipe ideas and more.

Test kit is £259.99, monthly Zoe app from £24.99. zoe.com

Lingo by Abbott

Lingo by Abbott is coming to the UK this year after a preview period in 2023. Inserted into the arm using a filament, the wearable device can track glucose levels in real time, which Abbot says will allow for more personalised ways to improve health. It can be kept in place for up to two weeks at a time, with a subscription service available for users who want to analyse their blood sugar over a longer period of time.

From £89 for a single sensor. shop.hellolingo.com

Veri Method

Founded in 2019, Nordic-born Veri is another metabolic health company focused on glucose monitoring. The programme involves attaching a continuous glucose monitor to your arm and tracking your blood sugar levels for 56 days, learning about your body’s response to different food, types of exercise and other pillars along the way.

From £129 per month. veri.co

https://www.countryandtownhouse.com...sugar-tracking/
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Mar-17-24, 04:21
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Doctors question science behind blood sugar diet trend

Blood sugar monitors are unnecessary for people without diabetes and could, in extreme cases, fuel eating disorders, leading doctors have warned.


They are part of a personalised diet trend, promoted on social media and spearheaded by companies including ZOE.

But NHS national diabetes advisor Prof Partha Kar said there is no strong evidence the gadgets help people without the condition.

ZOE said research is at an early stage but is "cutting edge".

In people with diabetes, blood sugar - also known as blood glucose - can remain high for several hours after eating. At very high levels this can cause organ damage if it's not monitored and kept in check.

ZOE - previously involved with the Covid symptom-tracking app - is one of the main companies selling the blood sugar monitors to people without the condition.

Now it offers a programme, starting at around £300, which it advertises widely, including across social media platforms.

Participants log their food intake and wear a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) for two weeks to measure blood sugar levels after eating.

In separate tests, they also have their responses to fat, and their gut bacteria tested.

ZOE says all of these tests have helped it identify that even two healthy people can have wildly different responses to the same food - for example one person's blood sugar might spike and dip more after eating carbohydrates than another person's.

It suggests this could guide individual food decisions.

But other researchers argue that what, if anything, those numbers mean - including bigger spikes and dips in blood sugar within the non-diabetic range - is still not properly understood.

Dr Nicola Guess, a dietitian and diabetes researcher at the University of Oxford, said the majority of evidence linking high, and highly varied, blood sugar to health problems is based on glucose levels only seen in people with diabetes or prediabetes.

High blood sugar is a symptom, not directly a cause, of diabetes, she explains.

Type 1 diabetes is when an individual's pancreas stops producing insulin, so regular injections are needed. Type 2 diabetes is more common and occurs when the cells in the body become resistant to insulin and so more is needed to keep blood glucose levels within a normal range. It can usually be controlled through diet, exercise and close monitoring.

In people without diabetes, Prof Kar said "the evidence base is nothing" for understanding what the swings in blood sugar mean.

ZOE points to some evidence - including some very small studies - suggesting that even before it reaches prediabetic or diabetic levels, having higher blood sugar and big variations through the day may be linked to some worse outcomes. Most data is still in diabetic patients, though.

It says it is investigating gut bacteria and starting to see links between gut microbes, diet and health.

Gut microbiome expert and colorectal surgeon at Imperial College London, James Kinross, said while the microbiome was very important, direct-to-consumer testing was "problematic" because "this is such a young science and there are many unanswered questions about how the microbiome influences our health."

ZOE's chief scientist Dr Sarah Berry told the BBC its programme used "decades" of existing nutrition research, and their own studies on links between blood sugar and health.

But she acknowledges that "we don't have all of the evidence".

But given the risks of poor diet we already understand, she said, "it would actually be irresponsible to wait" decades to understand long-term outcomes like heart disease and death.

Dr Ran Crooke, a GP who founded a company providing health services to start-ups, praised the company for trying to gather the evidence, and said not having all the evidence on blood sugar shouldn't be "stifling innovation".

He and others, including some of ZOE's critics, agree CGMs could potentially be a helpful tool for some people to motivate them and change their diet.

However, people have been sounding the alarm over diet-related illness for decades. Yet hundreds of diet programmes have failed to resolve the challenge of getting people to stick to habits when their environment - a modern prevalence of high-sugar foods, for example - and biology seems to be stacked against them. And they aren't without risks themselves.

The company said: "ZOE is scientifically rigorous in its approach, unrivalled by others in the industry in terms of clinical trials, robust research and a dedicated team of scientists and nutrition professionals looking to improve health through useful, evidence-based advice."

But Dr Guess is concerned she is seeing patients who use ZOE's products cutting out foods she believes are good for their health, because they seem to spike their blood sugar.

That in itself can lead to health problems, and is not recommended by the company.

She adds people who avoid carbohydrates will get a temporarily "exaggerated glucose response" the next time they eat them - which she says is "perfectly normal," but that could potentially lead them to think they are unable to tolerate carbs at all.

Prof Kar thinks using CGMs - which are used by people with diabetes - when there's no health reason to do so can drive an obsessive focus on numbers which, in the most extreme cases, "can translate into eating disorders".

According to eating disorder charity Beat, "people with eating disorders often fixate on numbers... as part of their illness, so we'd never recommend that anybody affected uses glucose monitors".

ZOE does attempt to screen out people with a history of eating disorders, and Dr Berry told the BBC the company takes "the wellbeing of our members very seriously," and that customers have access to trained nutrition coaches, who can support them with food anxiety and refer them on if they feel there's a problem.

The company has published research based on the data it has collected from participants to try to find patterns in areas like food choices, hunger and blood test results. But it can't show which aspects are actually causing changes to health and which are coincidences.

ZOE has carried out a study to understand changes caused by the programme, but it has not yet been published.

Critics are concerned this study won't be able to unpick the effects of the programme's different elements, such as personalised diets based on test results versus support and coaching.

Dr Berry argues ZOE's programme is, "a very holistic product that doesn't involve just microbiome testing or just continuous glucose monitoring".

However, Dr Guess believes since these elements remain unproven, without them, it's just a "sciencey-sounding way of having people eat more fruit and veg".

A lot of ZOE's advice, including around eating more whole foods and fewer processed foods, is sensible, she thinks but she believes this message is "not compelling enough" to sell a £300 product.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-68452019
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Mar-17-24, 08:57
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Trying to manage your insulin based on the blips of your CGM is like trying to measure the volume of the ocean by measuring the height of the waves standing on the beach.

Lean and metabolically healthy people have stable blood glucose but stabilising your blood glucose will not make you lean and metabolically healthy.

More about CGMs at:
CGM Data Demystified: Your Path to Metabolic Health
https://optimisingnutrition.com/con...nitor-cgm-data/

This article reflects why many people who have used Zoe or Levels end up at Optimising Nutrition. They read the Data Driven Fasting manual to understand What to do with all that CGM data! It is less confusing and way less expensive to use an OTC glucose monitor but unfortunately these new shiny toys appeal yet don’t come with a user manual.

Quote:
She adds people who avoid carbohydrates will get a temporarily "exaggerated glucose response" the next time they eat them - which she says is "perfectly normal," but that could potentially lead them to think they are unable to tolerate carbs at all.
Yes! …someone goes lower and lower carb from 20 total carbs until they end up at carnivore then "one blueberry" gives an exaggerated BG response. Dr Naiman had a good explanation starting Minute 39 in https://youtu.be/XhhoJAY96FA?si=EWPSQhaMoT8atvsB

Good articles All about Insulin at end of this guide:

https://optimisingnutrition.com/ins...tes-management/

Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, Mar-18-24 at 07:00.
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Mar-17-24, 12:51
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Dodger Dodger is online now
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Without knowing how much insulin your pancreas is putting out, the glucose level doesn't mean much. You can have a good blood glucose level but your pancreas could be putting out a treemendous amout of insulin to keep the glucoes down. Eventually the pancreas will not be able to keep up and you are then diabetic. If the insulin level had been tracked then the diet could have been changed before the pancreas wore out.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Mar-18-24, 05:15
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
You can have a good blood glucose level but your pancreas could be putting out a tremendous amount of insulin to keep the glucose down. Eventually the pancreas will not be able to keep up and you are then diabetic.


Agreed. Though, years ago, DH started his health journey with a blood glucose! meter.

"Track each meal for a week. See what your body says."

Those numbers are very persuasive.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Mar-18-24, 09:16
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bkloots bkloots is offline
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I call Balderdash!!

Quote:
“Honestly, this stuff is not that revolutionary,” Inchauspé said. She’s just found an appealing way to market existing research for the social-media age. “I see myself as a behavior-change encourager,” she said.


That’s what it’s about. I say more power to the person who can make money off some “magic” solution to weight management--as long as the method isn’t actually harmful.

In fact, that’s why I have extreme reservations about Ozempic et al. Nobody knows what the long-term consequences might be in the body--let alone the budget. I feel very lucky to have dodged a bullet since I took (at doctor’s suggestion) about three months of fen/phen decades ago. My heart, I’m grateful to say, is still ticking nicely.

I know now that the tendency to accumulate fat has genetic factors, and in some cases, might even be considered a chronic “disease” in the tissue. Lifelong study and practice of nutrition for your own situation can’t be dodged with new meds, new meters, etc. without genuine knowledge and commitment.

I’m thankful for watchful and knowledgeable friends right here!
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Mar-26-24, 05:54
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkloots
I’m thankful for watchful and knowledgeable friends right here!


So am I. I credit this forum for so many skills to counter disinformation

Maybe this is why low carb/keto was called a fad and still is, but refuses to go away. Banting spread the word with his pamphlets. Now, we have people on social media raving about the amazing results of eating real food.

And people can trust it. Because the only big money I know of that came from real food was the Swanson fortune, who figured out how to freeze it for the war effort. We do have better nutrition at a result.

The other was modern broccoli, and that came with Bond movies!

At the very least, people have to learn to stop paying food prices for dirt.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Mar-27-24, 02:23
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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When I saw this headline again, it ticked me off. They said keto was a "craze" and now it's part of cancer therapy.

Which they NEVER cover. Ever. You'd think they would be carrying on about it? They do about drugs and procedures. Isn't this a discovery?

That bothers me a lot.

We don't even know how many people have gluten sensitivity. It made a world of difference to me. It's not a "fad" to discover this was a huge problem, after all.
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Mar-27-24, 13:08
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
When I saw this headline again, it ticked me off. They said keto was a "craze" and now it's part of cancer therapy.

Which they NEVER cover. Ever. You'd think they would be carrying on about it? They do about drugs and procedures. Isn't this a discovery?


That bothers me a lot.

We don't even know how many people have gluten sensitivity. It made a world of difference to me. It's not a "fad" to discover this was a huge problem, after all.


They'll cover those stories when they can figure out how to market keto as a therapeutic treatment.


*Future crazy conspiracy theory alert*

Imagine a time when everyone on the planet has been convinced to go completely plant based, with all carbs all the time, assured that humans don't need animal protein, or animal fats, just lots and lots of plants... No animal products at all sold in stores or restaurants.


Only then will they start looking into some of these old studies that show LC and Keto can cure a plethora of illnesses: cancer, diabetes, auto-immune.

But what to do, what to do - no one eats animal proteins or fats any more! You can't buy it in the stores!

Marketing gurus know what to do though: Create UPFs which are made purely from animal fats and proteins, available only as a prescription from your Dr - marketed as the only medically approved food that causes remission of diabetes and cancer.

In severe cases where the patients are so addicted to carbs that they can't stay away from them unless they have no access to them at all, they may be admitted to inpatient facilities where they will be allowed to eat only animal fats and proteins to eat. Visitors will be searched to make sure they're not bringing in any plant based foods.

Animal fat and protein supplemental drugs may be available only by Dr's prescription for those who are suffering from various nutritional deficiencies. ("Ask your Doctor is Bovi-Chic-Por is right for you!")
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Mar-29-24, 03:13
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
Animal fat and protein supplemental drugs may be available only by Dr's prescription for those who are suffering from various nutritional deficiencies. ("Ask your Doctor is Bovi-Chic-Por is right for you!")


Oh, sadly, it is not science fiction OR fantasy! It is exactly what they are trying to do, right here, right now. I just found a lost classic book, (still not on Kindle!), The Space Merchants. Where corporations put addictive substances in their products so people crave the ones from a particular brand.

And we are "this" close. Because if sugar and grains weren't such an inseparable part of our culture, they would be scientifically classified as addictive substances.

Which leads to the all too common reasons people freak out when I try to talk to them about diet. The thought that their tormenting cravings are being increased by Grandma's cookies is not something they can handle. The mere thought of "life without bread" borders on making them very upset.

So I can't really talk to anyone until they are ready to talk. I'll just walk around town looking good (found a fashion video which explained elegance in a way I understood,) so I'm not just throwing on a sweatshirt anymore.

If all I can be, from friends and relatives all the way to people I get my coffee from when I'm out, I feel an obligation to at least be a visible reminder of what's possible.

I live in a small town and worked all over. They've already seen my before & after.
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Old Sun, Mar-31-24, 02:53
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Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
Has our obsession with tracking glucose spikes gone too far?

Studying our sugar levels might not reveal as much as we think, writes Simon Usborne


In 2017 the NHS started to prescribe a revolutionary device. The FreeStyle Libre looked a bit like a nicotine patch. When pressed onto the upper arm, an almost imperceptible little probe within the sensor monitored glucose levels via the liquids just under the skin, sending a readout to a handheld device.

The digital patches kept tabs on blood sugar levels and did away with the need to prick fingers and add blood droplets to testing strips. They could also raise the alarm in case of dangerous spikes or drops in sugar. The system was a game-changer for diabetics.

Today, it seems, we are all encouraged to slap glucose sensors on our arms. The Zoe patch — a circular yellow sticker that, along with an app, analyses your blood sugar response to food — has become an accessory on a par with an Apple Watch. And the rise of glucose tracking has created one of the most unlikely influencer communities. Jessie Inchauspé, a French biochemist known as the Glucose Goddess, shares the findings from her monitor on Instagram, where she has more than three million followers. “I discovered that the days where I had more glucose spikes my mental health was worse, and the days where my glucose levels were steady corresponded to days where I felt better,” she says.

Inchauspé now drinks a tablespoon of vinegar diluted in water before a meal. “Vinegar contains acetic acid, which slows down the breakdown of starches and how quickly glucose arrives in your bloodstream, creating a smaller spike for the same carbs,” she says.

But when blood sugar monitoring isn’t a matter of life or death — as it can be for diabetics — what’s the point?

Sugar highs and lows are normal. Our body breaks down carbohydrates and uses the sugars to power all our cells and functions. This leads to a short-term change in blood glucose levels, which typically peak about 30 minutes after eating before returning to a baseline after around two hours.

“But there is evidence to show that really high peaks or big dips that are repeated throughout the day come with a risk,” says Sarah Berry, a senior lecturer in nutritional sciences at King’s College London, an expert in postprandial metabolism — aka the body’s response to food — and chief scientist at Zoe.

Extreme fluctuations can be caused not just by sugary snacks but also carb-heavy foods such as white rice and pasta. And Berry says they can ultimately cause inflammation and damage the blood vessels, affecting the flow of blood around the body and leading to serious health problems including obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

Then there is the more quotidian issue of the energy slump, which can affect mood and productivity a couple of hours after that raid on the biscuit tin. Monitoring your glucose levels could help you to make healthier eating decisions.

The ways people metabolise carbs can vary wildly but, as a general rule, replacing “white” ones with “brown” helps to reduce spikes and dips. So does adding a small amount of protein and fat to carbs — this slows down their digestion, delaying the flow of sugar into the blood.

In a study Berry carried out, one group ate a bagel with a smear of butter. The other group had the same bagel with cheese, which contains fat and protein. “The second group saw a huge reduction in the postprandial glucose response,” she says. Berry suggests there is some evidence in favour of the Glucose Goddess’s vinegar trick — but wonders how many people want to do it.

There are more clear-cut downsides to this monitoring. Trackers can be gamed: you could eat massive plates of bacon and eggs three times a day and reduce your sugar spikes, but you probably wouldn’t be very healthy.

“I think if someone has a history of disordered eating, they should not wear a glucose monitor because it can create stress,” Inchauspé says. Berry adds: “What’s really important is to make sure people realise that increases in blood glucose are a normal physiological response to meals, but let’s see what we can do to prevent them going really high.”

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...o-far-qzz0czh7z
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Mar-31-24, 03:58
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Is The Times catching up with the previous articles in January? There are quite a few articles on the Zoe website, https://zoe.com/blog but I’m not sure if the health study referred here used any new data. Zoe is also big into gut microbiome, and monitoring poop.

Lean and metabolically healthy people have stable blood glucose but stabilising your blood glucose will not make you lean and metabolically healthy.

Simply switching carbs for fat to stabilise blood glucose is not necessarily optimal for people whose primary goal is to lose body fat, reverse their insulin resistance and improve their metabolic health.

"Clothing your carbs in fat" is a hack, not the path to weight loss or metabolic health. I use a simple, inexpensive glucose monitor (only occasionally now) but still use the results to control hunger and lose weight. Check out the next DDF challenge that starts Saturday, April6 or try the app free on your own. https://optimisingnutrition.com/dat...ting-challenge/

More about CGMs at:
CGM Data Demystified: Your Path to Metabolic Health

https://optimisingnutrition.com/con...nitor-cgm-data/

Last edited by JEY100 : Sun, Mar-31-24 at 04:29.
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Mar-31-24, 06:24
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demi
Trackers can be gamed: you could eat massive plates of bacon and eggs three times a day and reduce your sugar spikes, but you probably wouldn’t be very healthy.


I guess this is their big point, yet it's so distorted and untrue. Since now we have people claiming they binge on meat now that they are on keto "so it didn't work" because that's not a normal response to food, either.

And I also don't believe them as a former sufferer: there is no brainping! when we eat a steak. Great flavor and a sense of well-being and when I'm done, I'm done, even if there are two bites left on the plate.

So if anyone are indeed binging on bacon and eggs, they have gone from metabolic derangement to the full version.
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Old Sun, Mar-31-24, 06:44
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Members of this very forum have been binging on Eggs and Bacon for years.
https://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=234866
Or doing Egg Fasts swimming in butter or the ever popular Fat Fast, ala Jimmy Moore. The newest version is now High Fat Carnivore. Twitter is back to eating sticks of butter The idea that you can overeat calories and lose weight will never lose its appeal.

Back to this glucose article and why Insulin is the Cart, not the Horse, Ted Naiman explains on this podcast, minute 44 to 59. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podca...i=1000624625885

Last edited by JEY100 : Sun, Mar-31-24 at 07:28.
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