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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Jan-07-24, 14:48
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 26,565
 
Plan: Muscle Centric
Stats: 238/153/160 Female 5'10"
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Location: UK
Default The anti-ageing benefits of eating protein

Quote:
The anti-ageing benefits of eating protein

Midlife often means weight gain and muscle loss — but upping your protein intake could change that

Dr Gabrielle Lyon


Many people struggle with gaining weight in midlife. I hear it every day in my practice, with patients saying they are eating the same as they ever have and exercising the same amount, but putting on weight.

Our muscle health declines naturally, starting in about our thirties, in a process known as sarcopenia. By the age of fifty, muscle mass decreases at an annual rate of 1-2%. The lost muscle is often replaced by fat.

Added to this natural ageing process, we often become less active than we were in our 20s, more prone to injury and often eating a sub-par diet. This can create the perfect storm, leading to weight gain in middle age and beyond.

The danger of dieting without eating more protein

There are two fundamental principles to maintaining and even building muscle at any age: doing resistance exercises and eating a higher-protein diet. But the problem with the way many of us have traditionally dieted – and what I see a lot of middle-aged women do especially – is eat fewer and fewer calories, but not enough protein.

The result is that their muscle continues to waste away, their metabolism slows and, as a result, losing weight becomes ever harder. The old message that if you want to lose weight, you simply have to eat less and move more is outdated.

If you’re actively trying to lose weight, then yes, you need to be in calorie deficit. But as you cut your calories, you must also up the percentage of protein in your overall intake to protect muscle mass.

We are facing an obesity epidemic – but I believe that current medical advice is failing people and I’m on a mission to change that. I’ve seen up close how people with obesity struggle to lose weight, despite following the outdated advice of just cutting calories, doing more cardio but not paying attention to the amount of protein on the plate.

As we’re finding, increasing protein really is the solution – it helps you to feel full in the short term while improving your body composition in the longer term.

Why we need more protein in midlife and beyond

There are so many benefits of a protein-rich diet, including better balanced blood sugar, increased energy, mental clarity, decreased body fat and reduced cravings. It is crucial for longevity and repairing your body’s tissues.

But most midlife women I see are not eating enough. And I would argue that many people of all ages are not eating enough good-quality protein.

In the UK, Government guidelines for adults is 0.75g protein per kilo of body weight (or if you work in pounds, around 1g per 3 pounds of body weight). But these guidelines – as in the US – were created in the 1970s as a minimum level to prevent deficiencies; it’s not optimal by any stretch of the imagination.

How much protein we really need

My prescription for all adults is at least 1g per 1lb of your ideal body weight per day (or if you work in kilos, about 2.2g per 1kg of ideal body weight).

If you’re trying to lose weight and are on a reduced calorie diet, I suggest up to 1g per 1lb of ideal body weight, or even higher. On top of this, I recommend that the first and last meal of the day should contain at least 30g of protein. There is increasing evidence to show that if you eat 30-50g of protein for breakfast, it sets up your metabolism appropriately, controls hunger and stimulates muscle tissue.

To visualise 30g of protein, this equates to a large chicken breast or fish fillet, or a medium-sized steak or chop, but many more eggs than you might imagine – around five or six. If you’re stuck for inspiration, I send out a free newsletter with recipes containing 30g of protein each week. These are things that I eat with my family, such as egg and cheese frittatas and air-fried salmon bites.

Steak is better than vegan burgers

I personally eat a lot of red meat – I even have steak for breakfast some days. Red meat has had a bad rap, but a good-quality steak is so much better for your body than ultra-processed plant-based foods like meat-free burgers. Really good-quality meat – by which I mean grass-fed and organic – should be considered a superfood because it delivers so many of the nutrients we need, including iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin B12. It’s also a natural source of creatine, which may improve short-term memory.

There have been some reports saying a high-protein diet can lead to kidney dysfunction but several studies now tell us otherwise.

Muscle is the fountain of youth

Muscle should be seen as your body’s armour, protecting you from disease. There are multiple reasons why we develop Alzheimer’s, for example, but new research published in the British Medical Journal has found that if we build up our lean muscle mass it may help prevent it. It is still unclear why - one theory is that it is down to an increase in proteins circulating in the body. Nutrition and exercise programmes can help with recovery from all kinds of disease, including improving cancer outcomes.

We are all interested in living not only longer, but a better quality of life as we age, and the best way to safeguard your independence is to protect your skeletal muscle mass. According to NHS data, around 1 in 3 adults over 65 and half of people over 80 will have at least one fall a year, with the WHO reporting the second most common cause of accidental death is injury from a fall. Increased muscle mass reduces your risk of falling.

This is the long view, but even in the short term you will experience huge benefits from maintaining and building muscle. Increased muscle helps almost every function in the body, from sleep to energy, and even boosts your libido, thanks to increased production of testosterone. Extra muscle also helps you to get or stay lean and manage your weight in midlife and beyond.

It’s no exaggeration to say that I see higher muscle mass as the fountain of youth.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...eating-protein/


Good to see Dr Lyon featured in the UK media today
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Jan-07-24, 15:49
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,291
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/27%/25%
Progress: 134%
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Default

Excellent summary of her teachings..saves reading the book.

All good, but this is how to diet in a few sentences.
Quote:
There are two fundamental principles to maintaining and even building muscle at any age: doing resistance exercises and eating a higher-protein diet. But the problem with the way many of us have traditionally dieted – and what I see a lot of middle-aged women do especially – is eat fewer and fewer calories, but not enough protein. The result is that their muscle continues to waste away, their metabolism slows and, as a result, losing weight becomes ever harder. The old message that if you want to lose weight, you simply have to eat less and move more is outdated. If you’re actively trying to lose weight, then yes, you need to be in calorie deficit. But as you cut your calories, you must also up the percentage of protein in your overall intake to protect muscle mass… My prescription for all adults is at least 1g per 1lb of your ideal body weight per day (or if you work in kilos, about 2.2g per 1kg of ideal body weight).
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Jan-07-24, 15:59
Fauve Fauve is offline
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Posts: 1,274
 
Plan: Carnivore
Stats: 167/135/127 Female 63
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Location: Victoria, BC
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I just finished reading this book, it is excellent!
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jan-08-24, 03:00
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WereBear WereBear is online now
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Posts: 14,514
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/125/150 Female 67
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Progress: 136%
Location: USA
Default

Since following this:

Quote:
1g per 1lb of your ideal body weight per day


in part from JEY emphasizing its importance from her own experence, I've been slowly recovering.

Were I eating a SAD diet... I honestly don't think that would be so.

Addendum: And perhaps my high rate of protein intake is also about healing, where we need EXTRA. Lately, with my appetite back, I'm really craving meat.

Which is a craving I am happy to supply

Last edited by WereBear : Mon, Jan-08-24 at 04:13.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jan-08-24, 04:32
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,291
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/27%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

Good to hear this simple guideline helps WearBear recover health, as well as for weight loss. Some members here are stuck in the Diet-Regain cycle she describes, I was. Protein was solution, if you lower fat and increase nutrient dense foods.
To get the nutrients (I was low in Omega 3, calcium, etc) in addition to all the meats, I use seafood, dairy, eggs and poultry, even edamame and black beans. Some photos of all the popular proteins foods that provide 30g Protein per Meal (and why): https://optimisingnutrition.com/30g-protein/
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Jan-08-24, 09:51
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,740
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/167/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 116%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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I'm in the process of reading her book.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Jan-08-24, 15:47
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Posts: 4,318
 
Plan: vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
Default

I'm #160 on hold for the 5 copies my library has, but I am basically following this principal while I wait - same or more protein, real food.

The key problem with diets that say you can still eat all your favourites if you just eat fewer calories, is that people often keep the junkiest junk during the diet and gain it all back after the diet on the same food.
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Jan-09-24, 03:36
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,514
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/125/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 136%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
There is increasing evidence to show that if you eat 30-50g of protein for breakfast, it sets up your metabolism appropriately, controls hunger and stimulates muscle tissue.


One of the first things I did when discovering Dr. Jack Kruse was get that big dose of protein in the morning, and it DID help.

Quote:
Leptin: Chapter One

Readers Summary
Why is leptin the Master Hormone?
What labs tell you about your leptin status
Leptin’s connection to the brain
Leptin’s relationship to organs energy requirements
Obesity is an inflammatory condition caused by leptin dysregulation not insulin


This was YEARS ago and now the research supporting his assertions are all over the place.
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