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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Dec-27-23, 11:03
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default Appetite for game shoots up among the young as Britain turns its back on veganism

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Appetite for game shoots up among the young as Britain turns its back on veganism

Health-conscious younger generation flock to buy meat such as venison after celebrity chefs extoll health and environmental benefits


The appetite for game has shot up among members of Generation Z following a drive to get young people eating meat such as venison or pheasant.

The British Association for Shooting and Conservation (BASC) has launched a campaign to encourage more people to eat game, which it says is a cheap, sustainable and mineral rich source of low-fat protein.

BASC said its initiatives to get younger people into the previously niche meat have been furthered by celebrity chefs advocating its use.

Butchers nationwide are noticing the growth in interest as Britain turns its back on veganism with industry figures showing overall sales of meat alternatives are down 13.6 per cent over the last year.

Gareth Dockerty, deputy director of shooting and operations at BASC, said: “Game meat ticks so many boxes for consumers today. It’s healthy, sustainable, can be locally-sourced and is delicious.

“It’s a product that has grown in popularity, thanks in part to its versatility, availability, and the enthusiasm shown for it by celebrity chefs. This year alone, we have introduced almost 12,000 people to game meat at shows and events across the UK.”

Mr Dockerty added: “We have seen people of all ages keen to try the taste of game – younger people in particular can be quite adventurous but we have found that a simple venison burger or a game pie can be a great universal leveller.”

‘Young people are wanting to try different things’

Pheasant has more protein, less fat, five times as much iron and three times the selenium of chicken, whilst also having a third less calories, according to BASC.

Venison results in almost thirty times less carbon emission than beef per kilogram, with roe deer creating 0.6 kilograms of CO2 per kilogram of meat compared with 17.12kg/CO2 per kg of meat for beef.

BASC has led more than 40,000 educational classes during its campaign, with around 2,000 children given the chance to try game each summer as part of its upland outdoor education project.

Tim Hanks, who has won Best Butcher in the UK for the last three years, said adventurous, health-conscious young people on a budget are increasingly trying game as an alternative source of protein.

Mr Hanks said: “Health-conscious younger people are looking for cheap and protein-packed food.”

He said getting elderly people interested is actually more difficult, thanks to the huge cultural impact of Bambi on public consciousness in the 20th century.

“Some people, mainly older, have that association with Bambi which deters them from eating game,” Mr Hanks said.

“To get them to try something different you need to give them appealing ways to eat it, like pheasant goujons and wild boar sausages.”

‘The market is changing’

The 38-year-old said the hunger for game is “definitely growing” across the country, with airlines such as British Airways adding game terrine to its in-flight menu and hospitals offering it to patients too.

He said: “It’s definitely growing, there’s a pattern of people wanting more. It’s nationwide. You have people pushing game and more customers wanting it. That’s all new - the market is changing.”

Mr Hanks said he used to sell between one and two carcasses a week in 2018 but now shifts around ten per week.

British Airways was contacted for comment.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...crease-venison/


Good to see
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 07:45
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Venison has always seemed to be more "acceptable" in the UK than in the US.

Growing up on farms, both DH and I were used to at least some game meat. One reason so many people in the US don't care for it is that for way too many hunters, once they've got a deer, hunting is more of an opportunity to drink until everyone in their group has bagged their limit. Even though they gut the deer in the field they just throw it in the back of a truck where it sits until their hunting day is done, before finally taking it to be processed. Even if the temperatures are in the low 40's on hunting day, that means the carcass is still sitting in way too warm of a temperature, with the sun shining on it for hours and hours. In other words, it's not aging, it's actively spoiling. This is why so many people think that venison tastes "gamey". The carcass really needs to be thoroughly chilled as quickly as possible. I've had venison treated both ways, and the one that sits in the back of the pickup truck for hours.... well, there's a good reason they need use very strong marinades on that meat to hide the flavor. The one that is chilled as quickly as possible - that's a very good meat, no marinades necessary at all.

DD1 (a millennial) always called venison "meat without moo" when she was a kid.

She's lived and worked in the UK for more than a decade, and at some point it became too difficult for her to fit in time around her work schedule to go grocery shopping in person. So she ordered from one of the grocery stores that delivered (can't recall which one), and one time when she'd set up delivery for after she got home from work, they included a bunch of venison that she didn't order - there were a bunch of really nice venison steaks in the order. Thinking they'd accidentally put them in the wrong order, she called to ask about it - Turns out that when this particular store got to the end of their day and still had delivery orders to fill, they'd throw in close-dated meats for free. (a real boon to her budget!) That's when she started to really love venison.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 08:37
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Love venison. Not found in the market here. Hunters dont sell it, its for home use. Son and I have recently discussed the value of harvesting a few deer annually for the freezer.

Deer is very lean. Requires careful cooking.

Duck is easier. The muscovy I raise is very lean, cooks quickly and needs some added fat. No marbling. Cooks quickly and no toughness to contend with. As I remember, venison was always tough, like shoe leather.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 09:27
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I buy ground venison in bulk online and then make venison jerky from it. It works better for jerky than ground beef because of its very low fat content. Venison jerky is my go to food to augment my protein intake. If I want a snack I eat some jerky.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 10:08
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I don't remember having venison or pheasant since high school. I did have quite a bit of rabbit for a while.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 14:36
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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A little off topic but, it's amazing how a celebrity chef can influence people. After all the viewers can't taste the meal.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 18:07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Love venison. Not found in the market here. Hunters dont sell it, its for home use. Son and I have recently discussed the value of harvesting a few deer annually for the freezer.



Yep - hunters are not allowed to sell deer in the US. They can give it away though - no trading or bartering either. (Which is how I've ended up with the occasional few pieces of venison from when my DB hunts on the farm)

It is possible to sell venison in the US, but only from deer raised and farmed specifically for that purpose - and it's far more expensive and complicated than raising beef, so it's extremely expensive to buy.

Quote:
Deer is very lean. Requires careful cooking. Duck is easier. The muscovy I raise is very lean, cooks quickly and needs some added fat. No marbling. Cooks quickly and no toughness to contend with. As I remember, venison was always tough, like shoe leather.


My dad used to raise Muscovy ducks. We had duck occasionally when I was a teenager, but my mom hating eating any fat (this was almost 2 decades before the low fat craze - it was just her hating any detectable "grease" at all in food), she'd prick the duck skin all over so that when she roasted it, the fat from the skin would drain away from the meat. I ate the duck meat because it was what we were having for dinner that day, but I was never crazy about it because it was awfully dry being cooked like that.


Someday I wouldn't mind trying some muscovy that's been cooked right.
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Old Thu, Dec-28-23, 22:05
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Frying up a duck breast takes a bit of practise to get it just right. Gosh, just realized it might make a good sausage with lots of added suet.

Hope you get to try duck at a good restaurant.....that is where I first enjoyed duck.

Lots of rule and regulations on meat here in US. I can give away meat but not sell it IF I do the processing. Its very pricey to send to a licenced butcher. Which is why I learned how. My son and I can processes 5-6 sheep on day one and have in freezer vacuum packed by end of day two.

As for price of deer meat, beef prices are artificially low because the processors undercut the ranchers.
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Old Fri, Dec-29-23, 07:17
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I love duck, but have been disappointed about the frozen leg quarters which is all I can get. Not a price point I want to play with. The local Aldi does sell whole ducks, with the holidays, but I was dealing with a flare.

It brought on by the Ibuprofen dose for dental issues and I will never take an NSAID again if I can help it. Now under control but ruined the holidays up to now, really. Oh well, New Year's Eve looks good at last DH was partly sick with worry!
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Old Fri, Dec-29-23, 07:22
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I am always thrilled to hear about veganism losing its ridiculous hold on the public imagination.

Vegans are a public menace, even if someone doesn't go full vegan. They feel guilty about eating animal products, skimp on protein, and wind up malnourished because they aren't getting enough nutrition anyway. It keeps them from pernicious anemia, but not away from processed food.

If anything, that's most of what vegans eat.

They have contributed to corporate interests about promoting processed food, and they have a stranglehold on the dietician education and licensing organization. They are part of the confusion of so many people about what they should eat.
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Old Mon, Jan-22-24, 01:19
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Quote:
Nurseries to serve venison in effort to reduce wild deer numbers

Population is at its highest for a millennium, with an estimated two million deer threatening to destroy woodland and precious wildlife habitats


For the ever-increasing herds of wild deer decimating British woodland and crops, the hunter and his rifle have been the only predator they need fear for more than a century.

Now thousands of nursery school children are joining the fight to control Britain’s soaring deer numbers by eating them for lunch.

Tops Day Nurseries, which looks after 4,000 children across 32 nurseries in Dorset and Hampshire, has become one of the first education establishments to undertake to put wild shot venison on its menus.

Working in collaboration with Eat Wild, the development board for British game, they have developed five dishes that are being served three times a week — some 3,000 meals a month.

The number of wild deer roaming Britain is at its highest for a millennium, with an estimated two million threatening woodland and wildlife habitats.

With no natural predators such as wolves or lynx, the animals can decimate the biodiversity of woodlands by over-foraging the understory, vegetation beneath the canopy that provides a habitat for other wildlife. They can also have a devastating effect on farmers’ crops, descending on fields at night and leaving agricultural businesses with £20,000 a year losses due to deer.

Deer and vehicle collisions result in around £45 million of damage to cars a year, with 75,000 accidents caused by deer, resulting in between 10 and 15 driver deaths each year in the UK.

Between 500,000 and 750,000 wild deer need to be culled each year just to keep the population at a standstill, but currently only 350,000 are killed each year. An overall population of fewer than a million is favoured by conservationists to reduce their economic and ecological impact but the current system is not working.

One of the main factors in controlling deer numbers is the price hunters can get for their carcasses. If there is increased demand for venison then the price will go up and hunters and game dealers will be incentivised to shoot more.

The aim of Eat Wild is to create new markets for the untapped resource, and they are aiming to break into the education sector.

Louisa Clutterbuck, chief executive of Eat Wild, said the venison for the nurseries is sourced from two “very large estates in the South Downs”.

“The deer population is out of control so there is absolutely no problem with supply, there is oversupply at the moment,” she said.

Clutterbuck said the deer population will “only increase with government funding more trees being planted across the country”. The government has pledged to plant 30,000 hectares of trees per year, every year, until 2050.

She said the education sector was a “new market who have never used wild meat before”.

At the moment few hunters will lug many fallow deer out of the woods for £20 from a game dealer. They say it needs to be closer to £60.

Clutterbuck said: “The stalkers barely cover their costs at the moment by selling meat to the game dealer. We are trying to create more demand and rather than people seeing game as a restaurant and very high end, Michelin-star meat, we want it to be served at your local pub and taken home and cooked as a midweek meal. We are also looking at supplying prisons and sports stadiums.”

Before the Covid-19 pandemic there were estimated to be 1.5 million wild deer, with about 80 per cent of the venison shot in the UK going to restaurants or the hospitality trade.

However, those sectors struggled during lockdowns and social distancing and demand for venison collapsed. With deer stalkers not culling as many animals their population boomed.

Leon Challis-Davies, culinary director at Eat Wild, who is leading the project with Tops Nurseries, said: “It’s so important that we get the younger generation to eat more nutritional and vitamin-rich food to help them develop.

“Wild meat is not only healthier, but it’s also more sustainable than what we consume from our current meat-producing sector. It’s much more flavoursome too. For the countryside community in particular, this is a huge win, and we hope to take it to the next level and introduce wild meat into higher education and beyond.”
Venison is high in B vitamins, protein and iron, very low in fat and a source of essential Omega 3 acids, making it one of the healthiest and sustainable meats.

Peter Ttofis, catering manager for Tops Nurseries, said: “We decided to create fun and vibrant dishes from around the world using wild food. Dishes like venison bolognaise or venison orzo bake will make their way onto our menus, giving the children their first tastes of game and a gateway to new nutritional flavours.”

Eat Wild is not the only organisation trying to tap into new markets for wild meat.

Forestry England, which manages about 1,500 woodlands, culled around 16,000 deer last year and has begun supplying venison shot on its land to online customers and hospitals.

By working in partnership with Highland Game, the game dealership, Forestry England has sold 6.5 tonnes of venison to four north west NHS trusts and they are in advanced discussions with five more London NHS trusts.

They first began supplying East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust in 2021 with venison culled 13 miles away in the Forest of Bowland and Grizedale.

In the first year of the partnership the hospital’s venison and winter vegetable pie and venison and mash casserole were consistently the most chosen items by patients.

Forestry England venison can also be found in retailers across the UK and in Gousto, Mindful Chef and HelloFresh meal boxes.

They have also formed a partnership with Farm Wilder, a non-profit organisation promoting nature-friendly farming, to sell wild venison direct to customers from its forests in southwest England through the Farm Wilder website.

Forestry England is part of the working group which has developed the British quality wild venison standard, which was launched in April 2023.

The standard aims to guarantee traceability of wild venison and ensure a set of standards are met throughout the supply chain.

Jim Lee, wildlife manager for Forestry England, said: “This will build consumer and retailer confidence in a meat which, too often, people feel is not for them.

“We would like to see more venison available in retailers and via public sector procurement so that more people can benefit from eating wild venison and by doing so grow the health of our woodlands.”

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...mbers-5xwwzjpdp
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Jan-22-24, 02:35
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WereBear WereBear is online now
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Quote:
“Wild meat is not only healthier, but it’s also more sustainable than what we consume from our current meat-producing sector. It’s much more flavoursome too. For the countryside community in particular, this is a huge win, and we hope to take it to the next level and introduce wild meat into higher education and beyond.”


Venison is a staple here. People have freezers full of it. And it's not easy on the deer to starve to death because they have no predators.
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Old Mon, Jan-22-24, 08:31
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The number of wild deer roaming Britain is at its highest for a millennium, with an estimated two million threatening woodland and wildlife habitats.

With no natural predators such as wolves or lynx, the animals can decimate the biodiversity of woodlands by over-foraging the understory, vegetation beneath the canopy that provides a habitat for other wildlife. They can also have a devastating effect on farmers’ crops, descending on fields at night and leaving agricultural businesses with £20,000 a year losses due to deer.

Deer and vehicle collisions result in around £45 million of damage to cars a year, with 75,000 accidents caused by deer, resulting in between 10 and 15 driver deaths each year in the UK.

Between 500,000 and 750,000 wild deer need to be culled each year just to keep the population at a standstill, but currently only 350,000 are killed each year. An overall population of fewer than a million is favoured by conservationists to reduce their economic and ecological impact but the current system is not working.


I can't even imagine what the numbers are like here in the US with so much more forested and agricultural land here.

The financial loss attributed to crop damage sounds more like the numbers for maybe a couple of moderately sized farms in the US. (or did they mean £20,000 loss per farm?)

Car accidents and vehicle damage - if the number of deer carcasses I often see by the side of the road in the fall is any indication, those are probably closer to the totals for individual states in the US (Although it would depend on the size and population of the state - fewer cars, fewer accidents overall, even if there are more deer in the largest, mostly rural states)


WB is right - the deer are also starving to death, at least during the dead of winter when the crops have all been harvested, and about the only thing left for them to eat is tree bark and poison ivy vines.

There's also the spread of several deadly diseases among the deer due to overpopulation - Chronic wasting disease, hemorrhagic fever, etc.
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Old Tue, Jan-23-24, 17:11
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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We gigged at a New Year's Day party for some French Canadians wintering here in Florida. After the gig they fed us a traditional Quebec New Year's Day meal.

It was moose, rabbit, and boar cooked with potatoes with a bread-like crust. It was quite good.

I don't think I'm going to get much more moose meat here in Florida though.
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Old Wed, Jan-24-24, 04:19
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Game has always been a big menu item in the mountains, which is where I live. Lower down is apple country, but we are known for a farm which has many heirloom potato varieties, and supply the greens for local restaurants. (One of the reasons we do sometimes eat out.)

But the only reason it exists is the plateau that farm is on, geographically. A famous experiment also tried to relocate freed slaves after the war, and give them farms locally, but there wasn't much to choose from. Actual farming takes place much closer to the border of Canada.

Though many of them turned to other routes, such as guiding, shooting meat for the many resort hotels in the area, or fishing, in the many trout rivers. Not like there isn't food in our mountains.

Just not farming.

Also, we buy local meat when we can, because we want to encourage local producers. The extra money is worth it, because of the extra flavor -- which, I am convinced, has extra nutrients. Taste is a signal, and it can also be manipulated.

But the real thing always tastes better.
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