Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Mon, Dec-18-23, 01:16
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 26,565
 
Plan: Muscle Centric
Stats: 238/153/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: UK
Default Hospital admissions linked to obesity have doubled in six years in the UK

Quote:
Revealed: Obesity linked to 3,000 ward admissions a day

Poorer areas of England are worst affected


Hospital admissions linked to obesity have doubled in six years to more than 3,000 people a day, according to NHS figures that highlight the extent of Britain’s weight problem.

Obesity is exacerbating illness or complicating the treatment of people ranging from expectant mothers to patients with arthritis and cancer. There are three times as many admissions linked to obesity as there are to smoking. More than 20 children a day are admitted because of obesity, a figure that has also doubled in recent years.

Ministers have been accused of failing to get a grip on a problem that is damaging society and holding back the economy after the government shelved tough anti-obesity measures.

People in poorer areas are twice as likely to be taken into hospital with obesity as those in the richest areas, in the latest evidence that weight issues are hampering efforts to boost the labour market.

Luton is the area of England with the biggest health toll from obesity, with one hospital admission linked to weight for every 20 residents last year, more than ten times the rate in Bracknell Forest, at the bottom of the table.

Figures published this month showed the cost of obesity to be an estimated £98 billion a year, which included £19 billion of NHS treatment and economic productivity losses of £15 billion.

The latest NHS Digital figures for England show a record 1.2 million ~admissions where obesity was a factor in 2022-23, up from 617,000 in 2016-17. This includes 8,716 occasions when obesity was the primary reason for ~admission, often for bariatric surgery, and hundreds of thousands more when obesity was a secondary diagnosis ~either contributing to a stay in hospital or complicating treatment.

Pregnant women are the most likely to have obesity as a complicating problem, with 147,143 maternity admissions where obesity was a problem for either mother or child. Arthritis, gallstones, breast cancer, heart disease and general pain were all involved in more than 10,000 annual admissions each.

Daisy Cooper, the Liberal Democrat deputy leader, said: “Ministers have squandered numerous opportunities to make the UK a healthier place to live, instead choosing to kick the can down the road time and again. All this is having a huge impact on people’s wellbeing, not to mention on our NHS and economy. Investing in improving public health would not only reduce pressure on the NHS, it would help get more people back to work and boost our economy.”

While older people are more likely to require hospital treatment, the figures include 8,261 admissions among under-16s, up from 4,062 in 2016-17. In the most deprived ten areas there were 3,393 admissions per 100,000 people for obesity, more than twice the 1,430 in the richest tenth.

Luton had 4,880 per 100,000, with Gloucestershire, Southampton, Salford, Rotherham, Bradford and much of east London all having rates above 4,000. Bracknell Forest in Berkshire had an admission rate of 420 per 100,000, while Windsor, Wokingham, Slough, Oxfordshire, Reading and Brighton all had rates below 1,000.

Luton is among the country’s more deprived and most diverse boroughs and, in recognition of its high obesity rate, recently announced a ban on ~advertising unhealthy food on council-owned billboards and other property. The rise in obesity-related ~admissions is likely to represent, at least in part, growing medical awareness of the range of conditions excess weight can cause. Local variations in recording obesity will also affect how areas rank.

Victoria Atkins, the health secretary, has said she wanted to focus on healthy-living advice and was said to be sceptical of what she has described as “nanny-statish” measures, in comments that have dismayed health ~campaigners.

Cooper urged ministers to revive plans for a 9pm watershed on junk food advertising and a ban on buy-one-get-one-free deals on unhealthy food, both of which have been kicked into the long grass, as well as to give councils more cash for public health initiatives.

Weight-loss surgery has yet to return to pre-pandemic levels, with 5,099 admissions last year, compared with more than 6,000 five years ago, which some have attributed to pressures on the NHS.

This has meant admissions where the main reason is obesity have yet to return to levels of more than 10,000 seen before Covid-19. However, 638 children under 16 were admitted primarily for obesity, almost as many as before the pandemic.

A government spokesman pointed to compulsory calorie labelling and healthy food vouchers for poorer households, saying: “We are taking strong action to encourage healthier food choices and to tackle obes~ity across all socio-economic groups and in deprived areas, recognising that it is the second biggest cause of cancer.”
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...0-day-5wrsvtrxb

Quote:
The Times view on Britain’s growing waistlines: Obesity Epidemic

More and more Britons, especially the young and poor, are overweight. The government must be more proactive in saving the many lives lost to obesity


More than 3,000 people a day are admitted to hospital in England with conditions linked to obesity — double the figure six years ago. This awful statistic underlines the huge toll that obesity is taking on the nation’s health. Even more shocking are recent figures showing that more than 20 children a day are hospitalised because of obesity, and that ill health caused by being overweight is costing the country £98 billion a year. The NHS spends £19 billion a year treating those who are too fat, and the associated lost productivity costs the ~economy £15 billion a year.

For several years there have been warnings that Britons are eating too much of the wrong kinds of food. Some 28 per cent of the population is now obese, one of the highest rates in Europe. The condition is especially harmful to pregnant women and those suffering from arthritis, cancer and diabetes. According to NHS figures, obesity now leads to three times as many hospital admissions as smoking — a sharp reminder that although the drop in smoking rates, especially among young people, has been impressive, this recent danger to people’s health has received far less publicity and is one that especially affects the young.

Public concern has been growing, but there has been a shamefully slow response from the government, the food industry and the general public. Obesity not only damages the nation’s health, it is also a political issue, because it exacerbates inequality. The NHS figures clearly demonstrate that obesity particularly affects those on lower incomes, because ultra-processed “junk” food — proven to be a prime cause of obesity — is much cheaper than fruit, vegetables and the ingredients that make for a healthy diet. Those areas where obesity is most prevalent are overwhelmingly poorer towns and communities, with Luton coming top of the list and east London and northern cities also having among the worst results. By contrast, more prosperous areas such as Bracknell Forest, Windsor and Maidenhead and Wokingham have far fewer hospital admissions associated with obesity.In the most deprived ten areas there were 3,393 admissions per 100,000 people, more than twice the figure of 1,430 in the richest tenth.

Since 1992 there have been sporadic attempts to legislate to reduce the most obvious causes. A levy on soft drinks was introduced in 2018 to push manufacturers to add less sugar to their products. Shops have been banned from offering get-one-free deals on unhealthy foods, and are urged not to display sugar, fattening foods and snacks in prominent positions. Luckily, most shops no longer place snacks, sweets and comfort food right next to checkouts.

So far the government has resisted putting a ~direct tax on sugar. In itself, such a tax would not be especially effective and would seem to be more of a token move. But the government has also, regrettably, retreated from most of the proactive anti-obesity measures mooted recently. Victoria Atkins, the health secretary, says she wants to focus instead on promoting healthy living, and is said to be sceptical of “nanny-state” legislation. If so, there is still plenty to do. Plans, now shelved, to revive a 9pm television watershed for junk food advertising should be brought back. There should be a massive public campaign, equivalent to the hard-hitting anti-smoking measures, to stop children and their parents grazing on snacks. And councils should be given money to fund local ~initiatives. Perhaps farmers could be subsidised for growing vegetables and healthy foods that are less expensive.

Obesity is a global issue, largely affecting richer nations. The main culprits are the food industry, which profits hugely from processed and fast food. The World Health Organisation says that at least 2.8 million people die each year as a result of obesity. Fewer of those should be in Britain.

Share

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...demic-vj8rx3fg5
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Mon, Dec-18-23, 05:36
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,740
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/167/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 116%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default Lots of non-action

Governments have allowed, and somewhat encouraged, the corporate food industries to take over people's lives. People no longer prepare and cook food at home. A lot of the food eaten at home is either bought at fast food establishments or purchased ready to eat after heating.
In the US, school lunches are just a mass of carbs with little nutrition so children get calories and stay hungry.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Mon, Dec-18-23, 09:46
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 1,764
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

From the first article:
Quote:
People in poorer areas are twice as likely to be taken into hospital with obesity as those in the richest areas, in the latest evidence that weight issues are hampering efforts to boost the labour market.

Quote:
Daisy Cooper, the Liberal Democrat deputy leader, said: “Ministers have squandered numerous opportunities to make the UK a healthier place to live, instead choosing to kick the can down the road time and again. All this is having a huge impact on people’s wellbeing, not to mention on our NHS and economy. Investing in improving public health would not only reduce pressure on the NHS, it would help get more people back to work and boost our economy.”

Quote:
A government spokesman pointed to compulsory calorie labelling and healthy food vouchers for poorer households, saying: “We are taking strong action to encourage healthier food choices and to tackle obes~ity across all socio-economic groups and in deprived areas, recognising that it is the second biggest cause of cancer.”


And from the 2nd article:

Quote:
For several years there have been warnings that Britons are eating too much of the wrong kinds of food.

Quote:
Since 1992 there have been sporadic attempts to legislate to reduce the most obvious causes. A levy on soft drinks was introduced in 2018 to push manufacturers to add less sugar to their products. Shops have been banned from offering get-one-free deals on unhealthy foods, and are urged not to display sugar, fattening foods and snacks in prominent positions. Luckily, most shops no longer place snacks, sweets and comfort food right next to checkouts.

So far the government has resisted putting a ~direct tax on sugar. In itself, such a tax would not be especially effective and would seem to be more of a token move. But the government has also, regrettably, retreated from most of the proactive anti-obesity measures mooted recently. Victoria Atkins, the health secretary, says she wants to focus instead on promoting healthy living, and is said to be sceptical of “nanny-state” legislation. If so, there is still plenty to do. Plans, now shelved, to revive a 9pm television watershed for junk food advertising should be brought back. There should be a massive public campaign, equivalent to the hard-hitting anti-smoking measures, to stop children and their parents grazing on snacks. And councils should be given money to fund local ~initiatives. Perhaps farmers could be subsidised for growing vegetables and healthy foods that are less expensive.


My take on much of this is that they're blaming poor people for being poor enough to need to stretch their food budget with BOGO deals.

When I worked in a grocery store, I saw every day what poor people buy to eat - they get in on the BOGO deals as much as possible for non-perishables (because they're much easier to store than perishables), and when they still reach the limit of what they can afford, they start taking meat off their order, because the 2-for-$1 deal on packets of seasoned pasta or rice will cover at least 2 meals, whereas $4 would only provide enough meat for 1 meal. (And they had usually picked up the family sized package of meat to get the better price per pound, so the package of meat was at least $8-$10, which threw them waaaay off budget)

But the point is that the super cheap pasta/rice/potato side dish was so much less expensive that they'd make do with that for some meals, and fill out a skimpy meal with other cheap junk food. Vegetables are also relatively expensive by comparison to pasta, rice, and potatoes, especially fresh vegetables, with frozen vegetables sometimes far more expensive, sometimes a little less expensive per pound than fresh. But fresh vegetables have a very short shelf life, so they didn't buy many of those because they wouldn't keep. Cooking and refrigerator/freezer facilities and cooking utensils also influence their ability to do much with any vegetables at all.

Or meat in general for that matter - but the poor tend to think of buying and cooking meat as more of a luxury than simply going to McD's and getting a burger from the dollar menu. Even if the fast food burger has less meat per dollar than the fresh homemade burger would, they're getting a larger overall volume of food (burger, bun, toppings) than if they cooked burgers and had to buy a package of buns, and all those toppings too.

But back to those articles, they're not defining "healthy living" or "healthy food", but by saying that farmers should be subsidized to grow vegetables (because they're less expensive) and "healthy food" instead of what they're currently growing - Well, they're still not defining healthy food, but certainly implying that produce is the primary healthy food. And sorry, but it's not less expensive than most junky convenience foods.

On the topic of wanting farmers to grow more vegetables, when we visited our daughter who lives in Norwich, England, in 2019, we took the train between London and Norwich, and a few days later from Norwich to Manchester, then on to Liverpool, then back to Norwich and finally back to London. We traveled past a lot of farms on those trains. I recall seeing a couple of chicken farms, and one hog farm (I'm vaguely remembering seeing cattle too), but far more farms that grew vegetables. I don't recall seeing any grain farms at all. That doesn't mean that grain farms don't exist in England, only that I didn't happen to see any grain farms from the train, but saw many growing vegetables, while only seeing a couple of livestock operations.

So if what they're suggesting is that farmers convert from livestock farming to vegetable farming - because it's healthier food than whatever else is being raised - sorry, but it really doesn't appear that most farmers there are growing anything other than "healthy" food, which seems to mean only vegetables. There's a relatively short growing season in England - spring weather starts much later and fall weather begins much earlier than than it does in much of the US, so there's going to be a lot of vegetables that they just can't grow - unless they're short season varieties. (Keep in mind that livestock can be raised year-round, and that there's a lot of land which is quite suitable for raising livestock, but will be extremely difficult to grow any plants - particularly rocky farmland suitable for pastures, or soil that has a high clay content)

As far as converting farmland from livestock to crops of any kind... let's see, first the farmer will need to sell off all their livestock, and remove all of the livestock shelters. Next they need to invest hundreds of thousands on equipment to plow, disc, harrow, till, plant, treat, and harvest the crops (not sure what they're supposed to do with all the equipment they had to raise livestock - apparently throw that out just like they're apparently supposed to do with the livestock shelters). Don't forget to have the soil analyzed to determine if you need to let areas of the farm rest for a few years due to too much "natural fertilizer" build-up in certain areas, or if you need to spend a few years building up the nutrients in the soil in some areas to properly grow a crop. Then choose varieties of crops that will grow quickly enough to mature in England's short summers, get those planted, hope it rains enough for them to grow (but not so much that it causes the seed to rot in the ground) and that a wind storm, blight, insects, crop disease, or other natural disaster doesn't destroy the crop. Then get everything harvested as soon as it's ripe, before it goes to seed... Wait - Do they have enough experienced farm harvest workers to do all that in a timely manner?

They make it sound like all it requires to grow more veggies and make them cheap is to just throw a little money at the farmers - it's going to take a lot more than just a[I] little money, and boom, everyone will lose weight.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Mon, Dec-18-23, 12:02
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
Forum Founder
Posts: 37,178
 
Plan: LC paleo/ancestral
Stats: 241/189/140 Female 165 cm
BF:
Progress: 51%
Location: Eastern ON, Canada
Default

They might also want to take a look at improving the cheap, processed carb-slop they serve to patients in hospitals disguised as "food"
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Tue, Dec-19-23, 09:09
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,514
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/125/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 136%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen T
They might also want to take a look at improving the cheap, processed carb-slop they serve to patients in hospitals disguised as "food"


That's the key. It's CHEAP.

While more and more science shows a radical difference in nutrients between animal based and plant-based. Those simple tests of old found nutrients, but now we know if they aren't bioavailable, they might as well not be food.

It's cheaper and easier to grow GMO plants they can then drench with Round-Up. And they do.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:43.


Copyright © 2000-2024 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.