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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Dec-13-23, 01:56
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Ultra-processed foods ‘hijacking children’s tastebuds’

Quote:
Ultra-processed foods ‘hijacking children’s tastebuds’

Chefs and campaigners say youngsters are being ‘robbed of the experience’ of good meals by diets high in sugar, salt and additives


Ultra-processed foods are hijacking children’s taste buds and leaving them “robbed” of the experience of learning to eat, according to campaigners and TV chefs.

Celebrity cooks and authors including Thomasina Miers, Bee Wilson, Yotam Ottolenghi, Kimberley Wilson and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall have written to Rishi Sunak to say that exposure to ultra-processed foods is “blindfolding” children to flavour and texture, posing long-term risks to their health.

Ultra-processed foods, which include breakfast cereals, mass-produced bread, potato-based snacks such as Pringles and many types of cakes and biscuits. They are often high in salt and sugar, contain additives, emulsifiers and preservatives, and are typically high in calories but lacking in fibre and nutrients.

Rob Percival, head of food policy at the Soil Association, said: “Ultra-processed foods are hijacking children’s taste buds. These products are often soft and sweet, and children growing up on an ultra-processed diet are left blindfolded to the joys and complexity of real food … Too few know the taste of bitter greens or the nutty flavour of beans and lentils, or have felt the crunch of a tomato bursting on their tongue.”

In a campaign with the food charity, the chefs are urging the prime minister to ensure a million extra children in education get five portions of fruit and vegetables a day , using a “whole school approach” to good food with sensory education and better school meals.

They say: “Learning to eat should be an adventure — joyful and challenging — but our children are increasingly being robbed of the experience. Many are growing up not knowing the tastes, textures, and smells of real food. Many will rarely feel fresh produce between their fingers. Many will enter adulthood only knowing the simplified and sweet flavours of ultra-processed products, leading to unhealthy choices and poorer health outcomes later in life.”

In an accompanying report the charity calls on the government to revive previous commitments to ensure school pupils cook and grow food, visit farms and eat freshly prepared meals, as envisaged in Henry Dimbleby’s national food strategy.

He resigned as government food tsar this year in protest at a lack of action to tackle rising obesity, particularly among children.

Independent evaluation suggests that if all schools in England followed this approach, a million more children would be eating their five-a-day.

The report also calls for procurement standards for school caterers that require them to use more organic and seasonal produce.

It adds that the government should introduce a target to reduce ultra-processed food in children’s diets by boosting consumption of minimally processed fruits, vegetables and pulses.

Dr Chris van Tulleken, one of the letter’s signatories, is author of Ultra Processed People, a book released earlier this year. He said: “Growing up on an ultra-processed diet is a bit like growing up blindfolded — cut off from the colours and complexity of real food. It’s fantastic to see that pioneering schools are beginning to address this disconnect, employing practical food education and serving freshly prepared meals. Political action is now needed to ensure all schools can do so.”

A recent report from First Steps Nutrition Trust said that high levels of ultra-processed food consumption in infancy “undermines taste development”. The standard diet of very young children normalised snacking, sweet tastes and soft textures, it said, and was at risk of displacing other less processed options necessary for growth, health and development.

A government spokesperson said: “We are taking strong action to tackle childhood obesity by cutting the salt and sugar content in foods and encouraging healthier food choices. We’ve already delivered dramatic sugar reductions in children’s foods like breakfast cereals, yogurts and fromage frais, whilst our calorie labelling legislation empowers informed food choices.

“Food is already a compulsory topic within the national curriculum for 5–14-year-olds in state-maintained schools, with children receiving high quality teaching on the importance of healthy eating and nutrition.

“We are also committed to ensuring children leave school knowing how to cook at least six healthy meals through using curriculum materials that the Oak National Academy are developing. Oak has appointed a subject expert and will start their work on producing these materials in the coming months.”


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...ebuds-jv7wf32g7
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Dec-13-23, 13:39
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
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No crap food in my house!!

Real food. Its easy. Keep it simple.

Roast up a pan of chicken legs. Micro wave frozen peas. Nuke a potato. Cut up an apple.

I had to do easy to feed my children. And then they learned about crap food at school.

My kids were taught how to cook. How to help with meal prep. At 20 and 21 BOTH my boys can cook.

Or cut off a chunk of cheese from a 2# block of cheddar!

Mcnugget style meat is not meat. Its breading and fats with a trace of meat. Once I figured that out.....gone. A pan of chicken legs cooks in under an hour, and the extras are for another meal.

The cheap crap " foods" are lethal to a thinking brain, to good mood, to our mental health.

Salt and sugar is the tip of the iceburg. Just feed realfood. Thank you dr Atkins.

Make meat loaf.


This was regular fare.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Dec-14-23, 05:12
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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One McNugget has 2.3g net carbs, 2.5g fat and 2.4g protein…hits that magic carb + fat combo for Optimum Fattening.

Last edited by JEY100 : Thu, Dec-14-23 at 07:49.
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Dec-14-23, 10:39
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish/Keto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
One McNugget has 2.3g net carbs, 2.5g fat and 2.4g protein…hits that magic carb + fat combo for Optimum Fattening.
And you can dip them in ketchup for more carbs.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Dec-16-23, 06:20
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WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
And you can dip them in ketchup for more carbs.


Oh, they have a variety of sugary sauces to choose from. And BBQ is often ridiculously sweet. I see bottled sauces where the sweetener is the second ingredient.

We now KNOW these processed combinations re-shape the brain's appetite center. It gets larger the more a person eats these artificial foods.

The thing is, some of it is not their fault. These have been crafted to be addictive substances. Dr. Atkins got me off the carbs, and that IS the answer. While it might take the longest to kill you, compared to alcohol or opiates, carb addiction makes our lives tortuous and expensive.

And finally there is research about how it affects your brain. I can tell. I was dumber and less mood stable on carbs. I know I'm not alone.

It is unrecognised how this might be a public health issue for others who are eating real food. Our chubby/angry friends or family members can't help but inflict their issues on us. The seeming futility only makes sufferers more angry. We've all been there, doing what we're told, and failing miserably, and being miserable.

Here in the US, I have come to believe certain regions of the country are suffering extra from the double whammy of crushing work which doesn't pay enough, and subtle undermining of even the ability to acquire and cook real food. If someone is in an economically depressed state (and our states make up a lot of their own rules) such places also become known for their love of junk food AND a lack of health care infrastructure.

So people are suffering the most in places where it's even more difficult to eat real food. I was watching a Youtube when the creator had recently moved several states. She and her family were stunned at how difficult it was to get to a grocery store (Wal-Mart is known to drive out competition and then site megacenters) so people in rural areas have to drive up to fifty miles to get groceries.

And she said, "And every foot of the highway that we have to drive is a place to turn around, get fast food, and go home. I don't blame all those people who do that. It's hard not to do that!"

And I agree. I can get to a grocery store within five minutes in either direction. The other day I picked up groceries for a sick neighbor, because it's easy to do favors like that. I have an actual kitchen but a lot of shared living situations creates issues around kitchen cleaning and maintenance.

The time shift between the two in terms of effort has an incredible pull.

All these factors drive people from their homes and their reasons to be there.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Dec-21-23, 06:26
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Plan: P:E/DDF
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Location: NC
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Quote:
A government spokesperson said: “We are taking strong action to tackle childhood obesity by cutting the salt and sugar content in foods and encouraging healthier food choices. We’ve already delivered dramatic sugar reductions in children’s foods like breakfast cereals, yogurts and fromage frais, whilst our calorie labelling legislation empowers informed food choices.
about this claim of dramatically reducing "sugar"…that was easy to deal with…substitute non nutritive sweeteners!

How fake sugars sneak into foods and disrupt metabolic health

Artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes sweeten foods without extra calories. But studies show the ingredients can affect gut and heart health.


Info on artificial sweeteners and the "natural ones", e.g. Monkfruit and stevia, hiding in our processed foods.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/well...M6Rdg&itid=gfta

Last edited by JEY100 : Thu, Dec-21-23 at 07:29.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Dec-21-23, 22:06
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Maybe it's just me, but I don't consider those sweeteners to be hiding at all. Then again, I've been reading ingredient labels since I was in my 20's.

I started reading them in the 70's when I was on LC.

Even thought I ended up going off and on LC for a few years in the 70's, I still read ingredient labels.

When I was off LC for a couple of decades, I still read ingredient labels, because one thing that being on LC for a couple of years had taught me was that certain sweeteners (primarily sugar alcohols) did not play nicely with my digestive tract. Even when I didn't care if what I was buying had a pile of sugar in it, I still checked to make sure there were no sugar alcohols in it.


One thing I have a problem with in the WP info (aside from it being presented in such a cutesy manner) is that they list all these horrible effects that any non-sugar sweetener can have on your gut, your brain, and your health - even monkfruit and stevia, which are naturally occurring sweeteners that have been used for hundreds of years, and yet suddenly they're included in this artificial sweetener horror story.

Besides, didn't it come out at some point that the way they came to the conclusion that artificial sweeteners would affect your gut health was by observing how they affected gut cells in a petri dish? And also using the sweeteners at such high concentrations that a human would need to eat several pounds of the pure form of the sweetener daily to make it remotely possible to see any of those effects on their gut. As opposed to observing how it affected the gut health of actual humans who had consumed the sweetener, even in what would be high amounts, such as the individual who drank dozens of sugar free sodas daily, along with using those sweeteners in many of their foods every day.

But that brings up the way that they list how much sweeter all the artificial sweeteners are than sugar - is that really a factor in how they affect you? Just because they're all hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, that doesn't mean you're using hundreds of times as much sucralose or stevia as you used to use of sugar. I use pure stevia - there's nothing in it to extend it. If I used even 1/10 the same amount of stevia in a recipe as the recipe says to use of sugar, it would be too impossibly sweet to eat. The same is true of any purified form of the other sweeteners - sucralose is as much as 700 times sweeter than sugar, hence you use approximately 1/700 as much of the actual sucralose. That would be impossible to measure though, so they extend the sucralose (and other super concentrated sweeteners) by adding enough maltodextrin to it to make it possible to measure it "just like sugar".



Don't get me wrong - I think the amount of sugar being added to most foods on the market is just appalling (especially the foods that don't need any sweetening to begin with), and switching to a different sweetener without making it obvious on the front of the package what they're using instead is bordering on bait and switch/false advertising.

I realize something needs to be done to reduce the amount of sugar in all those foods, and I agree that switching to a concentrated sweetener isn't helping. The general public has become so out of touch with the way real food tastes though, and they're going to stop buying their favorite sweet foods if they're made less sweet... and switch to something else that's as sweet as they like it.
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Dec-23-23, 05:25
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Plan: P:E/DDF
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I was thinking about my beef with "Keto" Products. I don’t buy them but cruise the multi-aisle snack section at Costco to check out the latest ingredients. A recent offering are the NOSUGARKeto Bars (that is the actual name in large letters) in fudge brownie, chocolate chip, etc. from the what else, TheNOSugarCompany.

On ingredients list, well before the stevia, is Erythritol, Inulin, various processed fibers and such tasty bits as "IsomaltoOliogosaccharide Fiber". No idea what it is, but it sounds sweet. And these Keto bars keep you in ketosis" and are "plant-based" so all the buzz words on one box! That whole section is filled with sugary snack foods that make the parent purchaser feel good about the junk they are buying for their kids.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Dec-23-23, 05:29
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
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Progress: 136%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
The general public has become so out of touch with the way real food tastes though, and they're going to stop buying their favorite sweet foods if they're made less sweet... and switch to something else that's as sweet as they like it.


They have been reformulating all the foods to contain artificial sweetener because that's cheaper. But it's also further away from real food, which they use all kinds of emulsifiers and artificial flavors and such to make it seem like food.

When I was learning baking I had people eat a slice of MY cake, hand beaten with real butter and cake flour. They would fall over. Now, the standard has fallen so far cake no longer even tastes like cake. It's now a chemical confection which over-promises and under-delivers.

Real food is serious competition to their profits, no?
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Dec-23-23, 07:17
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
I was thinking about my beef with "Keto" Products. I don’t buy them but cruise the multi-aisle snack section at Costco to check out the latest ingredients. A recent offering are the NOSUGARKeto Bars (that is the actual name in large letters) in fudge brownie, chocolate chip, etc. from the what else, TheNOSugarCompany.

On ingredients list, well before the stevia, is Erythritol, Inulin, various processed fibers and such tasty bits as "IsomaltoOliogosaccharide Fiber". No idea what it is, but it sounds sweet. And these Keto bars keep you in ketosis" and are "plant-based" so all the buzz words on one box! That whole section is filled with sugary snack foods that make the parent purchaser feel good about the junk they are buying for their kids.

I recall at some point several months ago, Costco had all the LC/Keto stuff grouped together in one or two aisles in the middle of the store. It was almost mind boggling how much there was. I looked at a couple of the packages just out of curiosity as to how in the world they were making all these typical snack foods Keto. And it was very much like the ingredients you listed there.

Out of curiosity, I googled IsomaltoOliogosaccharide Fiber, and this is just a sampling of the info that came up in the little blurbs below the links, and a few from the section of common questions about it:

Quote:
In the United States, IMO is used mostly as a source of dietary fiber. However, IMO is also used as a low calorie sweetener in a variety of foods like bakery .

So fiber - another buzz word that is no doubt is big and bold on the package.

Quote:
What are the side effects of Isomaltooligosaccharide? However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recommended a maximum consumption of 30 g/day for IMO. Higher dosages (greater than 40 g/day), can cause gastrointestinal symptoms like flatulence, bloating, soft stool or diarrhea.

Lovely, just what everyone wants!

Quote:
Is Isomaltooligosaccharide a sugar? IMO Stands for Isomaltooligosaccharide. IMO is a mixture of short-chain carbohydrates and has a digestion-resistant property. Isomalto-oligosaccharides are a normal part of the human diet and occur naturally in fermented foods – such as rice miso, soy sauce, and sake.

Perfectly natural... nothing to see here!

Quote:
What are the benefits of Isomaltooligosaccharide? Isomaltooligosaccharide - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics This product is supplied to the food industries as a low-calorie, bulk sweetener and as a general food ingredient. IMO is found to be effective at increasing the number of Bifidobacteria and lactate and at improving the intestinal microflora in general and is therefore safe to categorize as a prebiotic (FDA, 2005a).

Oh look, another buzz word!
Quote:
Is IMO keto friendly? In small trials, healthy adults experienced dramatic increases in blood sugar and insulin levels after consuming IMO. For this reason, we don't recommend using products that contain isomalto-oligosaccharide on a keto or low-carb diet.


So... not really good for keeping you in ketosis after all.
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