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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Nov-14-23, 17:25
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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I'm opposed to weight loss drugs, at least for me.

I'm not opposed to candy sweetened with Stevia, if eaten in moderation. At least for me.

Nestle is jumping on the bandwagon. That's what corporations do.

The main job of a corporation is to increase profits every quarter. It needs perpetual growth, or the stockholders will jump ship. Perpetual growth is unattainable in a closed system, which IMO the world is in the shape it is today. I see this as a problem and as much as I've thought about it, I have no idea how to fix it.

So people will buy Ozempic and suffer the side-effects, and people will eat Kit-Kats, and Big Pharma and Nestle will reward their stockholders with a little growth.

Me? I try to find pleasure in my daily life, take care of myself, eat sensibly, and do no drugs if there is a more natural way to solve any maladies that affect me.

To each their own.
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  #17   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-24, 08:38
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Have we seen this story before? (I can't find it - feel free to delete if we have it on here already)

Quote:

Bosses of the world’s biggest food companies have for months been sounding the alarm on the ways appetite suppressant Ozempic could hurt their products. Now some CEOs appear to be so spooked that they’ve gone straight to its developer, Novo Nordisk, in search of reassurance.

Speaking to Bloomberg, Novo boss Lars Fruergaard Jørgensen said he was fielding calls from bosses of food companies who have been caught in the crosshairs of a global weight loss phenomenon.

“A couple of CEOs from, say, food companies have been calling me,” Jørgensen told Bloomberg.

“They are scared about it.”

But the drugmaker's CEO is unlikely to be too concerned about how weight-loss aids will hurt junk food suppliers' bottom line, and instead more worried about how he can get more of the drugs into shoppers’ nightstands.
CEOs running scared

Jørgensen didn’t name which CEOs had been in touch, or the agenda of the conversations, be it strategy, regulation, or competitiveness. A representative for Novo didn't immediately respond to Fortune's request for comment.

But it’s easy to create a long list of potential candidates who made the call based on comments shared with the media in recent months. Warnings have tended to come from companies that make highly calorific products like fast food, snacks, and desserts.

Hein Schumacher, the boss of Ben & Jerry’s maker Unilever, did however rule himself out of that lineup when speaking to Bloomberg TV Thursday.

Novo’s Ozempic has enjoyed a cultural breakthrough over the last 18 months after its GLP-1 diabetes drug was found to aid weight loss. A seal of approval from Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who said he was using the drug for his own weight loss journey, helped popularize it to the masses.

Since then, the Danish pharmaceutical group’s profile has only grown as the bosses of major retailers and food suppliers took the time to name-drop Ozempic in their earnings calls.

The first was Walmart’s U.S. boss John Furner, who said in October that the company was already beginning to see a material impact on its sales thanks to its Ozempic-using customers.

“We definitely do see a slight change compared to the total population, we do see a slight pullback in overall basket,” Furner said. “Just less units, slightly less calories.”

Calls to Jørgensen may have also come from fast food companies, with short interest in chains like McDonald's, Chipotle, and Starbucks rising in October last year.

Other CEOs have sought to reassure investors that they have a plan if a surge of Ozempic take-up changes the junk food industry forever.

People using appetite suppressants are expected to change their dietary preferences in favor of lower-calorie alternatives that pack in more nutrients.

KitKat maker Nestlé is one of the companies hoping to capitalize on this trend, its CEO telling Bloomberg in October that the group was working on “companion products” packed with vitamins, minerals, and supplements.

“You want to be sure that the weight loss gets supported. You want to be sure that you limit the loss of lean muscle mass,” Mark Schneider said.

Analysts at Barclays, the bank that encouraged a shorting of junk food credits, were bullish on the prospects of French food manufacturer Danone.

Barclays says the food maker could easily double the €500 million ($539 million) in annual sales it makes from its protein yogurts and yogurt drinks if Ozempic users embrace more healthy options, Bloomberg reported.
Supply issues top of Novo's own concerns

But Novo, which recently surpassed a valuation milestone of $500 billion, has more pressing matters on its mind than how food suppliers might be affected by its revolutionary product.

The group has been overwhelmed by a demand surge that vastly outweighed projections, impacting supply and leaving Novo’s potential market short of product. Several countries have moved to limit exports of the drug so it can go to diabetic patients who have a more urgent need for GLP-1s.

Novo announced earlier this week that it had bought three sites in New Jersey for $11 billion from pharma group Catalent, in a bid to accelerate its expansion into the U.S. and address its supply shortage.

This story was originally featured on Fortune.com



Novo Nordisk’s CEO says he’s fielding calls from ‘scared’ junk food suppliers asking for advice over Ozempic surge

(went with the Yahoo link since the story on Fortune was behind a paywall)
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  #18   ^
Old Sun, Feb-11-24, 03:27
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Clear admission that they make money from human misery.

"Dear heavens, we can't let them be slim and healthy and happy! That would affect our profits."
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  #19   ^
Old Sun, Feb-11-24, 09:25
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Those who are well into the obese category (meaning they are clearly qualified for the drug) are never going to become slim on the GLP-1 type drugs anyway - the maximum they lose on those drugs is about 20% of their starting weight over the course of 72 weeks. So if someone whose ideal weight is 150 lbs weighs 250 lbs, they're still going to be 50 lbs overweight and still in the obese category at the end of those 72 weeks (16 months)

There's also the issue of continuing to lose ENOUGH weight on the drugs for the insurance to continue to pay for it. If they're not seeing enough weight loss to warrant the continued cost, then they won't pay for it any more. If the individual can't afford to pay out of pocket, they end up quitting the drug, and since they never learned how to eat a reduced amount of food on their own (or eat the kinds of food that naturally reduce hunger levels), the weight comes back on. How quickly it comes back on depends on what kind of self control (white-knuckling it through the hunger) they can manage and for how long they can manage it.


****


I don't know if this belongs in this thread or not, but I read an article a couple of days ago in The Atlantic about how the current weight loss drugs don't work for everyone.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/...ht-loss/677411/

(I can post a link, but as soon as I'd read the article, it said that was my last free article, so I can't read it again or quote it unless I'm willing to put up the money for a subscription. I've tried different browsers including a new incognito/private window and they all say the same thing.)

From what I'd heard months ago, all GLP-1 patients start out at the lowest dosage, and many people feel no effects from such a low dosage at all. Dosages are only increased once a month, and it can take a couple of months of increased dosages to reach a therapeutic dose where their appetite is affected enough to start losing weight.

According to the article though there are apparently people who the drug simply doesn't work for them at all, no matter how high the dosage.

However, they said there are a lot more weight loss drugs in development.

They didn't find this the least bit alarming, because there are drugs for many conditions that have have dozens or even hundreds of options to try, since not every drug works for every person. The one they specified as an example was blood pressure medication, and there were hundreds (or did it say thousands?) to choose from. If one doesn't work, they try another, and keep trying until they find one that works to reduce blood pressure to a normal level.

The point is that the current GLP-1 and PYY drugs are only the beginning. As they learn more about how to manipulate the body's response to foods, they'll develop more and more drugs that restrict appetite without the individual needing to actually change what they eat, or intentionally reduce how much they eat, since the drugs themselves result in them eating significantly less.
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  #20   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-24, 20:17
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Whenever you buy anything from a corporation, you have to remember this:

The corporation does not care about you. All it cares about is your money.

A corporation has to make more and more and more and more profits every quarter, or the stockholders will jump ship.

Make sure you are aware of that whenever you buy something corporate, and then evaluate if it is good for you or not. The corporation doesn't care, all it cares about is your money.
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  #21   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-24, 21:17
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Are they going to give it a catchy name, like "Ayds"? The caramel-flavoured chew was marketed as an appetite-suppressant candy, but went out of business during the Aids crisis in the mid-1980s. The active ingredient was originally benzocaine, presumably to reduce the sense of taste to reduce eating, later changed in the candy (as reported by The New York Times) to phenylpropanolamine.

Last edited by deirdra : Tue, Feb-27-24 at 21:25.
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  #22   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-24, 22:13
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
Are they going to give it a catchy name, like "Ayds"? The caramel-flavoured chew was marketed as an appetite-suppressant candy, but went out of business during the Aids crisis in the mid-1980s. The active ingredient was originally benzocaine, presumably to reduce the sense of taste to reduce eating, later changed in the candy (as reported by The New York Times) to phenylpropanolamine.


My mom used those, only hers were the chocolate flavor.

I thought the benzocaine was to numb the stomach so you didn't feel so hungry, but I would imagine it worked to numb the taste buds too.



I'm sure they'll brainstorm some catchy names like

O-Zem-wow!
Wego-chews
Zep-bits
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Feb-29-24, 04:16
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Ick! I had strep throat and used that numbing spray. But that's not candy But it did make food unappetizing. Which goes to show this has long been a civilization problem, not a hunter/gather one. People will do ANYTHING except stop eating sugar when food has become their drug.

And I think most kept this danger under control when they lived in a culture that did not bombard a person with processed opportunity every waking hour. A plain baked potato will give a person a sugar rush, if they would eat it. Starch is the same thing, chemically.

Which is how sweetened starch is determined to be our new future. And we need a drug to make us want the old one less?

If it weren't for the side effects, it would be a fool-proof plan. Just how much medicine is about saving us from what OUR FOOD is doing to us? They are creating their own market.
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  #24   ^
Old Thu, Feb-29-24, 08:50
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Ick! I had strep throat and used that numbing spray. But that's not candy But it did make food unappetizing. Which goes to show this has long been a civilization problem, not a hunter/gather one. People will do ANYTHING except stop eating sugar when food has become their drug.

And I think most kept this danger under control when they lived in a culture that did not bombard a person with processed opportunity every waking hour. A plain baked potato will give a person a sugar rush, if they would eat it. Starch is the same thing, chemically.

Which is how sweetened starch is determined to be our new future. And we need a drug to make us want the old one less?

If it weren't for the side effects, it would be a fool-proof plan. Just how much medicine is about saving us from what OUR FOOD is doing to us? They are creating their own market.


Not disagreeing - just want to make sure it's understood that these are 2 different markets.

There's the food manufacturers (Ok, UPF manufacturers) - their goal is to create and sell as much irresistible food as possible.

Then there's the drug market, and one of their current goals is to create drugs that reduce the individual's desire for irresistible food, and of course to sell as much of those appetite reducing drugs as possible.

That puts their goals in direct conflict with each other.

This is a very different scenario from the UPF market creating snacks and treats that diabetics can't resist, and drug manufacturers spiking the price on insulin because diabetics who can't resist UPF end up needing more insulin to keep their blood sugar somewhat under control.

The UPF companies are seeing the writing on the wall - If they lose sales because their best customers are suddenly their former best customers, that is a very serious problem for their industry, and as long as the weight loss drugs are selling more and more, it's likely to become even more of a problem - creating UPFs that are geared towards those whose appetites have been seriously dampened by drugs is going to be their natural goal, one they will pursue desperately.

Bob said it well:

Quote:
Whenever you buy anything from a corporation, you have to remember this: The corporation does not care about you. All it cares about is your money. A corporation has to make more and more and more and more profits every quarter, or the stockholders will jump ship.
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  #25   ^
Old Fri, Mar-01-24, 20:44
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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In millions of years of human history, there was no way to store food for the starvation season (winter in the temperate zone and the dry season in the tropics).

Those who survived the starvation season put on a lot of weight before, and lived mostly from their fat reserves until the spring or the rainy season returned. Bears and others do that before hibernating.

The people that, put on the most weight, plus liked and ate a lot of sugar when the fruit ripened right before the starvation season, survived. So they passed their sweet tooth genes on to us. Those who didn't like sugar never made it to spring or the rains.

So loving sweets and eating massive quantities of them are in our genes. We can't help it.

But after millions of years, we now have ways to store the food through the starvation season. We don't have to depend on finding enough to eat every day, just to make it until tomorrow.

So that sweet tooth and the urge to indulge it in a big way have become a liability instead of an asset.

We have to understand that, and use whatever works for each individual to keep in shape for our own health. My parents died too soon due to obesity related diseases. I don't want that for myself, I like living.

I found what works for me, a ketogenic diet. I'm 77, in the very upper range of 'normal' in my BMI, on zero prescription medications, and according to my doc have a heart/circulatory system of a healthy 50-year-old person.

I've been on this diet since it was called Atkins Induction, and that's a long time. I was on my way to the 300 pound average in my family.

Sure, I still miss fried potatoes, chocolate cake, pecan pie, donuts, and so on, but the sacrifice is worth it. I've already lived longer than my father did, and am healthier than he was when he was in his 50s.

Will keto work for everyone? I have no idea. I do know if you want to be healthy and have a potentially long life, you need to find what works for you and stick to it.

Drugs are not the answer, Every drug comes with side effects, some worse than others, some won't rear their ugly symptoms for years, when it's too late.

My childhood family doctor preached to use drugs as a last resort. I think that was good advice.

So there will be no ayds, ozempic, or whatever alphabet soup drug they invent next for me.

If you want a longer, healthier life, do what you need to do. If you would rather take a risk and enjoy life today more, that's a valid choice too. After all, you could live in perfect health and have a meteorite fall from the sky and kill you way before your time.
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  #26   ^
Old Sat, Mar-02-24, 04:38
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
Not disagreeing - just want to make sure it's understood that these are 2 different markets.

There's the food manufacturers (Ok, UPF manufacturers) - their goal is to create and sell as much irresistible food as possible.

Then there's the drug market, and one of their current goals is to create drugs that reduce the individual's desire for irresistible food, and of course to sell as much of those appetite reducing drugs as possible.

That puts their goals in direct conflict with each other.


I was thinking that making them sick with bad food was in best interest of pharma profit.

Heart disease and diabetes drugs are HUGE moneymakers, is what I was thinking. Not collusion. But causation.

Which leads me to my bigger question: Are drugs and medical all we can do? Is this another case of only having a hammer?

That's why I'm back to public health and prevention. Like a recent article said, "Just like tobacco."
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  #27   ^
Old Wed, May-22-24, 08:33
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Reviving this thread because companion candies are not enough: Nestle is upping their game:

https://www.cnn.com/2024/05/21/food...eins/index.html

Quote:

Nestlé is releasing a lineup of frozen food for people on Ozempic and other GLP-1 drugs

Nestlé, the maker of frozen food brands like Stouffer’s and DiGiorno, is slimming down with a new line of meals for people taking GLP-1 drugs, such as Ozempic, for weight loss.

The new frozen food brand called Vital Pursuit will consist of 12 portion-controlled meals, high in protein plus fiber, “intended to be a companion for GLP-1 weight loss medication users and consumers focused on weight management,” the company announced Tuesday.

It’s the first brand from Nestlé specifically for people on drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy, joining other companies in expanding to cash in and remain relevant. J.P. Morgan predicts that obesity medication will soon be a $100 billion market and sees about 9% of the US population being on a weight-loss drug by 2030.

The long-term effects of GLP-1s — or glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists — on people’s health remains unclear. However, a recent study on Wagovy significantly reduced heart risk in addition to helping with weight loss. The results showed that the average weight loss for people using the medication was sustained for up to 208 weeks, or four years.

The drugs have changed the way people eat, both in portion sizes and frequency, according to the company. Nestlé North America CEO Steve Presley said in a press release that Vital Pursuit “provides accessible, great-tasting food options that support the needs of consumers in this emerging category.”

A full lineup of Vital Pursuit options was not immediately released, but it will hit grocery stores later this year with a suggested price of $4.99 or less. The meals are made with whole grains or protein pasta and consist of sandwich melts, pizzas and bowls, enriched in nutrients like potassium, calcium and iron that the prescription drug users might miss from eating less food overall.

Adding a brand like this to Nestlé’s portfolio for consumer brands makes sense, according to Neil Saunders, retail analyst and managing director at GlobalData Retail, especially since GLP-1 drugs could be “disruptive” to food manufacturers.

Nestlé also sells Lean Cuisine, a diet-focused frozen food brand launched more than 40 years ago to attract calorie-counting customers, but it’s “seen as old-school” by customers, Saunders told CNN.

“The new brand is positioned as a much more scientific approach with an emphasis on nutrition and balance,” he said. “Nestlé is hoping to gain new customers and widen its audience.”

Companies respond

The sudden rise of GLP-1 drugs is also seen as an opportunity by other companies, like GNC, a once-bankrupt chain that sells vitamins and nutritional supplements. Last month, the retailer announced that it was adding a dedicated section in its US stores with vitamins, protein shakes and supplements tailored to people on GLP-1 medications.

Costco has started offering Ozempic at its US pharmacies through its low-cost health care partner Sesame. The program, launched in April, includes a video consultation with a weight loss doctor or specialist, a GLP-1 or weight loss prescription, if appropriate, and ongoing support through unlimited messaging and guidance with a health care provider.

WeightWatchers launched a membership plan for people that gives members access to doctors who can prescribe these medications. It also made a $100 million-plus deal to buy Sequence, a telehealth business that offers virtual prescriptions to patients for these weight loss drugs where appropriate.

Gyms are also adjusting their strategies as more of their members take medications for weight loss. Luxury gyms, such as Life Time, are acquiring weight loss clinics with doctors who can prescribe GLP-1s, while Equinox debuted a personal training program for members taking GLP-1s to preserve muscle mass.

Food companies, like Nestlé, are also bracing for GLP-1 consumers to buy fewer sugary snacks and drinks. J.P. Morgan last year said that current GLP-1 users purchased around 8% less food — including snacks, soft drinks and high-carb products — over the prior year, compared with consumers who were not on these drugs.

Vital Pursuit “sends a signal to investors and stakeholders that Nestlé is looking at weight-loss drugs and is responding to the opportunity,” Saunders said.


At least these meals are considered to be "high protein" - but in the twisted world of RDA's, that probably means less than 20 g of protein per meal.
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, May-23-24, 02:46
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Makes sense to launch with the same frozen food product category as their Lean Cuisine, Hot Pockets, Diguorno, etc. I could not find how much more protein, but assume some minor juggling of ingredients in an already "portion-aligned" meal. [and less food to align with the lower price? A win-win for Nestle]

Enriching a hot pocket with synthetic potassium, calcium and iron and adding some processed seed oil for "good fats" is NOT the same as eating those micronutrients in whole foods. They will continue to benefit from designing a Vital meal to hit Nutrient Bliss points.

Nestle Press Release: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rel...-302150851.html

Last edited by JEY100 : Thu, May-23-24 at 04:14.
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  #29   ^
Old Thu, May-23-24, 04:26
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Kristine Kristine is offline
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I hate re-branding. "Lean Cuisine" isn't getting enough clicks and sales anymore? "Let's tweak it a bit, rename it and re-launch it."

"Vital Pursuit" has to be the weirdest, most awkward food product brand name I've ever heard. If you asked me to guess what product "Vital Pursuit" brand is, I'd guess maybe hunting equipment, military/police something-or-other... you might have wanted to focus-group this one, guys.

So, nice press release, but they're basically admitting their meals sucked. If they're only now trying to prioritize protein, fiber and nutrients, that means they weren't before. Thanks, jerks. 😒
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  #30   ^
Old Thu, May-23-24, 04:49
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Nestlé is releasing a lineup of frozen food for people on Ozempic and other GLP-1 drugs


Because of course they are. We have a seamless pipeline of:
  • DISCOVERY of something that does something in a petri dish and can be easily supplemented or made from a catchy base ingredient.
  • MARKETING follows seamlessly, because it's been geared up for near-simultaneous promitions while interest is high. People will go back and find the months or less science announcement. Harkening back -- if anyone tries to trace it -- back to the original paper, which no one tries to read but impresses them anyway.
  • PRODUCT: ready to burst from the gates, often through barely legal pyramid schemes.
  • DISINFORMATION: It takes some expertise to wade through what looks like overwhelming consensus from all kinds of authorities.
  • THE BUILD: all towards accepting the corporate/processed way of life, becoming more "plant-based" and buying overpriced sources of cheap protein and even cheaper fats.

The markets have been manipulated because of the way we managed health insurance, health care, the whole structure. It was incentivized to make money so no one should be surprised this is where we are.

It's where we've been forced to go. Past time we fought back. We just won't have the food addicts on our side, because that's another uphill battle.

BUT, everyone is tired of losing people and being just plain tired. And our knowledge of what is going on doesn't sound quite so Bond Villain anymore, does it?

It does something when I tell them I started low carb twenty years ago and it's been doing me nothing but good. They know it's the truth, now.
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