Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Daily Low-Carb Support > General Low-Carb
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sat, Oct-07-23, 07:29
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default Forever Strong

A new book, Forever Strong, A new science-based strategy for aging well, by Dr. Gabrielle Lyon will be released on October 17th. In advance of release, she has been on a number of podcasts, and in addition to her own podcast channel. She is a practicing physician with a specialty in Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, with protein research in Dr Don Layman's lab. Her practice focuses on Muscle-Centric Medicine.

This morning I listened to her on Cynthia Thurlow's podcast. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podca...i=1000630512707
The interview includes the importance of protein for women's health and the impact of intermittent fasting on muscle health. [not good, about min. 46]

There are free resources are available on her website. https://drgabriellelyon.com/# an archive of her podcasts with Dr Layman, Dr. Naiman, Dr Eenfeldt and others in the higher protein, lower carb space.

Last edited by JEY100 : Sat, Oct-07-23 at 07:36.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Sat, Oct-07-23, 09:10
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 5,348
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/125/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Vermont
Default

Thank you for this. I plan to explore further.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Sat, Oct-07-23, 12:35
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 19,283
 
Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
Stats: 225/224/163 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 2%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Interesting!!!

Funny how I'm of an age now to be interested in geriatrics. More funny since some years ago a primary dumped me and all her patients to take on the old folks.

Forgot to include...

Was able to convince my mother to increase her meat intake a couple years ago. She is now late 80's.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Sun, Oct-08-23 at 06:07.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Sun, Oct-08-23, 03:43
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

She did geriatrics because there was a fellowship available for that sub specialty. Dr Lyon also works with the Special Operations Military and specializes in fitness and performance. A broad background in muscle centric health.

Doctors view the older adult population as divided into three life-stage subgroups: the young-old (approximately 65 to 74 years old), the middle-old (ages 75 to 84 years old), and the old-old (over age 85). Even the "young old" get questions on fall risk, cognitive ability, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Sun, Oct-08-23, 04:13
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 5,348
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/125/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Vermont
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100

Doctors view the older adult population as divided into three life-stage subgroups: the young-old (approximately 65 to 74 years old), the middle-old (ages 75 to 84 years old), and the old-old (over age 85). Even the "young old" get questions on fall risk, cognitive ability, etc.


Four years ago at the “young” age of 70, in mile 3 of my daily walk with my dog, I caught my toe as I walked briskly down a moderate slope. I fell and broke my wrist. I was able to get back up, retrieve my dog who had not run off and then walk the additional 1/2 mile home. I called my son who then drove me to the ER. Doogie Howser at the ER treated me as if my age was the only important variable. Among other things, as I was getting ready to leave he asked me if I wanted a sling or did I think I was going to fall again, as if my age was the important variable not my apparent healthy physical condition or the fact that my fall was the result of the kind of accident that could easily happen to anyone of any age. In fact he had not bothered to ask me how the fall occurred. I guess he just assumed it was probably age related. Humph!
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Sun, Oct-08-23, 06:02
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 26,862
 
Plan: Muscle Centric
Stats: 238/153/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: UK
Default

Janet, many thanks for sharing this.

I have the book on order ahead of it's release on the 17th.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Sat, Oct-14-23, 00:47
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 26,862
 
Plan: Muscle Centric
Stats: 238/153/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: UK
Default

An article in the Times this morning ahead of publication:

Quote:
How to stay healthy over 40: the doctor who prescribes weights and protein

Dr Gabrielle Lyon says that building muscle is the key to optimum health. She tells Peta Bee why. Plus: read an excerpt from her new book


Put away the diet books, throw away the scales. Staying slim and living a longer and healthier life does not come down to your body fat percentage. Rather, it is about how much lean muscle you have, according to a leading doctor in osteopathic medicine and family medicine practitioner in the US.

Dr Gabrielle Lyon has spent years researching longevity and the impact of lifestyle changes in the health of her own patients as they age. Now, in a new book, Forever Strong, she argues that what people should be focusing on for optimal health is not trying to lose weight but getting stronger.

“We are indoctrinated into a body fat-phobic way of thinking about our wellness,” Lyon says. “We focus constantly on what weight we have to lose, when we should switch to thinking about what we are set to gain if we become capable of building stronger muscles through eating more protein and resistance training.” Rebooting one’s health with an emphasis on building muscle, she says, will help people of all ages to boost their metabolism, have far more energy, stay mentally sharper and shift excess body fat.

As well as practising as a doctor both in New York and Texas, Lyon hosts her own Apple podcast with 2.5 million listens, has a YouTube channel with 2.75 million views, and has given aTED talk on what she terms “muscle-centric medicine”. In her forties and with two children under five, she bursts with energy, her hair and complexion shining with good health. Her toned physique is an advertisement for her approach, but also a hangover from her days as a fitness and strength competitor in her youth.

It was while spending two years at Washington University on a research and medical fellowship in geriatrics and nutritional sciences that she first became intrigued by the rising numbers of people struggling to lose weight and patients in their sixties and seventies being diagnosed with dementia, despite them following the latest science-backed advice on food intake and activity. Over time she concluded that the connection between these groups and others with ill health was not only that they were ageing or had too much body fat, but that their muscle size and muscle health had plummeted to levels far lower than those of younger people.

What was missing from their lifestyles, she says, was resistance exercise and enough protein in their diet — the combination needed to enhance muscle health. “Protein is critical for health,” Lyon says. “It plays a vital role not just in building new muscle, but in controlling the functions of other tissues and organs important for metabolic function and quality of life.” Also often overlooked, she stresses, is the importance of protein for “the production of neurotransmitters that keep our brains healthy and have a direct association with sleep and mood”.

Earlier this year the adventurer Bear Grylls, 49, told The Times how he transformed the health of his whole family by eating more protein: specifically an “ancestral diet”, in which read meat features heavily. “For millions of years we’ve thrived and been strongest and healthiest by eating meat, blood and organs,” he said.

Lyons says that by consuming more high-quality protein in the diet, from animal and some plant sources, and adding resistance training — starting with something as simple as bodyweight exercises and bands three times a week before progressing to weights — people will experience benefits even within days.

“A lot of people start to feel changes in muscle strength and function as well as neurological adaptations such as spatial awareness when they move even before they notice visible improvements to their body,” Lyon says. “There will be almost immediate improvements in blood glucose control, and within two weeks markers for a range of diseases will reduce.”

Emerging studies have proven that strong muscles are far better at helping the body respond to insulin, resulting in better blood sugar control after meals and a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, which affects the health of the heart. In a large trial involving nearly half a million adults published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine last year, a team of US scientists showed that adding more muscle-strengthening workouts not only enhanced fitness but reduced the risk of injuries and improved longevity.

Lyon says the importance of muscle for midlifers has been suggested in research, including a study from the University of Copenhagen that shows repeated contractions of skeletal muscle boosts the production of myokines, hormones that have been shown to influence the way in which the entire body responds to exercise. “We now know that these myokine hormones are extraordinarily valuable in leveraging the health of the overall body,” Lyon says. “For example, German researchers showed that the myokine boost with resistance training helps to regulate the processes that lead to improved cardiovascular and metabolic health.”

Lyon describes one recent female patient who had struggled with her health and weight for decades, but shed 4st within nine months of shifting her focus from calorie counting to consuming more dietary protein and lifting weights. “We worked on her protein consumption and her workouts to enhance her muscle health,” Lyon says. “Not only did she lose a lot of weight, but her joint pain disappeared, her biomarkers for autoimmune disease were dramatically reduced, and her levels of blood fats improved.”

It doesn’t end there. From our fifties onwards, she says, good muscle health also helps to maintain bone density and prevent osteoporosis. In our seventies it protects against falls. Best of all, perhaps, it has a powerful anti-ageing effect on the way muscle tissue works above and beyond aesthetics.

The TV presenter Davina McCall, 55, has said that this is the reason why strength training is an important part of her routine. “Stronger bones and muscles will stop me falling and help me stay well for longer,” she said. “Strength training keeps my mind young too.”

McCall has said she has protein shakes to “ensure I can maintain muscle tone”. She has recently created a shake with Foodspring, a sports nutrition company, called Protein + Relax, which she says she has as an after-dinner treat.

“By eating dietary protein and doing resistance exercise in middle and old age you enable your body’s muscle tissue to act more like youthful muscle tissue of your twenties,” Lyon says. “It can have life-changing effects on homeostatic mechanisms that influence the brain, ageing, memory and longevity.”

Dr Gabrielle Lyon’s 8 rules to reboot your health

1. You are probably not eating enough protein


Current UK and USA government guidelines suggest that you need about 0.8g-1g of protein daily per kilogram of bodyweight, which equates to 50-63g, or 2-3 palm-sized portions, for an adult weighing 63kg (about 10st). But these are baseline recommendations set to prevent deficiency and maintain health. I’d argue strongly it is not enough. As we age our ability to digest and utilise protein decreases, meaning we need proportionately more of it in our diets to get the same results. Research from McMaster University in Ontario has shown that intakes of up to 1.6g per kg for an active person are needed to support muscle health from middle age onwards. The minimum I’d ever recommend is 100g of protein daily for men and women who are also doing some resistance training. To give you an idea of what this means, a skinless chicken breast contains 54g, a 145g can of tuna 40g, two eggs 14g, a 250g steak 62g, and beans, peas and lentils anything from 5-8g per 100g.

2. It’s not just how much, but the quality of protein that matters

Protein in food is the delivery system for the 20 amino acids that are needed to support the body’s physical structure. Of these, nine ar

e considered essential amino acids because the body cannot produce them itself and they must be obtained from food. Animal-derived protein is, by definition, better quality than plant-based protein in that it contains the highest quantities of these essential amino acids. That doesn’t mean you won’t get enough if you eat a vegetarian, vegan or plant-based diet, just that it requires more effort and planning, and you’d have to consume more protein in total to get what you need. You will almost certainly have to supplement with some extra protein sources, such as a vegan protein powder, if you don’t eat at least dairy and eggs.

3. Prioritise protein for breakfast

We come out of an overnight fast after sleeping in a catabolic state, meaning our body is preparing to break down nutrients for energy because our reserves are low. Our skeletal muscle is primed for stimulation first thing in the morning, and by frontloading with 30-50g of good-quality dietary protein in your first meal of the day, you will set off this important process. You begin to impact your body’s intricate machinery, priming it to boost muscle growth and repair, supporting other important processes. Because it fills you up, having protein for breakfast also offsets hunger later on and helps you to make better food choices all day. For breakfast I have 2 eggs, sometimes as a frittata, and some Greek yoghurt, which has 10g of protein per 100g serving. And you can add some nuts. There is 6g of protein in a handful of almonds. Sometimes I even have minced beef, which has up to 30g per 100g serving.

4. Midlifers need protein after a workout

Following a resistance workout with a protein shake or snack actually matters less for people in their twenties and thirties than it does for those aged 50-plus. Our ability to use amino acids is reduced from midlife onwards, but taking a 20g dose of protein — the amount of a couple of handfuls of nuts or a shake with 20g of whey protein, for example — when blood flow is increased after the intense muscle contractions of weight training enhances the uptake. Make it a habit if you are older or are starting with very low muscle mass.

5. Lifting weights three times a week is a non-negotiable after 40

Increasing your intake of protein will bring benefits to your health, but these are multiplied several fold when you add resistance training, which means performing high-tension muscle contractions against any external load. When you use resistance bands or lift weights you immediately help your body’s skeletal muscle to remove carbs from the bloodstream, protecting against conditions such as type 2 diabetes in the longer term. Weights help to ramp up muscle-protein synthesis and build new muscle tissue by using your body’s amino acid reserves for each muscle contraction. Start resistance training as early in life as you can — I get my kids, aged two and four, doing bodyweight exercises — but by your forties and fifties doing it at least three times a week is essential to maximise the breakdown and repair process that keeps muscles strong. It is also a powerful switch for changing body composition, and you will quickly feel and look leaner and stronger.

6. Gradually add more deadlifts and squats (and wear a weighted vest around the house)

Progression with strength and resistance training is critical. We have to keep getting better with it or we simply won’t shift that metabolic needle. Don’t ignore aerobic exercise, such as walking and running, which is very important for cardiovascular health, but focus on adding a few more repetitions of squats and deadlifts or lifting a slightly heavier weight every few weeks. You can add resistance work to your daily life in any number of ways — even by doing 30-60 seconds of squats as you stand at your desk. I like to wear a 5kg weighted vest around the house all day.

7. Eat a protein-rich meal four hours before bed

There’s a school of thought — and some research to back it up — that eating 30-40g of quality protein, such as that in a bowl of Greek yoghurt, before bed can help with overnight muscle protein synthesis as well as increasing metabolic rate. I tend to recommend eating a meal containing 30-50g protein — for example a chicken breast — 3-4 hours before you go to bed. Eating anything too late can interfere with sleep and the circadian rhythm, and having protein that bit earlier doesn’t make it any less effective at repairing and building muscles overnight.

8. Consider taking supplements

The foundation of healthy muscle is a healthy, protein-rich diet and resistance exercise. However, there are some supplements that can support your quest for better muscle health, and my favourite is Urolithin A, a natural gut microbiome-derived food metabolite that has been shown in published studies to affect the turnover of muscle mitochondria and boost muscle health. Last year a study in the journal Cell Reports Medicine showed that a supplement of Urolithin A improved muscle performance in middle-aged adults over four months, while another in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that it boosted muscle endurance in older adults. I use Mitopure (60 softgels for £102; mitopure.com). If you do eat a diet without much red meat, I would recommend a supplement of creatine, especially from the age of 55 onwards, as it has a phenomenal effect on maintaining muscle mass in conjunction with weight training. Since there are vitamin D receptors in our muscles, everyone should take a supplement of this important vitamin, and there is emerging research that omega 3 fatty acids and fish oil supplements impact the muscle health of women more than men.

How to get the most out of your resistance training

by Dr Gabrielle Lyon

1. Select exercises you know how to properly execute. Correct form is the foremost priority with any exercise.

2. Create a balance between muscle groups and movement patterns. Train each specific muscle group three to five times a week with 48 to 72 hours of recovery time in between.

3. Think of ways you can make your exercise selection more challenging once you’re ready to progress. Adding more load (weight)? Increasing time under tension?

4. Your performance will reflect the quality of your sleep and nutrition. Keep recovery as a high priority or your training will suffer.

5. For a higher payoff, do conditioning and interval sessions as a separate morning session, then complete a resistance training session approximately six to eight hours later. Research suggests that back-to-back strength and endurance sessions are less effective because of insufficient recovery time to achieve maximal benefit.

6. This type of scheduling is an ideal, not a requirement. Most important is that you get the sessions done.

How to plan a resistance programme

Remember that your body is three-dimensional. This may sound obvious, but too often I see people working out who seem to have forgotten that their bodies can move in ways other than forward and backward (referred to as the sagittal plane of movement). Our bodies also have the capacity to move laterally (side to side) and to rotate. A well-rounded programme requires balance between muscle groups and incorporates all our movement patterns. Your workout also needs to balance pulling motions (eg, a row, bicep curl, lat pull-down) with pushing motions (eg, push-up, chest press, overhead press). Leg exercises occupy their own category, beyond push or pull, because most incorporate both the anterior (front) and posterior (back) muscles synergistically, unless specific muscles are isolated on a machine.

Balancing your workouts among the push, pull and leg categories will also help to reduce feeling overwhelmed by deciding which combinations of exercise to choose. Next, it’s time to tie in planes of motion. For example, a chest press is like an overhead press in terms of mechanics, but the movement takes place in a different plane of motion. The muscle groups targeted in each of those exercises are different due to the positioning of the weights in space.

Perform the most important exercises first, when you have the most energy, mental focus and time. Prioritising which movements you execute at your peak will bring you that much closer to achieving your goal. If your workout ends up getting cut short, at least you will have consistently executed your workout’s primary objective.

Exercise starts in the brain

You can use physical training not only to enhance your strength but also to sharpen your attention skills. Several studies show that muscle improvement increases when we visualise the target muscle and consciously direct activity and concentration there during exercise performance. For example, in a bicep curl, focus your attention on the squeeze in the bicep at the top of every rep. Every exercise requires a mind-muscle connection.

Your intention is key. Directed attention correlates with increased activation, possibly reducing contribution from other muscles. Before you begin your workout, silence your phone and get your mind in the zone. Ignoring the ping of texts and alerts will help you to focus on the muscle you’re targeting in each exercise. Over the long term, this approach can improve your training, both mentally and physically.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...ining-0qcbk9ptm
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Sat, Oct-14-23, 03:16
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

Demi, Thank you for posting this long book summary!

I'm all in with all those protein recommendations now, but good grief! I'm not even close on her resistance and strength exercises wear a weighted vest all day? Strength and conditioning in the morning, with resistance session 6 hours later? And more….so.much.more.
I hope she has some beginner, out of shape senior program that cuts this down to the essentials.

Like her mentor Dr Don Layman, that 100g of protein rec. is an minimum for everyone, esp. older women. 1 g. protein per pound of ideal body weight works even better for weight loss (Marty Kendall suggests working up to that) and 30-50 g for the first meal is key to being satiated all day. Eating enough protein is only possible for me in at least an 8 hour "window", cannot eat more than about 80 G protein at one meal. Bacon, sausage, cheese, HWC, cream cheese, and pork rinds are higher in fat than protein. Alternative low fat protein sources: https://optimisingnutrition.com/protein-rich-foods/

Last edited by JEY100 : Sat, Oct-14-23 at 07:14.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Sat, Oct-14-23, 06:06
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 5,348
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/125/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: Vermont
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Demi, Thank you for posting this long book summary!

I'm all in with all those protein recommendations now, but good grief! I'm not even close on her resistance and strength exercises wear a weighted vest all day? Strength and conditioning in the morning, with resistance session 6 hours later? And more….so.much.more.
I hope she has some beginner, out of shape senior program that cuts this down to the essentials.



This is often the problem, recommendations that are too extreme for us “seniors” or us relative beginners. And I wonder, is that much focus on exercise really necessary? I am not asking if exercise is necessary but rather do we really have to be planning our whole day around it? And then there is her recommendation to take Mitopure which, at best, if you subscribe to automatic shipments every 2 months, cost $100 a month.

It makes me wonder what her target demographic is, not just by age but in terms of finances. I don’t disagree with her basic premise, protein and strength training but I wish it were more focused on the common woman. I pre-ordered her book and I am sure I can gain something from it but I am beginning to suspect that I will find it not directed towards me. I am probably not her demographic. Maybe I’ll be pleasantly surprised,
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Sat, Oct-14-23, 06:08
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,794
 
Plan: Carnivore
Stats: 212/179/160 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Rural Maine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Was able to convince my mother to increase her meat intake a couple years ago. She is now late 80's.


When my mother-in-law was told by her doc to up her protein, he said to have peanut butter on crackers as an afternoon snack.

Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Sat, Oct-14-23, 17:23
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Doing My Best
Posts: 4,924
 
Plan: LC/CancerRecovery
Stats: 170/135/130 Female 62 inches
BF:24%
Progress: 88%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
Default

My situation puts me in a nutritional bind. I'm just off years of cancer treatment and absolutely at a loss about my nutritional health. While I was having chemo, I had a blood draw every 3 weeks. Now I have no way to track what food is doing for my body. I've always made lots of red blood cells, but my last test showed too much calcium in my blood. If I were to go to a nutritionist, she would advise me to eat lots of carbs because that's what they're conditioned to do. My energy levels vary, too.
Really don't want to risk too much of ANYTHING.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Sun, Oct-15-23, 03:33
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

Glenda, Have you considered Optimising Nutrition for Micronutrients? It requires close tracking of food intake using a database with about 80 nutrients. I find that class requires the most detail work but Jean started with this class info. The food lists and recipes make it easier now to find the optimal foods for you. There are about 30 dietary patterns offered, inc. Therapeutic Ketogenic.
https://optimisingnutrition.com/are...ant/#more-26526

Easier, consider eating " The Most Nutrient Dense, Health Promoting Foods Focus only on these lists, esp.Dairy, and drop any supplements.

All nutrient dense foods: https://optimisingnutrition.com/nutrient-dense-foods-2/

Calcium: https://optimisingnutrition.com/cal...ds-and-recipes/

Last edited by JEY100 : Sun, Oct-15-23 at 04:35.
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Sun, Oct-15-23, 07:08
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 14,760
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/130/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 129%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
This is often the problem, recommendations that are too extreme for us “seniors” or us relative beginners. And I wonder, is that much focus on exercise really necessary? I am not asking if exercise is necessary but rather do we really have to be planning our whole day around it? And then there is her recommendation to take Mitopure which, at best, if you subscribe to automatic shipments every 2 months, cost $100 a month.

It makes me wonder what her target demographic is, not just by age but in terms of finances.


Having giant datapools of people to target has created micro-customer bases. So it's entirely possible she's aiming at people with lots of disposable income. They are used to taking dramatic steps; in fact, they prefer it.

Or perhaps it's the media who are pressing the flashy parts, from a press release who wants them to. I hope the book covers all levels of ability, and that means financial, too. I appreciate my favorite authors who offer an array of alternatives.

We are people who are just barely able to keep it together, as DH and I heal from having stress related illnesses during a time of great stress I usually go up and down three flights of stairs at least once a day, and my writing studio doesn't have a desk, but a mattress on the floor.

I get more energy from my writing sessions because I'm not holding myself upright at a desk for long periods. Getting down to, and up from, almost-the-floor is one of my daily strategies to build movement into my day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
I don’t disagree with her basic premise, protein and strength training but I wish it were more focused on the common woman.


I thought I lost weight to help my joints. Now I have to buy removable fat? That sounds... weird.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Tue, Oct-17-23, 05:12
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

The book was published today, and the Optimal Protein podcast with Vanessa Spina interviews Dr Gabrielle Lyon about Muscle Centric Medicine.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podca...i=1000631519674


Excellent discussion in first half about why OMAD does NOT support muscle protein synthesis and weight loss.

Her Longevity Plan is Two meals a day…at least 50 grams Protein at First and last meal. (Or more) In between you may need to add a snack or light meal of protein. FF yogurt, cottage cheese plus protein powder or a shake works well for me to get my total protein up to 145 g (1 g P per pound of ideal weight) for few calories.

Like Don Layman, this is a minimum of 100g of protein for everyone, especially seniors, spread over the day. Eating all your protein at dinner has negatives she explains. The biggest advantage to me Eating at least 50g at the first meal is satiety….throughout the day to the snack or last meal, no evening snacks, etc.

Second half includes carb threshold per meal, essential fats ( very little) and a lesson about mindset from a Navy Seal.

Dr Lyons' own podcast today is also about the book.

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Oct-17-23 at 06:29.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Sun, Oct-22-23, 06:49
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

Dr Lyon on Good Morning America with Forever Strong exercises.

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/...h-age-104193181
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:01.


Copyright © 2000-2024 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.