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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Nov-24-21, 06:07
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,794
 
Plan: Carnivore
Stats: 212/179/160 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Rural Maine
Default How Long for Protein to Be Digested in Stomach?

This morning I read this on one of the FB carnivore pages:

Quote:
If you are eating only meat, your stomach acids will dissolve it into a liquid state in under an hour and pass it into your intestinal tract.


Think that's true? I've always wondered how long it takes for the protein I eat to get past the stomach. Sometimes I still get reflux, but really not very often anymore. When I get it, though, it's like 2 hours after I've eaten my meal of meat (or sometimes in the mornings after not eating for more than 12 hours). Usually I just put up with it, but then I start coughing and want to take a Pepcid to relieve the acid splashing up, but hesitate because I think I might be stopping the digestion of protein.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Nov-24-21, 11:29
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 25,878
 
Plan: DDF
Stats: 202/185.4/179 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

I question everything I read on Facebook and I applaud your skepticism.

I do get some acid issues when I eat dairy products. I try not to have any before bed time. Also, if you rely on Pepcid, you might have issues if you're trying to go cold turkey.

https://www.goodrx.com/classes/prot...ach-medications
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Nov-24-21, 11:52
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,065
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Agree with Nancy. After recently reading The Clot Thickens by Malcolm Kendrick, I understand that proton pump inhibitors can cause lasting damage, especially in the endothelium of arteries where plaque forms. Although Pepcid is not a PPI, I'm very suspicious about taking any pill for acid reflux. I eat a lot of protein, and occasionally get reflux. When I stopped drinking coffee (that may be just me), my reflux diminished and became very manageable. In the infrequent times I get it, half teaspoon of baking soda mixed in water does the trick.

Bawdy, you're very knowledgeable about this, but the old saw applies that an elimination approach may uncover what's causing this. I think, like Nancy, some dairy causes it for me, but I haven't gone that far to experiment. Good luck.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Nov-24-21, 19:14
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,794
 
Plan: Carnivore
Stats: 212/179/160 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Rural Maine
Default

Thanks, guys. I take Pepcid only rarely, and know the problems with PPIs. I was diagnosed with a hietal hernia and the doc prescribed PPIs. I refused flat out. Doesn't make sense to stop all acid when you're actually trying to digest foods. I only take it hours and hours after eating. For some reason I get reflux sometimes on an EMPTY stomach, so I figure it's not as detrimental. But again, not very often, and less and less as time goes by.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Nov-25-21, 02:34
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Posts: 14,760
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/130/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 129%
Location: USA
Default

I had to retrain my stomach to digest food using Betaine HCL. Here's an excellent article explaining it.

https://neurohacker.com/formulation/betaine

Now, DH is coming off years of PPI by using this system to rebuild his own acid management.

Here's a paper that says it works... as PART of PPI drug therapy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7238915/

Which is, in a nutshell, our current pharmaceutical craze which substitutes for health.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Nov-25-21, 07:27
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 19,283
 
Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
Stats: 225/224/163 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 2%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

As we age , the stomach acid becomes weaker for some people.....cant remember where that info came from.

I take ACV at many meals to increase the acid content of the stomach; and a healthy dose of salt each day: Apparently the Chloride becomes part of the HCl the stomach uses for digesting meats, etc.



As for one hour....I've read a number of times over the years while trying to time meds on an empty stomachs. Pharmacists say two hours after eating, to take on empty stomach.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Nov-25-21, 08:21
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,794
 
Plan: Carnivore
Stats: 212/179/160 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Rural Maine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I had to retrain my stomach to digest food using Betaine HCL.


Yes, I take 2 capsules of Betaine HCL with Pepsin, along with 2 Super Digestive Enzymes, with every meal and it does help. It's going to take a while for it to fully heal, but it's definitely helping. Thanks for posting that article. I'll definitely read it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
As we age , the stomach acid becomes weaker for some people.....cant remember where that info came from.

...

As for one hour....I've read a number of times over the years while trying to time meds on an empty stomachs. Pharmacists say two hours after eating, to take on empty stomach.


I've read that, too, that as we age the stomach acid gets weaker for some people. From an evolutionary point of view, it seems odd, but it's probably a result of the SAD diet rather than an evolutionary change.

Also, good to know about the 2 hours after eating. Thanks for mentioning that!

One more quote. I also found this online, which I believe is a load of crap (no pun intended, or maybe it is!):

Quote:
Red meat is a good source of proteins and fats, which makes it hard to digest. Proteins contained in meat and fish can take up to 3 days (72 hours) to fully digest. The case is different for fruits and vegetables, which are rich in fiber. Fiber-rich foods naturally complete the digestive process within a day.


So, it takes up to 3 days to digest protein, and yet only 24 hours to digest fruits and veggies with fiber (which is by definition non-digestible).

Yeah, right.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Nov-25-21, 09:41
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 19,283
 
Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
Stats: 225/224/163 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 2%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

ROFL.

Vegetable matter can be hard to digest...... My sheep chew cud as do cattle. The matter comes back into mouth for chewing to breakdown the cellulose and fiber. If the stomach acid could cope with that these animals would not have a 4 part stomach system. The long fibers cannot get thru the seive section to get to the true stomach, the part that matches our stomach.

We are not designed to digest cellulose and lignan, it passes thru without much change. So no meaningful digestion at all. No nutrients we can absorb. Any digestion would be from the microbes, which we can then absorb.

We are not rabbits with a big cecum, nor a ruminant. We need cooked veg to aid in digestion as raw is not as digestible as we don't tend to chew and chew and chew and chew.

No, I don't see how vegetables are easier to digest than meats.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Nov-26-21, 04:05
JustAGirl JustAGirl is offline
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Posts: 743
 
Plan: Paleo
Stats: 110/107/105 Female 63
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Location: usa
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I had to retrain my stomach to digest food using Betaine HCL. Here's an excellent article explaining it.

https://neurohacker.com/formulation/betaine

Now, DH is coming off years of PPI by using this system to rebuild his own acid management.

Here's a paper that says it works... as PART of PPI drug therapy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7238915/

Which is, in a nutshell, our current pharmaceutical craze which substitutes for health.

100 Truth!
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Nov-27-21, 01:52
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 25,762
 
Plan: Primal/P:E
Stats: 171/145/145 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BawdyWench
One more quote. I also found this online, which I believe is a load of crap (no pun intended, or maybe it is!):
Quote:
Red meat is a good source of proteins and fats, which makes it hard to digest. Proteins contained in meat and fish can take up to 3 days (72 hours) to fully digest. The case is different for fruits and vegetables, which are rich in fiber. Fiber-rich foods naturally complete the digestive process within a day.

So, it takes up to 3 days to digest protein, and yet only 24 hours to digest fruits and veggies with fiber (which is by definition non-digestible).

Yeah, right.
This sounds like it's right out of "Fit For Life", that nonsense veganism-touting diet book. The one that claims meat just "rots" in your digestive tract. I read that as a teenager and it only took a tenth-grader's understanding of science to know most of the book was (plant-based) baloney.
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Dec-25-23, 04:53
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

A new study in Cell has the protein people excited, it answers this question.

Marty Kendall writes:

"Can you eat 'too much protein'?
Is all that extra protein 'wasted'?
A new study shows that high protein intakes are still used, just over a longer timeframe.

Bottom line: It's impossible to overdo protein (it's a nutrient), especially if you're also not overdoing energy."

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports-m...gaYmZU5emcvja5g


Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, Dec-25-23 at 04:58.
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Dec-25-23, 12:21
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,065
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Thanks for linking this critically important study, Janet. The article dated 19 December 2023 describes an elegantly designed study that confirms the human metabolic responses to varying amounts of protein and the corresponding influence on muscle/ tissue generation and the lack of amino acid oxidation for larger amounts of protein.

Quote:
Here, we confirm our hypothesis of a dose-dependent increase in the magnitude and duration of protein-derived amino acid availability and muscle and whole-body protein synthesis rates, with a negligible impact on amino acid oxidation. This work highlights that tissues have a much higher capacity to incorporate exogenous-protein-derived amino acids than previously assumed and that the duration of the postprandial period is proportional to the size of the ingested meal.


It confirms that there is no need to be too particular about over consuming protein at meals, frees people to consume the amount of protein they require without worrying about wasting it, and supports those who need to increase their protein due to age and in response to the desire to preserve or increase muscle mass. The combination of regular resistance training using body weight or weights is a perfect stimulus for developing muscle when also consuming the amount of protein required. In addition, the thinking that certain proteins can be unhealthy to the gut is once again put to rest. We continue to understand more about those foods that truly constitute a healthy diet and lifestyle. Protein leveraging anyone?

Last edited by GRB5111 : Mon, Dec-25-23 at 12:28.
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Dec-25-23, 23:14
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 19,283
 
Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
Stats: 225/224/163 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 2%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Wow..

This flies in the face of only the first 30 g of protein is useful making any thing more a waste. If im understanding this correctly....

I've been wondering for a while how a dog or coyote can get enough nutrients when they eat one big meal day.
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Dec-26-23, 04:02
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
Posts: 13,500
 
Plan: P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/150/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/28%/25%
Progress: 134%
Location: NC
Default

The author states:
"Our new work:
No upper limit to the anabolic response to protein ingestion?

Challenges current views on:
1⃣Dose-response relationship
2⃣"Excessive" protein getting oxidized
3⃣Protein distribution
4⃣MUCH more!"

Bodybuilders have been eating "excessive protein" for decades and showing this paper's conclusions at every event But if your goal is weight loss, Marty's caveat applies, avoid overeating excessive energy with it.

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Dec-26-23 at 07:18.
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Dec-26-23, 09:29
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,760
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/130/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 129%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Wow..

This flies in the face of only the first 30 g of protein is useful making any thing more a waste. If im understanding this correctly....

I've been wondering for a while how a dog or coyote can get enough nutrients when they eat one big meal day.


Exactly. I never took that very seriously. I was alerted to "protein downplaying" when I tried vegetarianism, before it went extreme and vegan.

Everything we learn about biology and our bodies indicates protein is the biggest macronutrient of them all. This also supports protein = satiety because the body would be the fussiest about that, first.
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