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  #91   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 04:32
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
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Dr Mark Cuccuzella has a long article in the West Virginia Medicine blog, for a physician audience. Links to dozens of studies, which since this original post, lists all the ways Covid does discriminate by body weight.
Is It Time To Quarantine Junk Food?
https://wvumedicine.org/diabetes-ob...lu7bsX7QpD5OUbE
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  #92   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 08:27
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Posts: 11,591
 
Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
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Elevated blood sugar increases COVID-19 risk even without a diabetes diagnosis

Quote:
A new study, accepted for publication by The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, found that patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who had either diabetes (defined as an HbA1c above 6.5%) or uncontrolled high blood sugar (above 180mg/dL) had a mortality rate of 29% compared to a mortality rate of just 6% for patients without either of those conditions.

This is not a surprise, given that all the data we have seen thus far consistently shows diabetes as one of the greatest risk factors for severe complications from COVID-19.

However, this recent study also showed that 42% of people who did not have a diagnosis of diabetes on admission but developed uncontrolled hyperglycemia during their hospitalization died. That’s an astonishing death rate considering they could be considered to have “no pre-existing illness.”. Continues.....


https://www.dietdoctor.com/elevated...betes-diagnosis
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  #93   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 08:46
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,493
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Dr Mark Cuccuzella has a long article in the West Virginia Medicine blog, for a physician audience. Links to dozens of studies, which since this original post, lists all the ways Covid does discriminate by body weight.
Is It Time To Quarantine Junk Food?
https://wvumedicine.org/diabetes-ob...lu7bsX7QpD5OUbE

From Cucuzzella's article:

Quote:
"Critical care doctors from the world over are observing and researching the connections. Through the lens of an internist in New York:

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/coronavir...S9yOJFnC2patg6_

Every critical care specialist attending COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit where I have been filling in as an intensive care physician for the past two weeks makes the same observation: Our patients seem almost universally obese, while most ill but stable patients elsewhere in the hospital have lower body masses. Critical care doctors in other parts of the country, as well as my colleagues in Europe, report seeing the same thing. The article details what we have learned historically from other viral pandemics as well as the effects of diabetes and obesity on individual immune systems. From the article: All of this suggests that health care needs to be augmented not just with more screening and treatments but with improved health access and greater health literacy."

This quote is very revealing in terms of what doctors are coming to realize in treating this epidemic. People who are metabolically healthy have much better survival rates and their symptoms are not as severe. Some of these statistics from NYC indicate overwhelmingly that 88% of the patients admitted to hospitals at have HBP and are obese. That's staggering. The comment about the need for patients to have greater health literacy is on the mark, and I would add that many medical professionals need to improve their health literacy as well. No longer can we afford to simply prescribe a drug to mask symptoms. Maybe some good will come out of this if we remember the real issues exposed during this time.
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  #94   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 09:12
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
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Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
The lesson here is that we should be focusing on everything possible to reduce these rates of diet-related diseases.

Almost all of those comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and obesity are linked to the common root cause of insulin resistance. According to one recent estimate, 88% of Americans having markers of insulin resistance, the root cause of the so-called “metabolic diseases,” that include obesity, Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This means only 12% of our population is well


Will the medical community take real action......?
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  #95   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 09:45
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
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There's no question in my mind that obesity comes with risk of diabetes. Risk is not a certainty, it's a risk. It may happen at different body weights for different people, some people may be very resistant to it, and at very high body fat levels--and a higher capacity to store fat subcutaneously is very often seen to be protective. It's likely what's behind pear versus apple shape health differences--and probably even with apple shape, whether that bigger upper half is due to increased visceral fat--Dr. Davis's wheat belly--or higher levels of subcutaneous fat in the upper region--probably makes a difference. Diagnosing an individual as this or that, or assuming they have something because of it would be wrong--but looking at populations, in terms of what's likely to be needed in this or that region for public health purposes, it's important. If you find a way for 1000 people to become less obese, you've found a way for a good number of people to be less diabetic. Targeting leaner people would cut down on thin outside, fat inside diabetes, but given overweight statistics in our society, fat inside fat outside is probably more common.
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  #96   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 09:48
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
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Plan: Atkins/LCHF/Keto
Stats: 195/158/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: Kansas City, MO
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This is a hugely important article. I’m going to figure out how to post it on my FB page, along with other factual and helpful information apart from the political nonsense.

Thank you, jey100, as always.
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  #97   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 11:28
thud123's Avatar
thud123 thud123 is offline
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Plan: Eat B4 Noon (2020 Q4)
Stats: 342.2/191/000 Male 182cm
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Progress: 44%
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Code:
https://wvumedicine.org/diabetes-obesity/2020/04/28/is-it-time-to-quarantine-junk-food-dr-mark-cucuzzella/


here's the link without the FaceBook click id on it from above
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  #98   ^
Old Thu, Apr-30-20, 11:32
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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Quote:
All of this suggests that health care needs to be augmented not just with more screening and treatments but with improved health access and greater health literacy.


Our present medical system will try to increase health literacy by further pushing low-fat, low saturated-fat, more seed oils as the healthy eating method. I have no indication that there will be a real soul-searching by the system to get to the real root cause.
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  #99   ^
Old Mon, May-04-20, 05:02
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Posts: 11,591
 
Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
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Sunday Times article Dr Malhotra had on his Twitter account. Maybe Demi can copy whole, but the link is here with digital access.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...onger-9vk9qgv2l

Quote:
Coronavirus: obese people at greater risk of death and may stay infectious for longer

Obese patients are more likely to end up in hospital with the coronavirus — and are more likely to die — than those who are a healthy weight.

Government scientists on the scientific advisory group for emergencies (Sage) are investigating whether the link between obesity and the virus is stronger than previously thought. New figures from the UK’s Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre found that the proportion of morbidly obese patients in intensive care units is twice the proportion in the general population.

The role of obesity was also in the spotlight last week after a doctor claimed that Boris Johnson had become so ill with the coronavirus because he is overweight.



And today, a new video/podcast with Dr. Mark Hyman, one hour with Dr. Malhotra. E160 - How Diet Is Driving COVID-19 Outcomes https://www.facebook.com/drmarkhyma...64038870764037/

Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, May-04-20 at 10:20.
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  #100   ^
Old Mon, May-04-20, 11:14
Merpig's Avatar
Merpig Merpig is offline
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Plan: EF/Fung IDM/keto
Stats: 375/225.4/175 Female 66.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 75%
Location: NE Florida
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<sigh>. Since I’ve been stalled for 11 years now on my LCHF diet, and still morbidly obese, I certainly have no prayer of getting un-obese during these Covid times. I assume I’ll die if I get the virus and I’m suffering from severe depression about it pretty much nonstop. I’m just staying self isolated and praying that is enough. Florida is starting to open up a lot now but not me.
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  #101   ^
Old Mon, May-04-20, 13:16
Zei Zei is online now
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Posts: 1,554
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Texas
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Debbie, since you're eating right and taking good care of yourself, maybe you're a lot more metabolically healthy than just size alone might predict and will be better off than your current hope.
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  #102   ^
Old Mon, May-04-20, 13:25
bevangel's Avatar
bevangel bevangel is offline
Posts: 2,288
 
Plan: modified adkins (sort of)
Stats: 265/176/167 Female 68.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 91%
Location: Austin, TX
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Quote:
Merpig wrote: I assume I’ll die if I get the virus and I’m suffering from severe depression about it pretty much nonstop.

Merpig dear,

I can only imagine that this drumbeat of news that obesity matters if one gets Covid-19 must be terribly distressing for you since you've been trying, but stalled, re losing weight all these years.

I feel confident that, even if your healthy eating habits have not resulted in weight loss - or at least not as much weight loss as you hoped for and wanted - you are HEALTHIER today than you would have been if you had continued eating SAD all those years. An LC WOE would have impacted your levels of inflammation in a positive way. So, if you should get infected, all those years of LC will have given you a much better chance to survive than if you hadn't been on LC. Don't you agree?

Even tho you may not have managed to get down to a "normal" BMI, no doubt low-carbing HAS helped keep you from going UP to an even higher BMI!

Try not to keep stressing about the possibility that this virus could kill you! Every single day, every one of us lives with the possibility that something COULD kill us. We could get run over by a bus while crossing the street. We could slip and fall in the shower. We could get bitten by a snake. We could choke on a bite of meat. etc. etc. etc. Focusing on all of the "possible" things that could kill us would make it impossible to ever LIVE life. So, we do what we can to avoid all the various possibilities and we relegate "monitoring" for various possibilities to some part of our brain that functions semi-automatically. I.e., when crossing a street, we look both ways automatically and never let the thought that "I could get killed" cause us stress. I live out in the country where snakes are numerous. (I killed one on my driveway last night!) I've learned to automatically watch where I put my feet when walking around outdoors! Except when I actually SEE a snake and have to go get an implement to kill it, I don't consciously think "I could get bitten by a snake" because, if I did, I'd be afraid to ever go outdoors!

Try to stop stressing. If you have done what you can do to reduce the risk that you'll catch this virus, and if you have practiced those actions until they're becoming subconscious, THAT IS ALL YOU CAN DO....except for maybe finding a way to stop stressing!

Seriously dear, if you keep stressing out, stress might kill you before the virus has a chance to.

Three suggestions: 1) STOP following and reading this particular thread! 2) Focus on something - ANYTHING - that makes you feel happy and in control, rather than depressed and a helpless victim. 3) Every time the thought of either Covid-19 or your weight crosses your mind, repeat the serenity prayer and then turn your attention to something that you CAN do something about to make life better, either for yourself or for someone else.
Quote:
grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.
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  #103   ^
Old Wed, May-06-20, 08:20
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,591
 
Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
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For some statistical criticism of UK press coverage about this topic, BBC's More or Less podcast: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000htw2

Medical News Today, Latest evidence on obesity and COVID-19. also less alarming. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ar...ty-and-covid-19
Calls for future studies to always include weight, height, glucose, and Insulin (rare that the role of insulin resistance is considered important to finding reasons for inflammation)

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, May-06-20 at 09:21.
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  #104   ^
Old Wed, May-06-20, 08:37
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,205
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Sunday Times article Dr Malhotra had on his Twitter account. Maybe Demi can copy whole, but the link is here with digital access.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...onger-9vk9qgv2l


As requested:

Quote:
Coronavirus: obese people at greater risk of death and may stay infectious for longer

Obese patients are more likely to end up in hospital with the coronavirus — and are more likely to die — than those who are a healthy weight.

Government scientists on the scientific advisory group for emergencies (Sage) are investigating whether the link between obesity and the virus is stronger than previously thought. New figures from the UK’s Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre found that the proportion of morbidly obese patients in intensive care units is twice the proportion in the general population.

The role of obesity was also in the spotlight last week after a doctor claimed that Boris Johnson had become so ill with the coronavirus because he is overweight.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a cardiologist who wrote The Pioppi Diet, a controversial take on Mediterranean food involving high fat and low carbohydrates, argued that Johnson’s build — at 5ft 9in, he had admitted weighing almost 16½ stone in 2018 — led him to need hospital treatment for the virus.

What is the evidence?

Research is still at an early stage but a study published last week found that the risk of dying from the coronavirus was 37% higher in overweight patients.

Scientists at the Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium, which looked at almost 17,000 hospital patients, found that having a BMI (body mass index) of more than 30 — defined as “obese” under NHS guidelines — is a significant factor associated with dying from the disease.

Data from the NHS has shown that 38% of those admitted to intensive care with the coronavirus are obese, compared with the 28% of the UK population in that group. A similar pattern was observed in America, where even young obese patients with no other health problems were becoming gravely ill with Covid-19.

Why are the obese at greater risk?

Many seriously overweight patients suffer breathing problems and researchers believe that reduced lung function is probably a major factor in the higher death rates. Fredrik Karpe, professor of metabolic medicine at Oxford University, said that if you have a larger stomach, when you lie down the extra weight pushes your diaphragm upwards, reducing lung capacity.

This may explain why the lungs of obese patients with Covid-19 fail faster than the lungs of those who are a healthy weight.

A second potential factor is greater inflammation of the fatty tissue around internal organs. This could contribute to a “cytokine storm”, a life-threatening overreaction by the immune system seen in some Covid-19 patients.

The obese are also more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, to have a poor diet and not take enough exercise — all of which increase the dangers of the coronavirus.

Are fatter nations hit worse?

Ministers have privately said that the high death toll in the UK may be partly explained by the obesity rate. However, other factors include the slow adoption of the lockdown, the lack of mass testing and tracing, international tourists continuing to arrive without any checks and the high population density of London, which allowed the virus to spread quickly.

Are there any other risks from obesity?

Some scientists believe obese patients may be infectious for longer. There is also speculation that when a vaccine is developed, it may be less effective in those who are severely overweight.

This is an extrapolation from research into flu, which found that vaccination provided less protection for the obese. A 2017 study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that 10% of extremely overweight participants developed flu despite being vaccinated, compared with 5% of participants who were a healthy weight.

Researchers suggested that the differences might indicate that T cells, part of the body’s immune response, could be impaired in the obese.

What should I do if I am overweight?

It is a good time to try to shed some inches, especially around the waist.

Most people, particularly men, tend to lose weight from the abdominal area first when they go on a diet.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the Imperial College epidemiologist, Karpe and Malhotra agree that a better diet will help you fight the virus.

Malhotra believes the prime minister could lead the nation: “Boris could set an example to us all by slimming down now he’s recovering.”

How to work out your BMI

Divide your weight in kilograms by your height (in metres) squared. So if you are 180cm tall and weigh 80 kilograms, your body mass index (BMI) is 80/(1.80²) = 24.7. A healthy BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9; between 25 and 29.9 means you’re overweight; 30-39.9 is obese; 40+ is morbidly obese.



Quote:
Obesity is blamed for Johnson’s coronavirus suffering

Boris Johnson was so badly affected by coronavirus because he is “significantly” overweight, a doctor said yesterday.

Aseem Malhotra, a cardiologist, said that risk of death from the disease increased ten-fold if the patient is obese.

He pointed out that “slimmer” members of the cabinet, such as Matt Hancock, recovered much more quickly and were not hospitalised.

The prime minister, 55, has long struggled with his weight and in 2018 he revealed he weighed almost 16 and a half stone, which at 5ft 9in puts him in the high-risk category. Dr Malhotra, speaking on Good Morning Britain on ITV, said the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention had discovered that there was an alarming link between death rates for Covid-19 and obesity.

He said: “I used to speak with one of [Mr Johnson’s] very senior advisers when he was London mayor a few years ago who expressed to me personally concerns about his weight.

“People with obesity also seem to spread the virus for a much longer period of time and also clearly get sicker. If you notice Chris Whitty, Matt Hancock and other members of the cabinet who got the virus, [they] did not get it as badly and they are essentially pretty slim.”

Dr Malhotra said that issues such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and heart disease all lead to Covid-19 complications.

He added: “This is really the elephant in the room. The Centre for Disease Control a few weeks ago did an analysis and put out the message that there is likely a ten-fold increase in death rates in people who have conditions linked to obesity, which basically include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.”

He explained that in Britain, more than half the population is classed as obese or overweight and that could be one reason the country had been hit so hard by the virus.

“When you look at the roots of all of this, even pre-Covid-19 it is well established now that poor diet is responsible for eleven million deaths per year,” he said.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...ering-pvphg2fmq
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  #105   ^
Old Wed, May-06-20, 09:25
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,591
 
Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
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Thank you, Demi! Talk about pressure for Boris to now lose a few.
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