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  #61   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-20, 05:21
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
An article from The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...id=tmg_share_em (Must subscribe)
Here's the original article referred to by Dr Malhotra:
Quote:
We need to talk about the uncomfortable link between obesity and coronavirus

Let's launch a national diet campaign now to save lives

For a month we have been looking at international stats on Covid-19 trying to piece together the puzzle. Men are worse affected than women, older people are more likely to suffer, those with underlying health issues are especially vulnerable, and BAME groups are disproportionately represented among critically ill patients.

Still, one pattern that has stimulated less discussion is the number of critically ill Covid-19 patients who are overweight or obese.

The scientific journal Nature stated on April 2nd: “Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension are the most common comorbidities in patients with coronavirus infections. Emerging evidence demonstrates an important direct metabolic and endocrine mechanistic link to the viral disease process.”

The same ailments keep emerging: diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. Data from the first 2204 Covid ICU admissions show 73 per cent were overweight, a condition linked to those diseases.

Not only does carrying more visceral weight put greater pressure on the lungs, excess body fat causes the immune system to dysfunction, instigating the cytokine storm that floods lungs causing pneumonia-like complications.

For decades successive governments have been negligent in tackling obesity head on. Whether it’s subservience to the food and drink industry that contributes almost £30bn to the economy, or an aversion to becoming a Nanny State, obesity has ballooned without concerted intervention. More than half of the British diet is ultra-processed food with 60 per cent of the population overweight.

The OECD places the UK the sixth most obese country in the world. South Korea, at the bottom of the table, has a far lower death rate from Covid-19.

Approximately only one in eight Brits are metabolically healthy. The Government’s own statistics say obesity causes over 30,000 deaths each year, cuts an average nine years off life and makes an individual more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure and five times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. The Department of Health estimates the cost of obesity to society is £27 billion a year, with annual spend on treatment greater than that spent on the police, fire service and judicial system combined.

During normal times, a government might shy away from interfering in the contents of people’s fridges. But we have a national health emergency, and for once, a captive audience. Yet without bankable advice to physically prepare for the virus, supermarket shelves are devoid of flour and sugar while Mr Kipling has reported an astronomical sales surge.

A controlled diet can start to reverse high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes in weeks. I can vouch for that. I am whipping a septuagenarian parent into shape, and in three weeks, they have lost three kilograms and have registered a marked change in blood pressure that should lead to coming off medication.

For the first time in living history, the public are stuck at home cooking for themselves while glued to the airwaves desperate to know how to protect themselves. Changing habits is said to take three weeks, the time it takes to see improvement in metabolic health following significant dietary change. We have at least three weeks more of lockdown to come.

Not only would a massive public campaign on diet save lives from Covid-19, it would change the course of our nation’s health forever.
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  #62   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-20, 06:09
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teaser teaser is online now
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I doubt the supply chain can handle a sudden change to a better diet by the general population. This is a war we have to win over time--any one of us, lots of us, can improve our diet in the short term, in the long term, the amounts of various types of food would have to be changed to accomodate more healthy eaters.
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  #63   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-20, 07:12
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
I doubt the supply chain can handle a sudden change to a better diet by the general population. This is a war we have to win over time--any one of us, lots of us, can improve our diet in the short term, in the long term, the amounts of various types of food would have to be changed to accomodate more healthy eaters.


Very true, and we are not going to see a sudden rapid change. Even under threat of death: that was, after all, true before the current crisis.
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  #64   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-20, 08:09
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To the points made in the previous posts, the number of deaths caused by metabolic syndrome are massive and far exceed those caused by Covid-19 by a long shot and over a far longer period of time. Given that the associated symptoms in these MS-caused deaths are similar to those of the most vulnerable to Covid-19, it's the chaotic and conflicting health and dietary information that serves to NOT shine a spotlight on metabolic syndrome caused deaths, but identifies the same symptoms and associated conditions in the context of Covid-19. Obesity is along for the ride, and while those who are obese can experience more serious and fatal consequences, identifying and blunting the root cause is not that complicated. Unfortunately, the public is confused as the primary health agencies who are also influenced/ confused by food manufacturers do not share and support this awareness. One would think that in a different world, the reaction to metabolic syndrome caused disease would have the medical communities' collective hair on fire. The irony is deep and sad.
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  #65   ^
Old Fri, Apr-24-20, 12:24
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
The irony is deep and sad.


Especially since "official" mainstream information is the complete opposite of what we know is correct. So we look like an unwrapped conspiracy person instead of science-supporters.

This does chap my sit-upon.
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  #66   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-20, 01:53
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Blood sugar levels may influence vulnerability to coronavirus, and controlling them through conventional means might be protective

https://theconversation.com/blood-s...otective-136592
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  #67   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-20, 02:31
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Coronavirus and obesity: Doctors take aim at food industry over poor diets

A cardiologist has blamed the food industry for ‘normalising’ ultra-processed junk food as more evidence emerges suggesting poor diet is the root cause behind increased mortality from Covid-19.

https://www.foodnavigator.com/Artic...over-poor-diets
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  #68   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-20, 05:21
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I am impressed by how much the metabolic dysfunction contribution is getting support in all this new research.

Honestly, I am used to these kinds of things getting shouted down and buried, but with such a dire situation all over the world, I think the mindset has shifted greatly.

It's one thing for the bad outcome to be measured in years; another in days.
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  #69   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-20, 05:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I am impressed by how much the metabolic dysfunction contribution is getting support in all this new research.

Honestly, I am used to these kinds of things getting shouted down and buried, but with such a dire situation all over the world, I think the mindset has shifted greatly.

It's one thing for the bad outcome to be measured in years; another in days.


Let's hope the focus on metabolic syndrome doesn't fade when things calm down some and also let's hope that diet is seen as the way to prevent or reverse metabolic disease rather than reliance on medications to manage symptoms.
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  #70   ^
Old Sat, Apr-25-20, 06:06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
Let's hope the focus on metabolic syndrome doesn't fade when things calm down some and also let's hope that diet is seen as the way to prevent or reverse metabolic disease rather than reliance on medications to manage symptoms.


As soon as I discovered that COVID-19 triggered cytokine storms, like the 1918 influenza, I suspected inflammation had to be a core issue here. Not just immune system as in "don't catch it," since everyone seems to catch it. But its severity seems to be in direct correlation with how well the person's immune system is actually working.
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  #71   ^
Old Sun, Apr-26-20, 02:51
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Deadly Immune Response in the Flu and Possibly COVID-19

Glucose metabolism plays a key role in the cytokine storm seen in influenza, and the link could have potential implications for novel coronavirus infections


https://www.scientificamerican.com/...ibly-covid-191/
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  #72   ^
Old Sun, Apr-26-20, 04:26
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
Let's hope the focus on metabolic syndrome doesn't fade when things calm down some and also let's hope that diet is seen as the way to prevent or reverse metabolic disease rather than reliance on medications to manage symptoms.

This is my main concern that making simple lifestyle changes to reverse metabolic disease will be buried in the post-Covid19 tailwinds.
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  #73   ^
Old Sun, Apr-26-20, 09:39
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Default Blood sugar control and COVID-19

Dysfunctional metabolic link to immune system becomes clearer.

Quote:
How Blood Sugar Can Trigger a Deadly Immune Response in the Flu and Possibly COVID-19

Glucose metabolism plays a key role in the cytokine storm seen in influenza, and the link could have potential implications for novel coronavirus infections

Many of the people dying in the novel coronavirus pandemic appear to be harmed more by their own immune system than by the virus itself. The infection can trigger a cytokine storm—a surge in cell-signaling proteins that prompt inflammation—that hits the lungs, attacking tissues and potentially resulting in organ failure and death. But this phenomenon is not unique to COVID-19; it sometimes occurs in severe influenza, too. Now a study sheds light on one of the metabolic mechanisms that help orchestrate such runaway inflammation.


I have been a year and four months into throwing out management of my autoimmune condition with drugs. My experience convinced me that Dr Teresa Wahls is on the right track with diet.

People seem to die from cytokine storms when they have a dysfunctional immune system. Not an "overactive" one. That's the mistake they will continue to make in jumping in with drugs instead of making people healthy.

Quote:
iven the role of glucose in the pathway, could a person’s diet have an effect on his or her response to a viral infection? “That’s a very good question,” Wen says. “At this moment, I think it’s too early to make a judgment [about whether] a special diet can fight against virus infection.” What scientists do know is that people with type 2 diabetes are more susceptible to severe flu infections. But that risk is not because they have higher glucose levels in their blood. The real reason, Wen says, is that they cannot use glucose effectively—and thus cannot initiate a proper antiviral response.

Ultimately, the hope is that by interfering with this glucose metabolism pathway, we might be able to stave off the deadly cytokine storms seen in severe cases of flu or COVID-19. But Lu’s team has not yet done studies in people. “At the moment, we do not have data in patients demonstrating the effect of interference with energy metabolism,” he says. “It is too early to make a conclusion about the potential clinical use.”

Last edited by WereBear : Sun, Apr-26-20 at 09:48. Reason: Tablet typos
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  #74   ^
Old Sun, Apr-26-20, 10:02
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Quote:
Given the role of glucose in the pathway, could a person’s diet have an effect on his or her response to a viral infection? “That’s a very good question,” Wen says. “At this moment, I think it’s too early to make a judgment [about whether] a special diet can fight against virus infection.” What scientists do know is that people with type 2 diabetes are more susceptible to severe flu infections. But that risk is not because they have higher glucose levels in their blood. The real reason, Wen says, is that they cannot use glucose effectively—and thus cannot initiate a proper antiviral response.

Ultimately, the hope is that by interfering with this glucose metabolism pathway, we might be able to stave off the deadly cytokine storms seen in severe cases of flu or COVID-19. But Lu’s team has not yet done studies in people. “At the moment, we do not have data in patients demonstrating the effect of interference with energy metabolism,” he says. “It is too early to make a conclusion about the potential clinical use.”

So the conclusion is that the "real reason" is "they cannot use glucose effectively-- and thus cannot initiate a proper antiviral response." Did the thought occur that the reason they can't use glucose effectively just may be due to exceedingly high BG over the years, thus making these folks insulin resistant??? Thus preventing them from using glucose effectively??? You just couldn't make this up. Yes, the on-ramp for drugs enabling the effective use of glucose is in place . . . . .
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  #75   ^
Old Mon, Apr-27-20, 00:22
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Demi Demi is offline
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Dr Aseem Malhotra's article on the front page of today's Telegraph in the UK:

Quote:
Is it time for an honest conversation about the risks of excess weight?

There is a far higher risk of death from Covid-19 for those with obesity and its associated conditions says a leading cardiologist

Aseem Malhotra


No one chooses to be fat. Social scientists from The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) conducted an international poll to find out what matters most to people for their general wellbeing.

Good health was revealed as the number one priority, so how can this be squared with the fact that 60% of the UK’s adult population is now overweight or obese?

As pointed out in the New England Journal of Medicine: “food choices are often automatic and made without full conscious awareness.” Despite wishing to lose weight, we’re still tempted to buy the chocolate bar at the checkout till.

Yet as the country is gripped by the Coronavirus crisis, being overweight and its associated health risks are being highlighted as never before.
There is a staggering ten-fold increased risk of death from COVID-19 for those with obesity and the conditions associated with metabolic syndrome such as type 2 diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome, which is caused by excess body fat, is defined as any three of a cluster of five conditions; increased blood pressure, excess body fat around the waist, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol levels.

Data from America reveals only 1 in 8 adults is metabolically healthy, including less than 1 in 3 with a normal BMI of under 25.

Those with obesity and metabolic diseases already have some degree of mild ongoing chronic inflammation in the body and appear to have an impaired immune response to coronavirus that ultimately causes the cytokine storm (an overreaction of the bodies immune system) leading to respiratory failure and death in a tragic minority.

This, by the way, might also be one of the most plausible explanations so far as to why those from BAME backgrounds are more at risk of COVID-19 complications as they have a three to fourfold increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome than Caucasians. Vitamin D deficiency may also play a role.

Excess body fat produces inflammatory molecules in the body which over time slowly damage organs. Chronically raised insulin, driven by regularly eating high glycaemic index products (typical of ultra-processed foods) also appears to be the driving force behind a series of conditions; type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and possibly even cancer and dementia.

As pointed out by Professor Robert Lustig, Paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California, San Francisco, “ultra-processed food sets you up for inflammation that COVID-19 is happy to exploit. Just another way ultra-processed food kills.”

The food industry has exploited people’s emotional urges by saturating the food environment to maximise sales opportunities. They have managed to make cheap junk food available to anyone, anywhere at any time. Not surprisingly more than 50% of the calories consumed in the British Diet is now classified as ultra-processed food or what obesity researcher Dr Zoe Harcombe more pertinently describes as “fake food”.

Quote:
Coronavirus cases: a breakdown of the first critical care patients

Obesity
: Almost 72 per cent of those admitted to critical care with coronavirus were overweight, including 40 per cent who were obese. Obesity can cause a range of health conditions, which may make the virus more deadly. In addition, it can exacerbate breathing problems, experts said. The study found that almost 28 per cent of those admitted to intensive care units with coronavirus were a healthy weight, while just 0.6 per cent were underweight.

Gender: The research found 70.9 per cent of patients in such units were male, while 29.1 per cent were female. This is in line with previous studies which found that the virus was far more deadly in men. These showed that of all suspected cases, 1.7 percent of women who contract the virus would die compared with 2.8 percent of men. Some experts believe the sex imbalance relates to a higher prevalence of smoking or chronic alcohol use among men, while others think men are more likely to have underlying health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, making them more vulnerable to an infection.

Age: The average age of those being admitted to ITU units suffering from coronavirus was almost 63. Health experts have been most concerned about older patients, because international studies suggest a mortality rate of around 15 per cent in the over-80s, compared with a rate of less than 0.5 per cent in those under the age of 50. Medics in the UK have noted that many of those being treated in intensive care units seem younger than they would have expected, a point confirmed by the new data. The study also found most patients were living independent lives, in contrast to expectations that most of those admitted to intensive care would be frail.

Underlying conditions: The study examined the number of those in critical care who were suffering from “severe comorbidities” – conditions that might be expected to shorten their lives. Here, levels were low, with 4 per cent found to be suffering renal problems, 3.7 per cent found to be immunocompromised, and 3 per cent suffering from lung conditions. At the most, 18 of all 196 patients were classed as suffering from severe conditions, and even this number may be overestimated, as some patients may have been counted in more than one category. However, experts stress that a range of far more common health problems – such as diabetes – were not included in the audit.

Such items are usually mass-produced highly palatable packaged foods, devoid of nutrients and fibre, high in sugar, starch, unhealthy oils, additives and preservatives. As they don’t make us feel full, they encourage us to eat more. Numerous international observational studies have linked their consumption to obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and even cancer.

Even our hospitals have become a branding opportunity for the junk food industry with three-quarters of food purchased in hospitals classified as unhealthy.

Just don’t eat it, I hear you say. Yet it’s not so easy. One study in the USA revealed that people who visited paediatric institutions which sold fast food on site were four times more likely to purchase such products when they left the hospital than those that didn’t visit the hospital in the first place.

The evidence is so clear of the harmful halo effect of these products that The BMA, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and even NHS England have made policy calls to stop the sale of junk food in hospitals.

Given the oversupply of cheap sugary foods exercising personal responsibility becomes an illusion. To practise it one needs knowledge, choice, access and affordability. And education is clearly ineffective when the food environment is working against you. As such it’s no surprise that a 2017 study published in the BMJ found more than 50% of the NHS’s 1.4 million employees are themselves overweight and one in four nurses are obese.

Until individual hospital chief executives act to sever contracts that ensure that crisps, chocolates and sugary drinks are delivered to the bedside of patients on the wards and make the default food healthy and nutritious, sickness will be continued to be sold in the hospital grounds.

The recent publicity of Krispy Creme Donuts and Dominoes Pizza giving away free items to NHS staff is another “cynical marketing ploy” according to a senior dietitian who prefers not to be named. Award-winning food writer Joanna Blythman told me: “we need to wise up and see this corporate philanthropy as the blatant marketing strategy that it is: an attempt to portray these brands’ unhealthy products as a reward for our real health heroes.”

But these dirty tricks are not new. In the 1950s under threat from public anxiety of the adverse health effects of smoking Big Tobacco used images of doctors in advertisements to assure consumers that their brands were safe.
One cigarette won’t kill you and neither will one doughnut. Yet poor diet is now responsible for 11 million deaths a year; more disease and death than smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity combined.

Some on social media argue that this is “not the time” to be stressing the importance of a healthy diet. But if not now when? “We know poor metabolic health increases the lethality of COVID-19, but what the profession doesn’t fully appreciate is how rapidly these risk markers improve from dietary changes. I regularly see in clinical practice massive improvements in blood glucose of my type 2 diabetic patients within two to three days of cutting starch and sugar,” says Royal College of General Practitioners clinical advisor on metabolic health Dr Campbell Murdoch.

Former MEP Alexandra Phillips noted that in just three weeks of cutting out starch and sugar her mum has lost 3kg and is close to coming off blood pressure pills she’s been taking for years.

These recoveries are well documented in the medical literature; 25-50% of those with type 2 diabetes are able to send their condition into remission within a few months of cutting out refined carbohydrates from their diet. But the overwhelming majority of doctors are either not aware or are not conditioned to pay much attention to diet; understandable when there’s little to no nutrition education in medical school.

In my view, Public Health England and the government are grossly negligent by not telling the public explicitly that they need to change their diet now to not just improve population health, but protect the NHS from potentially another viral pandemic in the next decade.

And backed with policies that address improving the food environment such as banning junk food advertising, taxing ultra-processed food and making healthier food more affordable and available it’s conceivable one would see marked improvements to population health within one electoral term.

Let’s also not forget the importance of regular physical activity for metabolic health. But remember you can’t outrun a bad diet.

Losing body fat could potentially reduce one’s risk of suffering the worst complications of Coronavirus in just a matter of weeks. Cutting out junk and just modest increases in whole fruit and veg, nuts and seeds and omega 3 fats could also potentially halve the death rates from heart attack and stroke, whilst simultaneously reducing obesity, type 2 diabetes and many cancers. Until then let’s make the message loud and clear. If we want to really fix our health, we need to fix the food.


Dr Aseem Malhotra is an Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the Lister Hospital, Stevenage.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...-excess-weight/

Last edited by Demi : Mon, Apr-27-20 at 01:52.
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