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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 02:33
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Dementia link to inflammation of brain boosts treatment hopes

Dementia link to inflammation of brain boosts treatment hopes

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...hopes-q83vlh8dl

Quote:
Inflammation in the brain appears to play a larger role in different forms of dementia than had been thought, according to a study that raises hope for new types of treatment.

Cambridge University researchers found that by mapping the location of inflammation they could identify and distinguish three types of frontotemporal dementia, a condition that hits people as early as their thirties and affects about 16,000 in Britain. The scientists have also discovered that levels of inflammation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia, are a powerful indicator of how aggressively their symptoms are likely to progress.

James Rowe, of the university’s department of clinical neurosciences, said: “This research gives us a green light to explore anti-inflammatory strategies for dementia . . . Brain inflammation is seen before symptoms, it matches the areas of brain damage and it predicts a fast or slow decline.”

Inflammation seems to be locked into a vicious circle with “junk proteins” such as tau that accumulate in the brain. “Breaking this cycle with targeted immune-based treatments for the brain could slow or prevent the dementia,” Professor Rowe added.

There is no cure at present for frontotemporal dementia or any treatment that will slow it down. The effects on families can be huge, because it progresses more rapidly than Alzheimer’s, often affecting people of working age with dependent children, and because it can be inherited.

Inflammation is usually the body’s response to injury and stress such as the redness and swelling that accompanies an injury or infection. However, inflammation in the brain, known as neuro-inflammation, can be harmful. It has been linked to depression, psychosis and multiple sclerosis.

For the study, researchers recruited 31 patients with three different types of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). One type, called behavioural variant, affects personality and behaviour, making people less empathetic and more impulsive and likely to engage in inappropriate behaviour.

Another form, called semantic dementia, means people lose their knowledge of words and objects. A third type, called non-fluent aphasia, affects a person’s ability to use language, often causing slow and fragmented speech.

By injecting subjects with a special dye and then taking positron emission tomography (Pet) scans of their brains, the researchers could predict which form of dementia a subject was likely to have. For instance, those with the personality variant tended to have inflammation in the frontal lobe, a region associated with behaviour, thought and planning and which seems to help people comply with social mores. Pet scans also showed that in all three forms of the disease inflammation took place in areas where toxic proteins accumulated inside the brain. The scanning research was backed up by microscopic analysis of brain post-mortem tissue from donors to the Cambridge Brain Bank.

“We expected a link between inflammation in the brain and the build-up of damaging proteins, but even we were surprised by how tightly these two problems mapped on to each other,” Thomas Cope from the Department of Clinical Neurosciences said.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 04:13
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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“We expected a link between inflammation in the brain and the build-up of damaging proteins, but even we were surprised by how tightly these two problems mapped on to each other,” Thomas Cope from the Department of Clinical Neurosciences said.


I don't think anyone who "gets" Diabetes Type III is surprised, though, because it turns out so much chronic illness is about inflammation. Mine certainly was!

Best book on the subject is Sugar Crush. It will scare you savory
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 07:25
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Originally Posted by WereBear
Best book on the subject is Sugar Crush. It will scare you savory


I did a search for the book at our library. They don't have it but this one popped up: Twinkie, deconstructed : my journey to discover how the ingredients found in processed foods are grown, mined (yes, mined), and manipulated into what America eats.

Sounds interesting, so I'm going to check it out.
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 08:24
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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For the study, researchers recruited 31 patients with three different types of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). One type, called behavioural variant, affects personality and behaviour, making people less empathetic and more impulsive and likely to engage in inappropriate behaviour.

Another form, called semantic dementia, means people lose their knowledge of words and objects. A third type, called non-fluent aphasia, affects a person’s ability to use language, often causing slow and fragmented speech.


THis is interesting to me. With my stokes all in the frontal lobe, and both my son and I with ADD and Asbergers. Both of us exhibit a mild form of these "disabilities".

For me, I cannot recall words easily when they are to be spoken. TO type, the process is usually easier, much easier. BUt to create spoken words, often that fails and there are gaps in my sentence, which my kids love to fill in. lol Otherwise I must make a picture of the word, either its spelling or a pictorial, and then say that identifying word.

I cant help but believe our foods and the contaminants we ingest of breath in play a part. And genetics, of course.

Much to think about.
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Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 11:20
Zei Zei is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I don't think anyone who "gets" Diabetes Type III is surprised, though, because it turns out so much chronic illness is about inflammation. Mine certainly was!

Best book on the subject is Sugar Crush. It will scare you savory

I read it a few years ago. As I recall the crush refers to how swelling of tissue crushes against your nerves damaging them as a side effect of sugar; the diabetic type of nerve damage.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Mar-17-20, 13:29
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear

Best book on the subject is Sugar Crush. It will scare you savory


Yes me too, that's the best book I ever read about the subject!
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Mar-19-20, 03:12
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Originally Posted by Zei
I read it a few years ago. As I recall the crush refers to how swelling of tissue crushes against your nerves damaging them as a side effect of sugar; the diabetic type of nerve damage.


Exactly. The more I read about it, the more it fits an addictive drug profile; because it does do damage; directly and quickly. We just don't realize it.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Mar-19-20, 03:21
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s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
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to me, inflammation of the brain means stress, too much sugar, to little sleep (according to Dr. Mathew Walker, when amyloid plaques are cleaned out - get your 7-9 hours every night - you cannot make up a sleep deficit), and vegetable oils / aka seed oils, and lack of exercise (since exercise, like sleep, to me it cleans house up there). of course there are more than that - but i do what i can when i can to keep my head in the game.
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, Mar-24-20, 04:53
roweatery roweatery is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I don't think anyone who "gets" Diabetes Type III is surprised, though, because it turns out so much chronic illness is about inflammation. Mine certainly was!

Best book on the subject is Sugar Crush. It will scare you savory


This book made me feel very conscious with what I put in my mouth lol.
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