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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Jan-23-20, 02:31
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Keto/IF
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Default January crash diets are a fat lot of good

January crash diets are a fat lot of good

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...-good-36cptktkm

Quote:
A new book shows counting calories and switching to processed foods is wrecking our bodies

it’s new year, time for new diets and new theories on why the world is getting inexorably fatter. Evenings out are not a lot of fun. I am surrounded by friends looking glumly into their water glasses over dinner, refusing wine and cheese, butter and steak, looking anxiously at the apps on their wrists to check whether they’ve hit 12,000 steps or 1,200 calories. Others decide not to come out at all. Why be dull in company when they could be scourging themselves with a couple of hours at Pilates or the gym?

Andrew Jenkinson is a bariatric surgeon who has spent 15 years studying this issue, treating people who’ve been tortured beyond endurance by trying to control their weight. His agonised patients have been reporting that they do what’s recommended, losing weight on any and every diet, only to gain it all back and more. Jenkinson began to wonder why. In his new book, Why We Eat (Too Much), he’s concluded that most official advice about diet, exercise and health is wrong.

A calorie is not just a calorie, regardless of where it is from. A carbohydrate-based, low-fat, meat-minimising regime, like the government’s EatWell plate, is wrecking our bodies. Saturated fat from steak or butter does not make us fat, and the processed vegetable oils we’ve been advised to eat for years are a terrible substitute.

“Eat less and exercise more” is misleading and simplistic. That’s not how bodies function. Low-calorie diets are a disaster. They work in the short term, only to rebound as the body determinedly lowers its metabolic rate and ups its fat storage to protect against future famines.

Jenkinson wants solutions because he knows how recent and overwhelming the global weight problem is. Obesity only began to climb in the late Seventies, after America produced guidelines recommending diets low in saturated fat, and the sugar, oils and processed food in the world’s intake started to soar. That’s what’s disrupting our bodies’ inbuilt weight controls.

Now most of us live in obesogenic environments, fighting fatness, surrounded by unnatural food and plagued by newly widespread diseases: high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, depression and cancer.

The consequence is that the life expectancy for a working-class man is 73, the same as for a Victorian man once he had survived past the age of five. Medical advances have been nullified by lifestyle diseases which our expensive healthcare system is struggling to treat. The big question Jenkinson asks is: shall we simply firefight? Or deal with the cause?

His key insight is that weight isn’t chosen by our conscious mind. Our bodies are designed to keep our weight at a set point. That set point, dictating how much fat we carry, how hungry we feel and whether our metabolic rate ratchets up or down in response to diets or overeating, is controlled by chemical messages from our unconscious brain. We can override those in the short term but in the long term the body’s insistent demands and mechanisms always triumph.

That set point is decided by our environment, history and genes. People with thrifty genes, because their ancestors survived inhospitable environments, like Solomon Islanders, will put on weight more easily, as will the children of obese mothers. Others will burn off excess. In general though, the sharp rise in sugar, carbohydrates and unnatural fats has created a mass disruption of that set point upwards.

Losing weight is not a matter of willpower but of resetting it downwards, changing the environmental signals the body receives. That’s what Jenkinson prescribes.

His message is for individuals wanting help, not industry or government, who may block their ears. It’s one of enjoyment, not deprivation, summed up by “eat more, rest more”. The first priority is to slash insulin, which drives fat storage. Sugar, corn and modern bread are banned but he doesn’t advocate the misery of a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet. Potatoes and rice are fine.

His next priority is to rebalance our essential fats, omega 6 and omega 3. Humans evolved to eat 3 and 6 in ratios of between 1:1 and 1:4. Omega 3 is in green leaves and vegetables, and anything that eats leaves or algae, from cows to fish. It cuts inflammation and keeps cells flexible. But it goes off fast and has no shelf life, so it has been ruthlessly cut from modern foods and from intensively farmed animals’ feed, replaced by omega 6 from seeds like rape and soybean, which increase inflammation.

Jenkinson points out that countries which still have high omega 3 ratios, like Japan, have low obesity. But in some western cities the ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 is 1:50, meaning almost none of the critically necessary omega 3 is reaching our cells. We must reverse that.

He wants us to make time for the pleasure of preparing unprocessed, home-cooked food; good meat, fish, dairy and vegetables. Eating keeps the metabolic rate high and the rituals of having meals together makes us happy. Resting and sleeping more cuts stress and hunger hormones.

Exercising three times a week, for 20 minutes, is vital, not to work off food directly but to build muscle, lower insulin and reduce the set point for our weight.

He promises no incredible solutions, no drastic fat loss, no scourging or short-term January misery, just a gradual improvement in metabolic health, weight and wellbeing over months and years. I hope he’s listened to.



Quote:
Why We Eat (Too Much): The New Science of Appetite

by Dr Andrew Jenkinson (Author)

A practical, accessible guide to understanding the diet myth and the secret to lasting weight loss.

For over two decades, weight loss surgeon Dr Andrew Jenkinson has treated thousands of people who have become trapped in the endless cycle of dieting. Why We Eat (Too Much), combines case studies from his practice and the new science of metabolism to illuminate how our appetite really works.

Debunking the great myths of the body, and systematically explaining why dieting is counter-productive, this unflinching book investigates every aspect of nutrition. From the difference between good and bad fats to the impact of genes and genetic mutation on our weight and what happens to our hormones long after a diet ends, Dr Jenkinson explores the fields of agriculture, pharma, anthropology and medicine to uncover the truth behind our bad food habits and the escalating obesity crisis.


https://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-We-Eat.../dp/024140052X/

https://www.amazon.com/Why-We-Eat-T.../dp/024140052X/

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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 05:35
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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Good for him! He'd have a front row seat for when bariatric surgery doesn't work.

I can't find straight info about who regains after surgery, and how much. It's like trying to find out how many people gain dozens of pounds after being put on anti-depressants. For every blog that describes this near-inevitability, there's an official release claiming it averages five pounds!

But I know it's a lot of people.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 05:54
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Posts: 4,668
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
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Location: Vermont
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His message is for individuals wanting help, not industry or government, who may block their ears. It’s one of enjoyment, not deprivation, summed up by “eat more, rest more”. The first priority is to slash insulin, which drives fat storage. Sugar, corn and modern bread are banned but he doesn’t advocate the misery of a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet. Potatoes and rice are fine.

First of all, as we here know, it is not a misery and secondly, at least for me, rice and potatoes are binge worthy foods which I imagine drive insulin also and staying away from them, which I have for years, is an essential part of my plan. The assumption that eating low carb keto is a misery is what drives these stupid statements which are just concessions to a belief system about what gives pleasure and what doesn't and the role food has in obtaining that pleasure. My mantra is if you want the results you have to create the causes and part of the cause for me is eliminating rice and potatoes (and other so-called healthy grains) with the result of a healthy weight, lowered blood sugar and decreased body fat. Now that's pleasure.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 06:54
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
The assumption that eating low carb keto is a misery is what drives these stupid statements which are just concessions to a belief system about what gives pleasure and what doesn't and the role food has in obtaining that pleasure.


I have seen this in action, and it gets me so upset.

One was a coworker about a decade older who was overweight, depressed, miserable, and fending off diabetes/autoimmune. A sadly common combo which would have taken me down had I not explored low carb with such devotion.

I backslid over the years, but never more than 15 pounds, and my health didn't crash until I let the carbs creep to nearly 100 a day.

So, over the years, she saw my successes, but could never even try it: her nightly pint of gourmet ice cream and spectacular dinner parties were her only pleasures, and she couldn't see how new pleasures would expand her world and make her happier.

Her example of what loomed before me if I gave up did help me negotiate all the different twists and turns of my own journey; and the success, both health and weight-wise, I enjoy now.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 07:13
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bkloots bkloots is offline
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Plan: Atkins/LCHF/Keto
Stats: 195/161/150 Female 63in
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Location: Kansas City, MO
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Ah yes...a NEW BOOK!! Well, I think the essential message is okay. And most of us who follow an LC way of eating (not "diet") know how many variations there are, and also that there's nothing miserable about steak and butter.

We also know that it's not mystery and magic. It's finding a way of eating you can live with forever. And many of us have found, even with great success in our histories, that life (and weight) can still have its ups and downs.

On the whole, low-carbohydrate has achieved a level of scientific support. And the processed food industry and its government cronies have been held accountable in a much more visible way.

Nobody asks me anymore about my weight management success. I've looked about the same (to them) for fifty years. But if asked, I'm happy to suggest Taubes's Why We Get Fat as a great guide.

For newbies, perhaps this new book will be helpful. Not too extreme. Mostly truthful.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 07:44
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Benay Benay is offline
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Plan: Atkins
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Both my brothers, older than I, developed type II diabetes and eventually congestive heart failure as well as degenerative myelopathy.

"Little sister's" advice on eating low-carb was rejected in favor of the diabetic nurse's nutritional advice. They were both on metformin. Both ate sugary foods. One brother, in hospital, was given chocolate cake despite having diabetic on his chart. After discharge he bragged about how good the pancakes and syrup were at breakfast. The other brother routinely ate ice cream and cookies. They thought the metformin would control their blood sugar spikes from the foods they ate. To my regret, both brothers have died. Were their deaths preventable if they had had good dietary advice? I just don't know.

A friend wants to lose 30 pounds and is doing IF - but she admits she is not doing well on low carb. When I send her the information about the interaction of carbs and insulin secretion, she just tosses it.

It always puzzles me that people don't want to know the physiology of eating. Don't really want information that contradicts what "Joe Blow" told them.
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 10:17
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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I'm sorry about your brothers. I have one who has diabetes now, and was doing well on lowcarb advice from his two Paleo leaning siblings. But his job is hectic and his social life revolves around football.

He didn't stick with it.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 13:04
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teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Potatoes and rice sound more like misery to me--unless you add in the stuff that fits into the misery of a ketogenic diet. Butter, sour cream, fatty pork...


Quote:
They work in the short term, only to rebound as the body determinedly lowers its metabolic rate and ups its fat storage to protect against future famines.


I still don't quite agree with this, it makes it sound like yo-yo dieting is why we get fatter on the SAD as the years go by. Studies do show a weight gain overshoot when people/animals are starved and then refed, but it's not to the point of obesity and sort of sorts itself out if people just stop dieting for long enough. That is--if they were eating a diet that wasn't making them fat in the first place. Eating the SAD for years, without dieting--people and animals get fat. If they diet and lose weight, that just reverses the course during the diet--and then when they go back to not dieting, back to eating the SAD, they're back on that course of weight gain that preceded the diet. We don't get fat because we diet--we diet because the cruddy modern diet was making us fat in the first place.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 14:27
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
My mantra is if you want the results you have to create the causes and part of the cause for me is eliminating rice and potatoes (and other so-called healthy grains) with the result of a healthy weight, lowered blood sugar and decreased body fat. Now that's pleasure.

I share your mantra, Jean. The definition of pleasure related to food consumption has become so distorted today, that taking away chocolate cake or sweets in general gets emotional reactions. Food taken correctly shouldn't play on one's emotions, but it does. That's the first warning sign. When people I know attempt low carb, I usually am not surprised that when eventually confronted with these myths about the negative aspects of low carb/ keto, they think they have a reason to bail. It's a human reaction to the mindset that they are punishing themselves by withholding the foods they find satisfying. The irony is that any information from the so-called nutrition "experts" questioning low carb provides an immediate stimulus to quit. The "What in the world was I thinking?" reaction. But why? The way food is defined in the 21st century is extremely different today than how it was defined and consumed at any other time in history. We've been stealthily force adapted to processed carbage without even knowing it. It's been so gradual, that most haven't even noticed it, as we constantly adapt to the new normal.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Jan-24-20, 20:07
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Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,514
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
His message is for individuals wanting help, not industry or government, who may block their ears. It’s one of enjoyment, not deprivation, summed up by “eat more, rest more”. The first priority is to slash insulin, which drives fat storage. Sugar, corn and modern bread are banned but he doesn’t advocate the misery of a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet. Potatoes and rice are fine.

First of all, as we here know, it is not a misery and secondly, at least for me, rice and potatoes are binge worthy foods which I imagine drive insulin also and staying away from them, which I have for years, is an essential part of my plan. The assumption that eating low carb keto is a misery is what drives these stupid statements which are just concessions to a belief system about what gives pleasure and what doesn't and the role food has in obtaining that pleasure. My mantra is if you want the results you have to create the causes and part of the cause for me is eliminating rice and potatoes (and other so-called healthy grains) with the result of a healthy weight, lowered blood sugar and decreased body fat. Now that's pleasure.
I certainly are not miserable on my (mostly) ketogenic eating plan. My food tastes great and I get to eat the foods that make me feel good after a meal. I realize that it's been only 17 years that I've been eating low-carb and high fat and that maybe one year I'll suddenly decide that I'd rather chow down on mouse food, but I doubt it.
My dad and two of my brothers were type 2 diabetics and did the recommended diabetes eating plan and all three died from heart problems related to diabetes. I'm quite a few years older now that they were when they died and the health issues I had are not related to diet.
Before I low-carbed, I did the low-fat recommended diet and ended up heavier, pre-diabetic and on statins and 3 other drugs. It didn't take long after I dropped carbs and embraced fat, for me to get off the drugs.
I truly believe that if I had continued the low-fat, high-carb eating system I would be dead.
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  #11   ^
Old Sat, Jan-25-20, 06:12
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
I truly believe that if I had continued the low-fat, high-carb eating system I would be dead.


I have an "eerie mirror" in a good friend. We are only weeks apart in age, have similar jobs, and juggle a lot of stress.

She's miserable, depressed, has an array of issues and medications, and just added a new weekly injection for her diabetes.

I went a different path, and I wish she would follow my example.
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Jan-25-20, 08:10
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
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Plan: Atkins/LCHF/Keto
Stats: 195/161/150 Female 63in
BF:
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Location: Kansas City, MO
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I'm sad to read several posts here about siblings who have died while continuing their prescribed (or preferred) eating habits. I have three siblings, one a doctor. Only the doctor, it seems, has fallen into the SAD life, owing to many everyday stresses. He probably knows better, but....

Hope the new year brings new resolve to everyone here! It's not like we're deprived, right?
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  #13   ^
Old Sat, Jan-25-20, 11:28
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,478
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkloots
It's not like we're deprived, right?


As I tell aghast co-workers: "The food is delicious and I'm not deprived of health or fashion!"
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 02:56
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
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Plan: Atkins & IF / TRE
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
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I've always been curious of the reasons behind those that start LC and stop. Valuable data to get a hold of. I can guess at some of the reasons. Peer pressure. Social eating situations. Spouse support or the lack of.
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  #15   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 03:14
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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Progress: 139%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s93uv3h
I've always been curious of the reasons behind those that start LC and stop. Valuable data to get a hold of. I can guess at some of the reasons. Peer pressure. Social eating situations. Spouse support or the lack of.


I can now walk through the office break room and ignore it all. When you consider many of my co-workers start their day with bagels and toast, meetings usually have pastry, and we often have pizza Fridays, that's no small thing.

I ignored DH's off-plan food, much of which I don't like But still, if I were to fall off my plan, temptations are all around. Not to mention the drive home, when I'm often hungry and exhausted, have so many bad choices that would take me minutes in the drive-through.

The sheer weight of adding the extra work of shopping and cooking is enough for some who are used to buying meals faster and cheaper than socks.
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