Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 08:43
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 22,655
 
Plan: Keto/IF
Stats: 217/206/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 19%
Location: UK
Default The medications that change who we are

Not low carb per se, but something I feel that there are those of us here who will find this to be of interest:

Quote:
The medications that change who we are

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/...ange-who-we-are

They’ve been linked to road rage, pathological gambling, and complicated acts of fraud. Some make us less neurotic, and others may even shape our social relationships. It turns out many ordinary medications don’t just affect our bodies – they affect our brains. Why? And should there be warnings on packets?


Quote:
“Patient Five” was in his late 50s when a trip to the doctors changed his life.

He had diabetes, and he had signed up for a study to see if taking a “statin” – a kind of cholesterol-lowering drug – might help. So far, so normal.

But soon after he began the treatment, his wife began to notice a sinister transformation. A previously reasonable man, he became explosively angry and – out of nowhere – developed a tendency for road rage. During one memorable episode, he warned his family to keep away, lest he put them in hospital.

Out of fear of what might happen, Patient Five stopped driving. Even as a passenger, his outbursts often forced his wife to abandon their journeys and turn back. Afterwards, she’d leave him alone to watch TV and calm down. She became increasingly fearful for her own safety.
Quote:
Golomb first suspected a connection between statins and personality changes nearly two decades ago, after a series of mysterious discoveries, such as that people with lower cholesterol levels are more likely to die violent deaths. Then one day, she was chatting to a cholesterol expert about the potential link in the hallway at her work, when he brushed it off as obviously nonsense. “And I said ‘how do we know that?’,” she says.

Filled with fresh determination, Golomb scoured the scientific and medical literature for clues. “There was shockingly more evidence than I had imagined,” she says. For one thing, she uncovered findings that if you put primates on a low-cholesterol diet, they become more aggressive.

There was even a potential mechanism: lowering the animals’ cholesterol seemed to affect their levels of serotonin, an important brain chemical thought to be involved in regulating mood and social behaviour in animals. Even fruit flies start fighting if you mess up their serotonin levels, but it also has some unpleasant effects in people – studies have linked it to violence, impulsivity, suicide and murder.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 13:06
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 13,101
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Dr Daniel Amen has a fantastic book on the brain and how it disfunctions. Targetted supplements are remarkable in their effect.

When my son was suicidal, I put him on SAMe and 5HTP. The doctors just sent him home after an evaluation. These days he laughs and jokes and hangs out with his friends.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 18:28
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,515
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

It seems that drug trails, in general, only keep track of physical side effects. As far as I know, drug tests don't include monitoring mental changes.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 18:35
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,478
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

I have two of Dr Amen's books lined up to read soon!
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 21:07
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,448
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: NE WA
Default

Almost 30 years ago I was given an antibiotic (can't, unfortunately, recall the name). I was assured that it was safe for me to take with my nursing baby. But within a week he was crying a lot & I was totally & irrationally paranoid. I had enough sense to link how I was feeling with the medication, so I stopped taking it. Within 48 hours both the baby & I were back to normal.

When I complained to the pharmacist that I hadn't been warned (I always read about the side effects), he said my reaction was extremely rare. Nor did he seem to care. Later I mentioned it to my oral surgeon brother-in-law & he said that reaction not only wasn't rare - he'd had it himself.

When my mother was dying of cancer she was given a pain killer that caused the most horrific hallucinations. We were given no warning at all about that possible side effect.

Those events have made me very suspicious of drugs - even those that do help. I wonder if there are hidden side effects that I won't know about until it's too late.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Tue, Jan-14-20, 21:08
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,448
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: NE WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I have two of Dr Amen's books lined up to read soon!


My mother was a big fan of Dr. Amen. She would be tickled pink to know his books are still being read!
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Wed, Jan-15-20, 05:36
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,478
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
It seems that drug trails, in general, only keep track of physical side effects. As far as I know, drug tests don't include monitoring mental changes.


They also weed out people who have side effects, eliminating them from the trial.

Hidden Side Effects: Medical Studies Often Leave Out Adverse Outcomes --
Quote:
A new analysis estimates that for nearly half of clinical studies, data goes “missing” when published

To determine how widespread the problem was, they analyzed 28 journal articles that together cross-checked the published data from more than 500 clinical studies with their original data sets.

The review's results quantitatively confirm that some drugs may have side effects not even doctors know about—which means treatments may not be as safe as they appear, says Yoon Loke, a physician and lecturer at the University of East Anglia in England.


I shared my astonishment in the War Zone, in the thread Beware of OTC meds because Flonase is now OTC and doesn't even list the side effects on the box like a prescription drug does. It turned out they were considerable, like a permanent loss of smell and taste and early cataracts.

Quote:
If you are a patient and take part in a clinical trial, when you sign the consent form you should be able to stipulate that you want the results of the study to be available to the public. On Alltrials.net, a large body of people are campaigning for all trials to be registered and all results to be reported so there aren't so many missing data

I'm hoping that through the public voice—as well as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently tightening up their regulatory requirements—data about adverse events will become available to a much wider audience.


I don't regard statin risks as "rare," especially since they are so severe. And they are given to women, who have ZERO studies showing benefit. Look at SSRIs like Prozac, which gets handed out like candy, and increases the risk of diabetes. I keep reading studies that claim people only "add ten pounds" but that's not the people I talk to or read about online.

And yet, we are told low carb will kill us.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Wed, Jan-15-20, 06:44
patriciakr's Avatar
patriciakr patriciakr is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,379
 
Plan: CALP with Primal Leanings
Stats: 368/291.2/160 Female 5' 4
BF:toodmnmch
Progress: 37%
Location: In the woods
Default

That was horrifying. I have been adamantly refusing statins, they keep suggesting, I keep explaining the genetic component to my high cholesterol, and showing them my actual cardiac risk ratios are superb.

sigh.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Wed, Jan-15-20, 07:05
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,478
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by patriciakr
That was horrifying. I have been adamantly refusing statins, they keep suggesting, I keep explaining the genetic component to my high cholesterol, and showing them my actual cardiac risk ratios are superb.

sigh.


I just interviewed a new doctor, and when he suggested a cholesterol blood test, I told him, "I don't care." But we will look at the triglycerides.

Keep refusing them. The life you save will likely be your own.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 17:19.


Copyright © 2000-2020 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.