Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 14:55
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,252
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default Lectin-Based Food Poisoning: A New Mechanism of Protein Toxicity

I've been avoiding beans all year as part of my anti-inflammatory diet. But I didn't think one cashew would hurt me. I was wrong.

I was so tickled to find something in the breakroom that I could eat that I grabbed a handful of nuts to go with my coffee. I ate ONE cashew at 9 AM and minutes later I started feeling nauseated. By 11 AM I had to hurry upstairs to get dill pickle spears from the cafeteria. Then I sipped mint green tea all day.

Deviled eggs for lunch went okay, and just now, a steak. And this article explains so much:

Quote:
Lectin-Based Food Poisoning: A New Mechanism of Protein Toxicity

Plant lectins that are not efficiently degraded by digestive enzymes, and that have an affinity for the surface of gut epithelial cells, such as those present in the Leguminosae family, can be poisonous. Acute symptoms following ingestion include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

...

Lectins potently inhibit plasma membrane repair, and hence are toxic to wounded cells. This represents a novel form of protein-based toxicity, one that, we propose, is the basis of plant lectin food poisoning.


Ow. I knew cashews are beans, not nuts, but I'm going to be super careful from now on. Further delving helped me figure out why those frozen cauliflower crust pizzas upset my stomach so very much:

Lectins – Are Your Food and Diet at Risk?

Quote:
What Foods contain the Worst Lectins?
The worst lectins are found in the following foods:

Grains (wheat, quinoa, oats, buckwheat, rye, barley, millet, corn, and possibly rice, although most of the lectins in rice are not in the part that gets eaten)
Legumes (any kind of bean plus peanuts, which have a particularly bad lectin)
Soy


I do not get along with peanuts, and now I know why.

Quote:
Dairy, in particular, is a group of foods that isn’t usually associated with lectins, but the lectins in milk are actually “designed” by nature to cause leaky gut, since infants who are drinking milk actually need to get a mother’s hormones and antibodies directly into their bloodstream in order to develop their immune system (thanks to Sarah (The Paleo Mom) for pointing this out).


Cheese I get along with. I avoid milk.

Cauliflower is low in lectins, yet I can't go near the frozen cauli-crust ones. It's the brown rice flour. Loaded with lectins.

That's okay. I'd rather eat what's good for me.

Just like gluten, the more I'm away from it, the more violent my reaction when I do get exposed.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 16:02
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,422
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: NE WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Ow. I knew cashews are beans, not nuts


Ouch - I didn't. I knew peanuts were off limits for me, and now I know why eating cashews doesn't end well for me. At least I can still eat pecans! Pricey little buggers, but I like them better than walnuts, and I can eat them in moderation.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 16:12
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
Posts: 11,635
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

Me too, I've had really bad reactions with cashews but I didn't know it wasn't a tree nut but a legume.

So the cali-crust pizzas have rice flour in them? I tried it a couple of times last year and it was OK but I can't remember if I had reactions to it.

My inflammation is at 0 and in fact my rings almost fell off yesterday.

I stay away from all sugar free stuff as I react badly to it. It makes my GI really sick, probably inflamed.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 16:44
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,252
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

This is the frozen prefab ones. Even the one slice was bad news! Better off with an omelet.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 21:38
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,478
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

Dr. Steven Gundry's Plant Paradox book focuses on the dangers of and lists a lot of plant lectins and ways to avoid them. Articles on his website around the time his book was being promoted have lots of info on lectins without needing to purchase or read the book. Just be aware he worked many years with Loma Linda University and shares their Adventist views of meat being a negative thing, which doesn't happen to be my own view.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Mon, Dec-16-19, 22:05
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,252
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

I gathered such. I also ran across a lot of whining about soaking the beans and cooking to deactivate them and really it is pathetic.

There's no such precautions needed for meat!
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 06:53
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 494
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 190/179/175 Female 5 feet 5 inches
BF:
Progress: 85%
Default

Werebear - thanks for posting this information on Lectins. I was completely unaware of this issue. Makes a lot of sense - explains a lot.

I have always preferred my vegetables raw - now I have to re-think
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 07:25
tess9132 tess9132 is offline
 
Plan: general lc
Stats: 214/146/130 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 81%
Default

Werebear, I'm not sure if you were the one who posted about lectins a couple of weeks ago, but I have been looking into them ever since. I have never noticed an issue with peanuts or cashews but apparently cashews are supposed to be even worse for us than peanuts. I haven't really been eating non-animal product food lately, but I was considering it because I've been eating cheese, which I know inflames me, and I was thinking if I varied my diet with a little tomato sauce and peanut butter I wouldn't miss the dairy so much.

Very interesting post to me. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 07:34
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 494
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 190/179/175 Female 5 feet 5 inches
BF:
Progress: 85%
Default

The point about rice not having the same reactions as other grains makes a lot of sense since rice is hulled rather than ground like all other grains. And if the lectin is in the outer protective hull of grains, they would contain the lectin in the hull.

What about cream, yogurt and cottage cheese? Do they contain the same amounts of lectin as milk? I guess I will have to look them up.
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 08:32
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,766
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I gathered such. I also ran across a lot of whining about soaking the beans and cooking to deactivate them and really it is pathetic.

There's no such precautions needed for meat!



This cooking method allows my teenagers to eat beans. The many rinses helps, and high temp cooking like commercial canning makes the beans an option.
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 08:41
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,766
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Re dairy, Boborama wrote a story about the effects if European dairy vs American on his wife.

Also, there is a surprizing amount of antibiotics in U.S. dairy products despite rules to prevent this. I dont know if organic milk products are a better option or not.

In the US, milk products are usually supplemented with vitamin D3, so its worth adding supplemental vit D3 if dairy has been eliminated from the diet.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 10:57
tess9132 tess9132 is offline
 
Plan: general lc
Stats: 214/146/130 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 81%
Default

Quote:
In the US, milk products are usually supplemented with vitamin D3, so its worth adding supplemental vit D3 if dairy has been eliminated from the diet.
Lately I have been making yogurt in my instant pot with A2 milk. My asthmatic son, whose breathing does not do well with store bought yogurt, is fine on it. I'm not sure if it's simply that it has less sugar or if the A2 is some sort of magic milk formulation, but I'm not messing with it.
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 11:33
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,766
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

A2 is a type of protein. In the U.S. , the most popular dairy breed has become the Holstein. She is a big effecient producer. She is NOT an A2 producer. It is the old breeds ,that are also smaller, like Jersey, that is A2 dominant. Most of tge European dairy breeds are still the local breeds not tge Holsteins.

Making the milk into yogurt removes much of the lactose. And by starting with fluid milk, it must have D3 added.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 11:47
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
Posts: 11,635
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

As Ariel explained it's a protein in the milk of US breed of cow,
So buy imported cheese too.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Tue, Dec-17-19, 12:03
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,252
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Goat and sheep milk are very tasty. Expensive, but so intense a little goes a long way flavor-wise.

Plus, I seem to get along with dairy. Went without it for years, through a misdiagnosis. Resumed with Atkins and it's been fine since.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 18:29.


Copyright © 2000-2020 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.