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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Dec-06-19, 04:59
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Low Carb/IF
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Default Low-carb diet delivers insulin reductions, smaller fat cells than low-fat diet

Despite similar weight loss, low-carbohydrate diet delivers insulin reductions, smaller fat cells than low-fat diet

https://www.healio.com/endocrinolog...an-low-fat-diet

Quote:
Eating plans low in carbohydrates result in smaller fat cells vs. low-fat/higher-carbohydrate plans after similar weight loss, which may yield better metabolic health, according to a speaker at the World Congress of Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease.

Its pretty clear that when you have a lot of smaller fat cells, your metabolic health is tremendously improved, Tracey McLaughlin, MD, MS, professor of medicine, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism at the Stanford University Medical Center, said during her presentation. As the fat cells get bigger, they predict the development of diabetes.

In a study assessing the effects of weight loss on cardiovascular risk factors among adults with insulin resistance and overweight, but not obesity, McLaughlin and colleagues found that a modest weight loss of roughly 5 kg significantly improved insulin resistance, and that improvement was associated with adipose cell size.

Fat cell size appears to be an even stronger predictor of insulin resistance than obesity per se, McLaughlin said. [In the study], the more weight you lost, the more [insulin action] improved; but the more your fat cell size shrank, the more your insulin action improved.

Diet studies that manipulate the macronutrient content of eating plans demonstrate that weight loss depends on calorie restriction, McLaughlin said. Participants who comply with the plan, whether low carbohydrate or low-fat/higher carbohydrate, experience weight loss. However, weight loss alone may not result in improved insulin resistance.

You can lose weight, but if youre having a lot of carbs and your insulin is sky high, maybe your fat cells arent shrinking as much, McLaughlin said.

In a substudy of the DIETFITS trial, McLaughlin and colleagues obtained fat biopsies from 40 participants at baseline and at 6 months of demonstrated compliance with either a healthy low-fat (n = 21; 20 g fat per day) or healthy low-carbohydrate diet (n = 19; 20 g per day increased by 5 g per day over several weeks). Weight loss and BMI were similar between the groups. At 6 months, the researchers took fat biopsies from participants before a meal tolerance test and 2 hours later, when insulin level peaked.

Insulin levels remained very low, less than 50 U/mL, for the low-carb diet group, whereas the low-fat diet group had higher insulin levels that peaked above 350 U/mL. Circulating fatty acids were higher and lipolysis greater among the low-carb group.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Dec-06-19, 08:19
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teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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Smaller fat cells after similar weight loss. More fat lost vs. lean mass? The other possibility is, an increase in fat cell number--which doesn't seem likely in a deficit. Or there's the question of where the fat was taken from. Probably not visceral, but even different subcutaneous depots might change and have varying effects.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Dec-06-19, 08:22
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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Or a more equitable distribution among existing fat cells--less overstuffed ones, existing smaller cells and preadipocytes taking up the slack. Mature cells less inflamed, immature cells less "starved."
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Dec-06-19, 13:34
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Insulin levels remained very low, less than 50 U/mL, for the low-carb diet group, whereas the low-fat diet group had higher insulin levels that peaked above 350 U/mL. Circulating fatty acids were higher and lipolysis greater among the low-carb group.


Crikey! That seems like a big difference.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Dec-06-19, 13:54
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Quote:
Fat cell size appears to be an even stronger predictor of insulin resistance than obesity per se, McLaughlin said. [In the study], the more weight you lost, the more [insulin action] improved; but the more your fat cell size shrank, the more your insulin action improved.



Nice to see this proven via a study.

Quote:
Insulin levels remained very low, less than 50 U/mL, for the low-carb diet group, whereas the low-fat diet group had higher insulin levels that peaked above 350 U/mL. Circulating fatty acids were higher and lipolysis greater among the low-carb group.


INSULIN is in the driver seat.....

Dr Fung shows much of this info, and the benefits of IF and fasting. He seems to support vlc too.
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