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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Oct-15-19, 11:12
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,389
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default Fat marmosets must move more and eat less!

Fat lab mice, fat marmosets, chimps, dogs, cats... the argument for something(s) in the environment triggering obesity. Everything is getting fat!

Still reading and kind of getting put off by some of the sociological arguments for getting fat. That sure as heck wouldn't apply to non-humans. But chemicals that mess up our (and other animals) endocrine system? Heck yeah.


The obesity era
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Oct-15-19, 12:30
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 12,131
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

I had rotties for years. My favorite dog. Laid back and generally lazy, so tend to get fat. Vets always amazed mine were trim. Fast one day a week, and adjust their food after running a hand along the ribs. Food up, food down.

I have pointers now. Run, run , run. They eat a lot of calories in a day. Beef fat helps fill caloric needs.About a pound a day.

Interestingly rotties are prone to cancer, and pointers are not. While there naybe a genetic compontent, Imho, it is HOW these two breeds use their calories.

My rotties outlived the parent stock , almost doubled the lifespan. Was it the fasting, the fesh veg and fruit, the daily exercise at will......

No reason for our dogs and cats to be overweight. Most are overfed a grain based pet food.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Oct-15-19, 15:08
Little Me's Avatar
Little Me Little Me is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,084
 
Plan: LC/GF
Stats: 208/170/168 Female 5'3
BF:
Progress: 95%
Location: SoCal
Default

We have a lot of rabbits round here. The coyotes are not doing their job keeping the population in check. They eat all day long. They’re skin and bones. FWIW.
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Oct-15-19, 17:19
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 12,131
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Wild Rabbit is never fat. Its one of those animals that if eaten as the sole food for humans, health problems develop due to lack of fat.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Oct-16-19, 06:54
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,107
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Wild rabbit is extremely healthy for the low carber. Wild rabbits need to have some fat to survive. Consuming wild rabbit, I would likely add an additional fat source like butter or pork fat. Delicious.

Wild rabbit nutrition breakdown:

Carbs: 0%
Fats: 19%
Protein: 81%
Estimated Glycemic Load: 0
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Oct-16-19, 09:04
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 12,131
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

This source shows 8%fat.

Quote:
Rabbit meat is very lean; commercial rabbit meat has 50–100 g dissectable fat per 2 kg (live weight). Based on a carcass yield of 60%, rabbit meat is around 8.3% fat while beef and pork are 32% fat and lamb 28%.


from wiki

The one and only time I butchered a meat rabbit, it had no visible fat, very lean even compared to a chicken.

Bottom line, rabbit meat requires added fat to meet the requirements for human survival. Just add a goid quality fat, grassfed butter, or kard, etc.
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Oct-16-19, 12:00
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 13,740
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Ontario
Default

That rabbit--fat has 9 calories per gram, fat-free lean meat works out to more like a calorie per gram (you'll see very lean chicken breast. So you could have meat with 10 percent fat and still have that be half the calories.

This bit from the article;

Quote:
One recent model estimated that eating a mere 30 calories a day more than you use is enough to lead to serious weight gain. Given what each person consumes in a day (1,500 to 2,000 calories in poorer nations; 2,500 to 4,000 in wealthy ones), 30 calories is a trivial amount: by my calculations, that’s just two or three peanut M&Ms. If eliminating that little from the daily diet were enough to prevent weight gain, then people should have no trouble losing a few pounds. Instead, as we know, they find it extremely hard.


One problem here is that 30 calories is outside of the measurement accuracy available to us, most of the time. If I measure out 2000 calories worth of various foods on my electronic food scale, I doubt I'll be anywhere near that accurate. With calorie restriction--whatever might work, we're forced to make changes large enough to be certain that we actually changed something. Sort of the same problem with weighing ourselves, if it turned out the best way to lose weight was an ounce a week, we'd be out of luck, we could never be certain anything was happening. So--it's actually very hard to know that you've eliminated the equivalent of two or three M&Ms. Of course if you do manage to, calorie requirements go down as you lose weight, so you don't get to goal that way anyways. A 30 calorie a day surplus might get people fatter, but they'd have to increase, account for their increased metabolic rate as they get bigger, or they'll just reach an equilibrium where they're burning off the extra 30 calories. I think more likely--people will be eating a greater surplus. Maybe they go to college and start cooking for themselves, maybe shifting from puberty to young adult hood changes something--more likely than a prolonged slight surplus is something like say an extra 3 or 4 hundred calories a day, and the metabolism eventually catches up to that. Or maybe that scenario just seems more believable to me because at least it's within measurement accuracy, sort of an observability fallacy.
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Oct-16-19, 14:47
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,457
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

Gary Taubes covered it pretty well in one of his books. Can't recall if it was GCBC or Why We Get Fat or both? On how CICO is an absurd way of trying to explain weight gain. Supports what Teaser said.
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  #9   ^
Old Thu, Oct-17-19, 11:44
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 2,366
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: NE WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
The one and only time I butchered a meat rabbit, it had no visible fat, very lean even compared to a chicken.

Bottom line, rabbit meat requires added fat to meet the requirements for human survival. Just add a good quality fat, grassfed butter, or lard, etc.


We raise rabbits & they all do have fat, but I'm one of those people who don't like the taste of it so it goes to the chickens. I often cook rabbit with butter or olive oil, but I don't think lean meats need to have fat eaten with them to be healthful. If enough fat is eaten during the day, one can have a good tasting lean meat. And rabbit is one of those rare lean meats that actually taste good, unlike store-bought pork or many cuts of beef.

The best part of raising our own rabbits is getting the organs. I eat the kidneys & heart, husband & I fight over the liver - it is SO good!
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Oct-17-19, 12:15
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,107
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS

The best part of raising our own rabbits is getting the organs. I eat the kidneys & heart, husband & I fight over the liver - it is SO good!

That's a treat.
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  #11   ^
Old Tue, Oct-22-19, 10:42
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,389
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

I'd love to feed my kitty with IBD rabbit, but at $20 a pound it just isn't affordable.
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