Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sat, Sep-28-19, 03:46
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
Posts: 1,262
 
Plan: Atkins & IF / TRE
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 97%
Default Gut Bacteria and Their Role in Depression 8-6-19 - Dr. David Perlmutter

Gut Bacteria and Their Role in Depression 8-6-19

December of 2019 marks the publication of a new medical textbook, The Microbiome and the Brain (CRC Press). The text features chapters focused on a number of important topics, among them the role of gut bacteria in a variety of medical conditions including autism, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimerís disease. The common theme throughout the book, as one would surmise from the title, is the relationship between the gut and brain health. The chapters have been written by some of the most well respected researchers and clinicians from around the world, and I am honored to be the editor-in-chief of this important contribution.

One area in which the relationship between the gut and the brain that seems to be getting a lot of attention as of late focuses on how variations in the gut bacteria may ultimately contribute to alterations in mood. Specifically, there is currently a fairly in-depth pursuit to understand the relationship between nuances of bacterial constituents and depression.

In a recent study published in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers in Belgium surveyed the gut microbiome in 1,054 individuals and set about correlating their findings with measurements of both quality of life indicators as well as depression status in the participants.

The correlations revealed by the study are quite interesting. The researchers found, for example, that those with lower levels of a specific organism, Bacteriodes enterotype 2, displayed lower measurements of quality of life as well as higher prevalence of depression. Higher quality of life indicators were consistently correlated with higher levels of two types of organisms, Faecalibacterium and Coprococcus. Interestingly, these are organisms that are known to produce the short chain fatty acid butyrate and are known to be associated with reduced inflammation as well.

The researchers then went further and evaluated the genetics that underlie how specific organisms manufacture neurochemicals which are suspected of playing a role in regulating mood in humans. Their results were fascinating. Correlations between these pathways, including those involved in the neurotransmitters dopamine and GABA, were described.

While we donít yet have the ability to draw conclusions regarding the role of specific bacteria in regulating mood, these findings indicate that we are at least on the right trail. One important takeaway is the relationship between lower levels of bacteria that reduce inflammation and depression, as we now recognize that depression is fundamentally an inflammatory disorder.

What is actionable in all of this is that our food choices are highly influential in modulating the complexion of our gut bacteria and, as such, offer us a tool that may have important implications as it relates to conditions like depression. You can learn more about the specifics of food and depression in another blog post on our site from Austin Perlmutter, MD.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Mon, Oct-07-19, 19:42
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,874
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

How did I miss this???

With an ADD child that has had some level of depression until recently, I m eager to understand support options that change the playing field for him.

His opportunities in life have been deminushed due to these issues.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Mon, Oct-07-19, 19:56
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,874
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Did u look at the last link. It has a comprehensive list of foods based on an antiDepression factor. The animal proteins are clearly organ meat, bivalves, and fish. Yet the big guns are the vegetab
les: watercress,spinach , chard, lettuces, mustard greens, beet greens , parsley.

Perhaps that is the key I have been seeking. My son has been up beat and happy which is great, but could not ID the reason for this change.
Perhaps it is the garden greens this summer. Filled with mustard greens, turnip greens, parsley along with kale, etc.

And he is always asking for octopus...

Thrilled!!!!
I have a list to work with.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 18:40.


Copyright © 2000-2019 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.