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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 05:41
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,191
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default CDC Obesity Prevalence Maps

The CDC released its Obesity Prevalence data this week. Whenever I'm inspired by all the amazing success stories here and in the Keto/LC world, data like this brings me back to reality. Nine states now report over 35% of residents are Obese, up from none in 2011. There was no slow-down in obesity rates 2017-2018, at all, in fact, two more states were added in one year. I first saw the prevalence maps in Dr. Eenfeldt's 2011 AHS talk, and at the bottom of this linked page, the new animated maps illustrate in what has happened since. Looking at the data since 1985, it is a non-stop train wreck. https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html

New states over 35%; Kentucky, ND, and Missouri. A few states went down to 30-35% obesity, but that is nothing to brag about. 2011-2018 https://www.cdc.gov/.../2018-overall-obesity-prevalence... The stats before 2011 when the method of calculation changed, are also linked in this article.
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 07:32
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,072
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Sobering, and while we're able to prevent hunger in many areas in this day and age, it's not supposed to be like this. Malnutrition is occurring whether one eats or not.
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 09:10
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,874
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

You nailed it, Rob.

The grassroots efforts are spreading the word and gaining traction, but until the US government changes its stance clearly this sickening trend will continue. Medical professionals, with a few rare exceptions, follow the plate method and the calorie is a calorie theory which are both badly flawed.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 10:00
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 846
 
Plan: Protein Power, IF
Stats: 238/204/145 Female 5'8"
BF:53.75%/46.6%/25%
Progress: 37%
Location: PNW
Default

And it's worse than those statistics show, probably. Those are all self-reported numbers from people who take voluntarily take part in telephone surveys. Telephone surveys are notorious for missing large groups of people and it's gotten dramatically worse in the last 10 years when so many people have given up land lines and have their cell #s taken off the lists for marketing phone calls.

This means that surveys like this are unintentionally skewed towards the middle and upper classes and older people. Obesity is often considered a disease of the poor and if they aren't fully represented in those numbers, then it's worse than we think.
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 11:34
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
Posts: 1,262
 
Plan: Atkins & IF / TRE
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 97%
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Totally reversible.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 14:49
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,874
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

CG, the group you specified shows a far higher percent of obesity in my personal experience ..... you are spot on.

And yes, s9, totally reversable.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 17:37
JessAus's Avatar
JessAus JessAus is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 486
 
Plan: Primal/IF
Stats: 220/172/176 Female 5'10"
BF:~40%/27.7%/29%
Progress: 109%
Location: Western Australia
Default

We have the similar stats in Aus - We went from 18% of the population being obese to 30% in the span of 15 years!

When I was a child it was really rare to see someone overweight on the streets, now I would say more are overweight than not. The government really needs to do more to stop this epidemic.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Sep-15-19, 20:01
jschwab jschwab is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,069
 
Plan: Atkins72/Paleo/NoGrain/IF
Stats: 285/227/200 Female 5 feet 5.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 68%
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I wonder how much of it is the population is aging?
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Sep-16-19, 09:51
Little Me's Avatar
Little Me Little Me is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,036
 
Plan: LC/GF
Stats: 208/171/168 Female 5'3
BF:
Progress: 93%
Location: SoCal
Default

In Oregon, where I’m traveling at the moment, I can tell you that obesity is far more prevalent than the map would have you believe. Many/most young people are very obese here. The little ones are “good eaters” too.
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Sep-16-19, 12:11
fred42 fred42 is offline
New Member
Posts: 14
 
Plan: Ketogenic
Stats: 260/220/220 Male 6' 4"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Charlotte, NC
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I had a glimmer of hope that the CDC would be more scientific than the USDA, but as I followed the various links on the CDC page to see what could be done about obesity or diabetes it was the same old stuff. Whole grains, fruits and vegetables, seed oils, lean meats.
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Sep-16-19, 16:04
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,444
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CityGirl8
And it's worse than those statistics show, probably. Those are all self-reported numbers from people who take voluntarily take part in telephone surveys. Telephone surveys are notorious for missing large groups of people and it's gotten dramatically worse in the last 10 years when so many people have given up land lines and have their cell #s taken off the lists for marketing phone calls.

This means that surveys like this are unintentionally skewed towards the middle and upper classes and older people. Obesity is often considered a disease of the poor and if they aren't fully represented in those numbers, then it's worse than we think.

First thing that jumps out to me, not at all a surprise, is that it tends to be worse where income and education are low (resulting in reduced income). As Gary Taubes said someplace, refined carbohydrates are the cheapest of foods. Like, bread, beans and oatmeal are a whole lot easier on the food budget than meat and eggs of any quality. I remember as a kid hearing my mom talk about a friend of hers who was saying she was on a "rich man's diet" to lose weight because she was eating stuff like meat rather than mac n cheese and more budget (but not health) friendly foods. Makes it harder when major public sources of "health" advice claim the low-fat carbs rather than meat, for instance, is the healthier choice. I've learned from personal experience otherwise.
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Sep-16-19, 18:31
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
Posts: 11,027
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

Articles are written about "Food deserts" in big cities with no grocery stores in certain areas, but nobody writes about food deserts in rural areas with no grocery stores and maybe a convenience store that might be miles away....
Access to food in the rural/country is huge.

A little rural store in the country might have a few cans of spagetti-Os, chips, cookies, soda, processed pkg sandwich meat, maybe bread, maybe milk and no fresh meats or veggies.
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Sep-16-19, 18:37
jschwab jschwab is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,069
 
Plan: Atkins72/Paleo/NoGrain/IF
Stats: 285/227/200 Female 5 feet 5.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 68%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Articles are written about "Food deserts" in big cities with no grocery stores in certain areas, but nobody writes about food deserts in rural areas with no grocery stores and maybe a convenience store that might be miles away....
Access to food in the rural/country is huge.

A little rural store in the country might have a few cans of spagetti-Os, chips, cookies, soda, processed pkg sandwich meat, maybe bread, maybe milk and no fresh meats or veggies.


Yes, this is totally true. Analysts and policymakers don't see rural people, period. I used to work on an advocacy issue that was largely understood for years to primarily impact urban youth. We did the actual research and got the paradigm of the work shifted to a focus on rural youth in our agency. Urban issues are sexy and fun for people who work in think tanks and advocacy organizations. But it's not really where the worst poverty and societal collapse is happening.
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