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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 01:05
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default How cutting out sugar affects your body

Quote:
From the Daily Mail
London, UK
18 July, 2019

How cutting out sugar affects your body: Dietitian explains sweet foods cause drug-like addiction and quitting could give you healthier skin and boost your performance in the gym and at work
  • Dr Samantha Coogan said giving up sugar causes withdrawal symptoms
  • But once the body adjusts, it will feel more energised and productive
  • Dr Coogan said this effect was similar to that of quitting alcohol or drugs

A dietitian has revealed how cutting out sugar, which can cause a drug-like addiction, could boost your health and performance in the gym and at work.

Dr Samantha Coogan, president of the Nevada Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a researcher at the University of Nevada, explains the effects of quitting the sweet stuff.

Withdrawal symptoms, including headaches, stomach aches or bowel changes, can last for days or even weeks.

But once the body has adjusted, you can expect to see a boost in brain function at work and you'll need fewer sick days at work, Dr Coogan said.

The body will feel less lethargic, making exercise easier and muscles will be replenished quicker with adequate nutrition.

Dr Coogan said the hair, skin, and nails improve, while sleep is more restful and weight loss is 'inevitable' from cutting out the high-calorie snacks.
Your body will also be better protected against disease – too much sugar is known to raise the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

Dr Coogan, writing for the University of Nevada, said: 'It may be a harsh comparison, but think about how drug addicts live on a day-to-day basis.
'Work is either low quality or non-existent; workouts are either minimal intensity, or again non-existent; and their sleep patterns are constantly disturbed without ever feeling fully rested.

'Sugar is an addictive substance for some people, so it really is necessary to approach it in a similar manner to drug or alcohol detoxification.'

The higher a person's sugar tolerance is, the longer it may take for them to get used to a diet that doesn't involve reaching for sugary snacks.

But once the withdrawal phase is over, Dr Coogan said the benefits can be numerous.

People may find their hair, skin and nails look healthier, their belly fat decreases, productivity at work and performance in the gym improve, and they sleep better, Dr Coogan said.

Boost productivity at work

The brain needs sugar as an energy source to function but, like in any part of the body, excess amounts of it can be harmful.

Neurologists have found that thinking, learning and concentration are all affected by how efficiently the brain can use the sugar in the body.

Diets high in refined carbohydrates and sugar – such as cakes, chocolate, fizzy drinks and biscuits – have also been linked to cognitive decline in later life, such as memory problems and dementia.

A study by Korean researchers of 317 healthy children found that those who consumed more processed foods, rather than a healthy diet, had reduced cognitive capacity, including poorer short-term and working memory, both needed to concentrate. It was published in the Journal of Lifestyle and Medicine in 2017.

Hyperglycemia is a common complication of diabetes caused by high glucose levels in the blood.

And a study published in Diabetes Care found that people with type 2 diabetes reported increased feelings of sadness and anxiety during acute hyperglycemia.

In study of 23,245 people, the University College London, found adverse effect of sugar intake from sugary foods and drinks on long-term psychological health, including depression. It was published in the journal Scientific Reports in 2017.

Improve gym workouts

Dr Coogan said: 'Sugar often makes us feel lethargic, fatigued and begging for more, which also takes a toll on the body.

'Some people may feel the positive effects of a sugar-free diet right away, while others may take a little longer.'

Cutting out sugar could make your body feel better because it has to be replaced with other – hopefully more nutritious – foods.

Exercising uses a lot of energy taken from glycogen stores, and it's important to eat nutritious food to both fuel the workout and recover from it.

A post-workout meal high in carbohydrates, as well as protein, is required to refill muscle energy stores enough to promote a substantial insulin release which will carry the nutrients back into the muscle, accelerating muscle repair.

Inadequate food choices can result in fatigue, reduced performance the next training session and muscle soreness.

Poor nutrition, such as high sugar foods and drinks, also may impact the 'end goal' of a person's gym routine because it contributes to fat storing.
When sugars are broken down during digestion to be used for fuel, some is stored in the muscles and liver to be used later.

But if there is excess sugar, which is not used for energy in activity, it needs to be stored somewhere – and for this the body uses fat cells.

Dr Coogan said: 'Replacing sugar with things like fiber and protein will increase your satiety values, allowing you to feel fuller for longer while reducing your overall caloric intake.'

Not all sugar is bad, however. A 2018 study by Appalachian State University compared the effects of eating a banana - made of carbohydrate which is broken down into sugar - versus drinking sugar water after intense exercise.

Both helped restore energy levels, but those who ate a banana had better overall recovery and less inflammation due the natural nutrients and it's benefits for the muscles.

Skin and hair improves

Dr Coogan added that people may notice their hair, skin and nails start to improve when they've cut out sugar.

Past research has shown that diets high in sugar can damage collagen, the protein that makes the skin youthful.

When sugar enters the body, it triggers a process called glycation, creating a substance which can accelerate the effects of aging, such as wrinkles and sagging skin by degrading collagen and elastin - which both keep the skin firm.

The body's way of dealing with a surge of sugar is to produce insulin. When insulin spikes, so does inflammation, which is linked to inflammatory skin conditions including psoriasis and eczema.

It can also exacerbate acne, as insulin can lead to the production of hormones which boost sebum cell growth - resulting in spots.

A study of 2,300 people by Turkish Researchers in 2012 found that people who frequently consumed added sugars had a 30 times greater risk of developing acne.

Dr Coogan said some people may start to see changes in their body within just a few days, while others might have to wait longer.

'Fruit may start to taste sweet again — almost like candy — because your taste receptors have been given a chance to relax and stop searching for that sugar,' she added.

'Your sweetness tolerance starts to reduce in only a few days as well.
'The higher your sugar tolerance was, the longer it may take for naturally sweetened foods to taste as sweet as before.

'You may even find that certain foods are almost too sweet for your new preference.

Again, every person and body is different. Many factors — such as genetics, presence of or risk factors for certain chronic diseases and conditions, physical activity level, carb/sugar sensitivity, age, gender — may play a role in how, and how long, your body reacts to the removal of sugar.



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/...-addiction.html
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 03:54
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Default

Good enough to get people thinking seriously about how sugar affects their health.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 05:47
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Default

When I started in 2003, describing my diet as "cutting out wheat and sugar" was met with more horror, I can say that for certain. In fact, now most people nod sagely.

They're not going to do it, but they know that's the right way to lose weight, I think.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 07:41
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
When I started in 2003, describing my diet as "cutting out wheat and sugar" was met with more horror, I can say that for certain. In fact, now most people nod sagely.

They're not going to do it, but they know that's the right way to lose weight, I think.

I'm noticing the same attitudes as the word is now out about sugar and the havoc it can wreak on health. This is a good trend.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 09:25
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is online now
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Plan: Protein Power, IF
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Default

There's definitely been a shift towards acknowledging sugar isn't healthy, but people still don't really understand it. Most people think you're saying you cut out all the dessert and sugar-y sodas you must have been constantly stuffing your face with, because of course you must have been if you're so fat. They think "Yep, that's a good way to cut calories."

It's a good trend to see articles like really emphasize the other effects that sugar can have on your health. I hope it starts to make a difference in prepared food so there's less added sugar in things that doesn't need it at all, like salad dressing, pasta sauce, etc. And that it's not just replaced with other sweeteners, like honey, maple syrup, etc.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Jul-19-19, 20:12
Zei Zei is offline
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Default

A decent article on this subject.
Quote:
Exercising uses a lot of energy taken from glycogen stores, and it's important to eat nutritious food to both fuel the workout and recover from it.

A post-workout meal high in carbohydrates, as well as protein, is required to refill muscle energy stores enough to promote a substantial insulin release which will carry the nutrients back into the muscle, accelerating muscle repair.

In my case and probably many others here, being very low carb and fat adapted, the post-workout carbohydrates to refill muscle glycogen stores are no longer needed, as my body manufactures just the right amount of its own carbs through gluconeogenesis for its needs. I have heard others of my skill level at the pickleball gym comment on my having endurance/energy to keep playing without needing to stop and rest between games like them, and I don't need to eat anything to do so, just have continuous stable energy from internal fat-burning. I think this is all related to being fully fat-adapted.
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Jul-20-19, 06:20
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
I have heard others of my skill level at the pickleball gym comment on my having endurance/energy to keep playing without needing to stop and rest between games like them, and I don't need to eat anything to do so, just have continuous stable energy from internal fat-burning. I think this is all related to being fully fat-adapted.


It is literally running on different fuel. Which means we can compare performance!

Perhaps it's because I live in an area with four dramatically different seasons, but I have been working towards harmony with the shifting cycles. This means letting my carbs drift up during spring to peak in fall, then go down to near zero through winter. With spring I start by adding in greens.

Just to be clear, by "drift up" I mean adding 10-20, not going anywhere near SAD levels. It's berries, tomatoes, and avocado being added in this summer.

It makes sense to me that people living in this climate zone would have to adjust their food intake this way, and I can say it is working so far. If we look at a high carb diet switching the body into food storage mode, which is supposed to be a hibernation kind of strategy in the fall only, the way my body behaves finally makes sense to me.
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Jul-23-19, 22:26
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mike_d mike_d is offline
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Plan: PSMF/IF
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
A decent article on this subject.

In my case and probably many others here, being very low carb and fat adapted, the post-workout carbohydrates to refill muscle glycogen stores are no longer needed, as my body manufactures just the right amount of its own carbs through gluconeogenesis for its needs. I have heard others of my skill level at the pickleball gym comment on my having endurance/energy to keep playing without needing to stop and rest between games like them, and I don't need to eat anything to do so, just have continuous stable energy from internal fat-burning. I think this is all related to being fully fat-adapted.
I noticed the same thing when I was younger and had access to the coast for windsurfing. If I had water I could go all day long without coming back to shore like everyone else to eat sandwiches or snacks. No one ever asked how I could do it. One time I broke a mast and didn't make it back to shore till Sunset. Had a long hike back to my truck carrying my gear, but still I wasn't exhausted!
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Jul-24-19, 05:30
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Default

I cut out sugar, first. As I realized I still had occasional symptoms, after a couple of years, then I went gluten-free. It was a low carb wrap, too. I knew it wasn’t the carbs.

So I had a front row seat to the difference.

Dropping sugar lost me a particular craving: that thing where I would wander around the kitchen until, desperate to escape, I would cram junk food into my mouth. Like an evil spell, I would be allowed to concentrate on something for a WHOLE TEN MINUTES before being driven into the kitchen again.

Dropping wheat lost me a different set of symptoms which I felt with my body, more than my mood. Bloating I didn’t know I was dealing with vanished. Likewise, I didn’t know my entire digestive system was complaining until it stopped. And this was when my arthritic hands dropped back down to arthritic thumbs; only and occasionally.

I now honestly see sugar and wheat as drugs. Which, they are.
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Jul-24-19, 08:40
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I now honestly see sugar and wheat as drugs. Which, they are.

I do as well.
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