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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 12:44
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
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Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
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Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default The sugar in fruit doesn’t make it bad for you, despite some trendy diet claims

Where do nutritionists get these wacky ideas?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/life...2693_story.html
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 12:55
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
Where do nutritionists get these wacky ideas?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/life...2693_story.html


Good question. I have a friend who said she's gone low carb and cut out all sugar, then proceeds to tell me about the highly nutritious honey she's just bought!
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 13:06
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,779
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Can't get past a subscription commitment to the Washington Post to sign in to read this article. It would have been interesting . . .
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 16:57
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,365
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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Some quotes from the article.

"It’s true that whole fruit contains sugar, but it is natural sugar. The sugar we would be wise to limit is added sugar, found in regular soda and many highly processed foods. When you eat an apple, a pear, a peach or some berries, their sugar comes wrapped in a fiber-rich, water-rich, nutrient-rich package. That fiber slows the release of fruit’s natural sugar into your bloodstream, preventing a sugar spike, especially if you eat your fruit as part of a meal or snack that contains protein and healthy fats."

'What about juice? Juice has been vilified (likened to soda but with more nutrients) or glorified (consumed freely because of those nutrients). Although drinking juice every time we’re thirsty isn’t a good idea, 100 percent fruit juice in moderation — an 8-ounce glass per day — adds nutritional value to the diet without adding excessive sugar. Orange juice, in particular, does not appear to affect blood sugar, possibly because of the soluble fiber and pectin that makes it into the glass, as well as the phytochemical hesperidin."
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 17:29
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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I remember my mother having this "special" set of orange juice glasses with a matching pitcher. They were clear glass with painted oranges on them.
The juice glasses were 4 ounces each which was probably the juice of 2 oranges.
So, to have an 8 ounce glass would use 4 oranges.


Back then to have orange juice you had to actually juice a fresh orange.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 19:30
Zei Zei is offline
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If orange juice doesn't affect blood sugar, how come it's the traditional go-to for type 1 diabetics experiencing dangerous hypoglycemia, huh, huh? With gestational diabetes back before I knew much about carbs the dietitian said NO ORANGE JUICE. I didn't buy the idea (it's healthy fruit, right?) until she showed us how much sugar it contained. I was convinced. Sad truth for fruit's aura of healthiness, sugar is sugar to the body. It may not get absorbed as quickly as a Coke, but it will be. It gets called nature's candy for a reason.
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 19:39
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Yup. When my bg was 40, the nurses RAN for orange juice.

This was post c- section by 6 hours. 50 units insulin at bedtime the night before, no breakfast as i was on a very cold table with a spinal, and by noontime my body was trying to slip into a coma. I figured out the problem.... not the nurses. OJ was instant fix.
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Apr-16-19, 19:47
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Thanks, Mike. This is the old belief that fruit at any time of the year is healthy, and "natural" sugar is harmless when consumed with the healthy micronutrients riding along with the fruit. What many naive people don't understand is that fruit when consumed occasionally and during the traditional season when it's ready for harvest is not unhealthy unless consumed in mass quantity. When consumed for 12 months of the year, all bets are off and the value of the micronutrients along for the ride is inconsequential when compared to the damage fructose (the "natural" sugar referenced) can wreak. Also, consider the fact that today's fruit has been developed to have a higher sugar content. Fruit juice? Just crack open a can of coke for an equivalent:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/he...-Coca-Cola.html

The Telegraph article is an eye opener.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 01:38
RonnieScot RonnieScot is offline
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Plan: LCHF, no breakfast.
Stats: 256/145/140 Female 5ft 3"
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For a non diabetic, I think an apple or two or similar a day is probably fine. Although I have no science to back this up!

I think as soon as we’re talking fruit juice, smoothies, or bowls of sliced melon and mango, these are different conversations.
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 02:49
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doreen T doreen T is offline
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Plan: DANDR '92
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I think avocados, olives and bell peppers/capsicums are wonderful fruits. I eat them often
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 05:30
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
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I think it was Dr. Steven Gundry who said this, the concept that the fructose in fruit during summer months is there to help the plant spread its seed babies with a bit of fertilizer and help you fatten to survive the long hard winter. The bears in Montana eat massive quantities of huckleberries during summer to put on the fat for winter's hibernation, for instance. Fruit, yes bred now to have much more sugar, year around? Gundry recommends eating fruits only in their particular natural season of availability for that reason even if the fruit has been made to be available in the stores the entire year. And also recommends avoiding if you have metabolic issues.
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 05:47
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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I'm following seasonal paleo: I had this winter as very low carb and no vegetables, started spring with spring greens and that seems to go okay, and will see how fruit fits in as summer comes on.

Don't know where avocado fits in, so I just have it when I want some.
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  #13   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 10:52
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is offline
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Plan: Protein Power, IF
Stats: 238/214/145 Female 5'9"
BF:53.75%/48.7%/25%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
If orange juice doesn't affect blood sugar, how come it's the traditional go-to for type 1 diabetics experiencing dangerous hypoglycemia, huh, huh? With gestational diabetes back before I knew much about carbs the dietitian said NO ORANGE JUICE.
This is exactly what I was thinking! I had a grandfather and an aunt who were both T1 diabetics and whenever they would visit we would make sure to have some frozen orange juice concentrate on hand. And it was made clear to us kids that we were not to drink it, that it was for emergencies only in case someone had a blood sugar crisis.
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  #14   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 12:44
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Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Keto/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Can't get past a subscription commitment to the Washington Post to sign in to read this article. It would have been interesting . . .



Here you go...

Quote:
The sugar in fruit doesn’t make it bad for you, despite some trendy diet claims

In recent months, my dietitian colleagues and I have been encountering more and more people making claims like “fruit is bad for you” or “fruit is toxic.” “What is going ON?” one of them posted on a dietitian Internet mailing list. What’s going on is that the current crop of fad diets, such as paleo, keto, carnivore and pegan — have convinced a lot of people that fruit is a dietary no-no.

There was a time when we didn’t question whether fruit was good for us, when we more or less took “eat your fruits and veggies” to heart. Today, many people are worried that fruit is too high in carbs, sugar and calories. One of my patients wouldn’t eat any fruit other than blueberries because she had bought into the myth — again, promoted by fad diets — that blueberries are the only “safe” fruit to eat because they are “low glycemic” (in other words, they don’t cause your blood sugar to spike). Here’s the kicker: She didn’t even like blueberries.

Berries are the only fruit allowed on the pegan diet, the subtext being that other fruit is a ticket to high blood sugar; but this is a fairly liberal stance compared with other fad diets du jour. For example, many followers of the keto diet and the trending carnivore diet (a.k.a. the “zero carb” diet) call fruit toxic because of its sugar. Now, that’s what I consider disordered eating.

It’s true that whole fruit contains sugar, but it is natural sugar. The sugar we would be wise to limit is added sugar, found in regular soda and many highly processed foods. When you eat an apple, a pear, a peach or some berries, their sugar comes wrapped in a fiber-rich, water-rich, nutrient-rich package. That fiber slows the release of fruit’s natural sugar into your bloodstream, preventing a sugar spike, especially if you eat your fruit as part of a meal or snack that contains protein and healthy fats.

Ditching fruit may mean missing out on some key nutrients. Many fruits are rich not just in vitamins and minerals, but also in phytochemicals, natural plant-based compounds that appear to have a variety of health benefits, including helping to prevent cancer and promote cardiovascular health. Pigment-rich berries and cherries are especially good sources of phytochemicals, but apples, oranges and other fruits contain phytochemicals, too.

Some of my older patients have adopted the blueberries-only rule because of preliminary research on the MIND diet — a hybrid of the Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet. This research found an association between eating blueberries and a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease — likely because blueberries are rich in a type of phytochemical called anthocyanins. Other fruit was found to be “neutral,” meaning it appeared to neither increase nor decrease risk of Alzheimer’s — but somehow, the information has been twisted to make patients think they should avoid all fruit except berries.

This is unfortunate, because even if ongoing clinical research confirms that non-berry fruit doesn’t help prevent Alzheimer’s, such fruit may still help prevent other chronic diseases we would all like to avoid. A study published in the March issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, for example, found that moderate fruit intake was associated with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, several cancers and other chronic health conditions.

What about juice? Juice has been vilified (likened to soda but with more nutrients) or glorified (consumed freely because of those nutrients). Although drinking juice every time we’re thirsty isn’t a good idea, 100 percent fruit juice in moderation — an 8-ounce glass per day — adds nutritional value to the diet without adding excessive sugar. Orange juice, in particular, does not appear to affect blood sugar, possibly because of the soluble fiber and pectin that makes it into the glass, as well as the phytochemical hesperidin.

Fears about pesticide residues on fruit also have made some people wary about eating nonorganic fruit, even though organic agriculture does use approved pesticides, and traces of nonapproved pesticides are regularly found on organic produce. Fears about pesticides tend to get stirred up each year when the Environmental Working Group releases its “Dirty Dozen” list of “most contaminated” fruits and vegetables. However, the EWG’s methods have come under fire, and it’s important to remember that even if a specific type of produce has “more” pesticide residue than another type, that residue could be well within levels determined to be safe.

Frankly, fruit doesn’t deserve the bad reputation it’s developing; it is the healthiest sweet around. We naturally like the taste of it, because we are born with an affinity for sweetness. So, how much fruit should you eat? That depends on your age, gender and level of physical activity. Two cups per day is the U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommendation for men and younger women; the recommendation drops to 1½ cups for women older than 30. If you get more than 30 minutes per day of moderate-intensity exercise, you may choose to include more.

The bottom line is that fruit — especially when in season — adds pleasure, nutrition and variety to our meals. So go beyond plopping some berries in your cereal or yogurt: Have an orange with your scrambled eggs, an apple with your almonds, a juicy peach for dessert. You’ll be happier — and healthier.

Carrie Dennett is a registered dietitian nutritionist and owner of Nutrition by Carrie.
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  #15   ^
Old Wed, Apr-17-19, 13:35
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Thank you, Demi!
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