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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Oct-15-18, 04:47
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
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Default Full-fat cheese can CUT your cholesterol

Quote:
Full-fat cheese can CUT your cholesterol

Incredibly, eating half a 250g block of full-fat cheese a day lowers “bad” cholesterol to a level lower than if you were to eat low-fat cheese

Dr Miriam Stoppard


Cheese contains lots of calories, right? So you shouldn’t eat too much of it, right?

Wrong.

Would you believe eating half a 250g block of full-fat cheese a day lowers a person’s “bad” cholesterol to a level lower than if you eat low-fat cheese?

Unlike other forms of dairy, cheese contains a membrane around its fatty acid droplets, which may contribute to cholesterol-lowering effects.

These findings in a new study fly in the face of the old idea that cheeses such as cheddar and Stilton are bad because they are high in saturated fat and raise the risk of heart attacks.

Frankly, I’m surprised by the news that full-fat cheese can lower ~cholesterol more than other kinds of dairy, such as butter.

This is due, researchers say, to the way its components, such as calcium and milk proteins, are arranged in the cheese mix.

Lead author Dr Emma Feeney, from University College Dublin, advises us to stop thinking about foods in terms of their saturated fat content, and although she doesn’t recommend people eat a 120g portion of cheese every day, she adds it’s not going to do you any harm.

The researchers studied 164 ~overweight volunteers aged 50 and older – 46 of the participants ate 120g of full-fat Irish cheese every day for six weeks, while 45 consumed a reduced-fat Irish cheddar and 21g of butter.

All participants were told to limit their milk intake to 56g a day.

Findings show there was no change in body weight or insulin levels between the study’s participants.

There was also no change in the fasting blood sugar levels in their bodies first thing in the morning before they’d eaten, meaning they were unlikely to develop diabetes.

The researchers believe that cheese should be eaten as a whole food rather than being cut out of a reduced-
fat diet.

And eating full-fat dairy actually reduces a person’s risk of dying from a stroke by 42%, says another study.

The lead author Dr Marcia Otto, from the University of Texas, said: “Our ~findings not only support, but also significantly strengthen, the growing body of evidence which suggests that dairy fat, contrary to popular belief, does not increase risk of heart disease or overall mortality in older adults.

“In addition to not contributing to death, the results suggest that one fatty acid present in dairy may lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, particularly from stroke.”

The take-home message from all this is saturated fats in cheese don’t increase the risk of heart disease. That will be great news to a lot of you.





https://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/...ll-fat-13415785
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Oct-15-18, 07:44
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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ROFL.

I don't eat rubbber, lol.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Oct-15-18, 08:07
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HappyLC HappyLC is offline
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Well this is good news for my daughter. She practically lives on Kerrygold Dubliner cheese, lol. We buy it by the brick at Costco.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Oct-15-18, 11:23
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Mmmmm. Cheese. This is actually sad and funny.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Oct-15-18, 21:54
Zei Zei is offline
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Default

This membrane thing, what about cream I wonder? I know there's something that breaks down or changes somehow when it's churned into butter. Or would the effects only be seen with cheese because of its protein content plus fat?
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Oct-16-18, 15:42
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Squarecube Squarecube is offline
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Default



Quote:
The researchers studied 164 ~overweight volunteers aged 50 and older – 46 of the participants ate 120g of full-fat Irish cheese every day for six weeks, while 45 consumed a reduced-fat Irish cheddar and 21g of butter.



Does anybody know why they added the 21 g of butter to the low fat group?
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Oct-16-18, 19:39
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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Default

I'm assuming that the butter is to make up for the calories lost in the low-fat cheese.
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Oct-17-18, 16:52
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Squarecube Squarecube is offline
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Fine, 'cept isn't butterfat what's missing from low fat cheese?
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Oct-17-18, 22:43
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teaser teaser is offline
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Default

It isn't clear to me that the fat in the cheese "lowers" cholesterol so much as doesn't raise it, compared to "butter plus low fat cheese." Or that low fat cheese plus olive oil or just low fat cheese without the added butter wouldn't have resulted in a lower cholesterol. Or that I need to lower my cholesterol anyways.
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Oct-18-18, 14:36
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mike_d mike_d is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
ROFL.

I don't eat rubbber, lol.
Yeah, or egg white omelets either so I don't care
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  #11   ^
Old Thu, Oct-18-18, 17:42
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
It isn't clear to me that the fat in the cheese "lowers" cholesterol so much as doesn't raise it, compared to "butter plus low fat cheese." Or that low fat cheese plus olive oil or just low fat cheese without the added butter wouldn't have resulted in a lower cholesterol. Or that I need to lower my cholesterol anyways.


Cheeses are complex with a wide variety of microbes, and the changes they invoke. Honestly I never gave it much thought until recentlyy. Dr Atkins mentions avoiding cheese for those with over growth issues, it is on a list that includes vinegars. More recently cheeses high in vitamin k2 became an interest, and gouda rates highly and other cheese that is aged has more than shorter aging times. Like 3 month cheddar v. 12 m cheddar. Then the fat solvable vitamins can vary greatly. Anyway..... you get my point.
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  #12   ^
Old Fri, Oct-19-18, 09:19
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Cheeses are complex with a wide variety of microbes, and the changes they invoke. Honestly I never gave it much thought until recentlyy. Dr Atkins mentions avoiding cheese for those with over growth issues, it is on a list that includes vinegars. More recently cheeses high in vitamin k2 became an interest, and gouda rates highly and other cheese that is aged has more than shorter aging times. Like 3 month cheddar v. 12 m cheddar. Then the fat solvable vitamins can vary greatly. Anyway..... you get my point.

Good points. Like so many other general pronouncements about dietary influence of a food that can vary by variety, much more needs to be understood. I don't believe cheese can raise cholesterol depending on one's WOE, but the variety of cheese types and some of the processed cheeses on the market make the issue much more complex than simply stating that cheese "lowers cholesterol" particularly what is referred to as "bad" cholesterol. At some point someone will say (yes, recognizing Paul Harvey) "here's the rest of the story."
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  #13   ^
Old Tue, Oct-23-18, 06:40
64dodger 64dodger is offline
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Default

Low fat diets will turn out to be killers when it is all said and done.
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