Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 09:13
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,993
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Ontario
Default Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...81010144438.htm

Quote:
Type 2 diabetes is driven by many metabolic pathways, with some pathways driven by amino acids, the molecular building blocks for proteins. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that one amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.

"Our study shows that it's possible we can use specific nutrients, in this case amino acids, to change metabolism in a cell, and these changes in metabolism can change how cells take up and release glucose in a beneficial way," says Mary-Elizabeth Patti, MD, an investigator in Joslin's Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism and senior author on a paper about the work recently published in Molecular Metabolism.

Performed in cells and in mice, her group's research began with an attempt to see what nutrients might activate a key protein called AMP kinase (AMPK), says Patti, who is also an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

"AMPK is an enzyme in cells throughout the body that is activated when nutrient supplies are low, or in response to exercise," she explains. "AMPK then causes a lot of beneficial changes in the cell, turning on genes that serve to increase energy production. AMPK is a good thing, and it also can be activated by a variety of treatments for type 2 diabetes, such as metformin."

That raised a question for Patti and her colleagues: Could an amino acid switch on this beneficial enzyme?

The investigators began their study by testing many amino acids in rat liver cells (the liver is a crucial organ in glucose metabolism). "Alanine was the one amino acid that was consistently able to activate AMPK," Patti says.

The researchers then confirmed that AMPK was producing some of its usual metabolic effects after alanine activation. Additionally, the activation could be seen in human and mouse liver cells as well as rat liver cells, and was present with either high or low levels of glucose in the cells.

Next, scientists gave alanine by mouth to mice and found that levels of AMPK rose in the animals. Moreover, if mice ate alanine before they received a dose of glucose, their resulting blood glucose levels were significantly lower. And while glucose metabolism often behaves quite differently in lean mice than in obese mice, this mechanism was seen in both groups of mice.

Following up, the Joslin team found that the glucose lowering didn't seem to be driven by increases in insulin secretion or decreases in secretion of glucagon, a hormone that increases glucose. Instead, AMPK was boosting glucose uptake in the liver and decreasing glucose release. Further experiments in cells demonstrated that the activated enzyme was altering the Krebs cycle, a central component of cell metabolism.

"All these data together suggest that amino acids, and specifically alanine, may be a unique potential way to modify glucose metabolism," Patti sums up. "If it eventually turns out that you can do that by taking an oral drug as a pre-treatment before a meal, that would be of interest. However, this is early-stage research, and we need to test the concept both in mice and ultimately in humans."


Always gotta get to that potential for a patentable drug punchline.

Alanine makes sense as a glucose metabolism signalling molecule. The alanine-glucose cycle, in which glucose carbon and nitrogen from breakdown of amino acids, mostly from muscle, are transported for disposal by the liver through deamination and gluconeogenesis is more active when glucose metabolism in muscle is high--that is, when alanine is elevated, it's often because muscle is already burning plenty of glucose, which they couldn't be doing if they didn't already have a steady supply of the stuff.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 10:43
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 2,411
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

The medical research groups continue to chase blood glucose lowering as the key to Metabolic Syndrome symptoms, specifically T2D. Lots to learn here, but it occurs to me that stability of insulin and managing insulin and glucagon release to occur in a steady state is the important element here. Yes, it's an opportunity when you can identify a new drug, as revenue realization is always the priority and the carrot. While alanine is manufactured endogenously and is a non-essential amino acid, exogenous sources (meat) may be preferable to a drug to increase alanine if it turns out to be beneficial.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 21:40
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 8,951
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/217/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 32%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

How does phenylalanine connect to alanine?
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Sat, Oct-13-18, 20:28
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,342
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylalanine
Quote:
Phenylalanine (symbol Phe or F) is an α-amino acid with the formula C 9H 11NO 2. It can be viewed as a benzyl group substituted for the methyl group of alanine, or a phenyl group in place of a terminal hydrogen of alanine.

Both are amino acids. As a side note, phenylalanine is the amino acid people born with the genetic disorder PKU have problems with.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 19:05.


Copyright © 2000-2018 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.