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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Oct-01-18, 15:51
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
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Default Dr. Dale Bredesen on Preventing and Reversing Alzheimer's Disease

Dr. Dale Bredesen on Preventing and Reversing Alzheimer's Disease 10-1-2018 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Dr. Dale Bredesen on Preventing and Reversing Alzheimer's Disease < video

Dale E. Bredesen, M.D., is a professor of neurology at the Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Dr. Bredesen’s laboratory focuses on identifying and understanding basic mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative process and the translation of this knowledge into effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. He has collaborated on the publication of more than 220 academic research papers.

He and his colleagues have identified several subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease and has developed ReCODE – reversal of cognitive decline – a protocol that offers a new approach to treatment that has reversed symptoms in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Bredesen received his undergraduate degree from the California Institute of Technology and his medical degree from Duke University. He served as Resident and Chief Resident in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He was the Founding President and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and Adjunct Professor at UCSF.
The major subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease.

Identified just over a century ago, Alzheimer’s disease is a complex, multifaceted condition that affects nearly 44 million people worldwide. In this episode, Dr. Dale Bredesen identifies the defining characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease and enumerates its primary subtypes:

The inflammatory subtype of Alzheimer’s disease.
A type characterized by systemic inflammation, reflected in such laboratory results as a high hs-CRP (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), low albumin:globulin ratio, and high cytokine levels such as interleukin-1 and interleukin-6.
The atrophic subtype of Alzheimer's disease — a reduction in support for synaptogenesis.
A type characterized by an atrophic profile, with reduced support from molecules such as estradiol, progesterone, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), testosterone, insulin, and vitamin D, often accompanied by increased homocysteine and insulin resistance, the last feature of which Dr. Bredesen refers to as type 1.5 or glycotoxicity.
The cortical subtype of Alzheimer's disease — an environmental toxin-related type associated with chronic Inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) that presents with more general cerebral atrophy and frontal-temporal-parietal abnormalities, resulting in an emphasis on executive deficits, rather than the more amnestic quality of hippocampal impairment.

Although the subtypes vary in their causes and manifestation and often overlap to some degree, Dr. Bredesen explains that the underlying pathological features – the accumulation of amyloid beta plaques and tau tangles – are unifying aspects of the disease. He adds that how these features play out in the somewhat fragile environment of the brain depends on a wide array of contextual parameters, such as genetics and lifestyle factors, including diet, sleep, exercise, and environmental exposures.
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Oct-01-18, 17:05
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
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Dr Bredesen is presenting an interesting angle. Seems knowing your genetic type is imperative to following the protocol. Then follow that recommendation.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Oct-02-18, 10:50
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
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I'm at around the :53 mark and they're talking about the benefits of heat shock / sauna (a favorite Dr. Rhonda Patrick subject!) and Dr. Bredesen brings up Castile soap. Has anyone tried this?
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Oct-02-18, 11:02
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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I have dreamed of making my own soap but had to back burner this project.

This looks like a good recipe. https://nwedible.com/how-to-make-di...d-castile-soap/

I havent found bar type in my area.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Oct-02-18, 18:38
Zei Zei is offline
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Kirk's castile soap is available both at HEB (for those in my area) and possibly Walmart, where they have had it and still might depending on your particular store. Quality seems fine. Of course there's always places you can order from like Amazon, too. I wash my hair with various bar soaps and my hands with liquid castile from Amazon (Dr. Bronners), as the chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate etc. are drying and irritating to the skin.
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Old Wed, Oct-03-18, 07:57
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
I wash my hair with various bar soaps and my hands with liquid castile from Amazon (Dr. Bronners), as the chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate etc. are drying and irritating to the skin.


Dr. Bronners is what I get for washing all of me. I have a bottle of it diluted to the strength I like and it's shampoo, body wash, and hand soap.

I discovered that even though I live in a place with harsh winters and we really need the humidifier, all my dry skin and scalp issues completely cleared up, by themselves, with such a tactic.

My entire body was suffering from a low level irritation I wasn't even aware of until that went away.

After all, sodium lauryl sulfate is an engine degreaser. We don't need to put that on our body.
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Oct-03-18, 18:32
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,347
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Dr. Bronners is what I get for washing all of me. I have a bottle of it diluted to the strength I like and it's shampoo, body wash, and hand soap.

I discovered that even though I live in a place with harsh winters and we really need the humidifier, all my dry skin and scalp issues completely cleared up, by themselves, with such a tactic.

My entire body was suffering from a low level irritation I wasn't even aware of until that went away.

After all, sodium lauryl sulfate is an engine degreaser. We don't need to put that on our body.

It's humid here even in winter, but cold (and especially cold water) caused eczema flare-ups on my hands each winter until I realized the cleaning products were to blame.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Oct-04-18, 05:35
SilverEm SilverEm is offline
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Plan: VLC Pastoral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
I have dreamed of making my own soap but had to back burner this project.

This looks like a good recipe. https://nwedible.com/how-to-make-di...d-castile-soap/

I havent found bar type in my area.


Liquid soap by the hot process method is a lot of work, and not a good project for a beginning soapmaker.

Making bar soap by the cold process method is easy, and olive oil soap is a great beginning project.

Traditionally, for many soapmakers true Castile soap is made with 100% olive oil. However, the name "Castile soap" is given to other soaps. Here is a blog about the name and the controversy over its use:
https://botaniesoap.com/blog/whos-r...t-castile-soap/

Here are instructions for cold process, olive oil, bar soap:
https://www.soapqueen.com/bath-and-...-soap-tutorial/

I make the bars and then dissolve them in distilled water for shampoo and shower. Adding a little castor oil to the recipe gives bubbles in the lather. Olive oil soap does not lather. It just feels sort of slippery.

I use it with baking soda for brushing teeth, too.

----

I have found that I feel better using only soap, not detergents. Most commercial shampoos, soaps, etc., even at health food stores have surfactants, and are not true soap.

Info on detergents and surfactants:

https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/c...hemistry_2.aspx

Excerpt:

Detergent surfactants were developed in response to a shortage of animal and vegetable fats and oils during World War I and World War II. In addition, a substance that was resistant to hard water was needed to make cleaning more effective. At that time, petroleum was found to be a plentiful source for the manufacture of these surfactants. Today, detergent surfactants are made from a variety of petrochemicals (derived from petroleum) and/or oleochemicals (derived from fats and oils).

[I added bold type.]


Info on soap here:
https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/c..._chemistry.aspx

Soaps are water-soluble sodium or potassium salts of fatty acids. Soaps are made from fats and oils, or their fatty acids, by treating them chemically with a strong alkali.

If you've ever put some salt in a greasy pan to wipe out the grease, you've made a mild form of soap.

Making cold process soap is easy, but there are safety precautions which must be followed. Proper preparation and tools/ingredients, and knowing exactly what one is doing are absolutely necessary for safety, due to lye being extremely caustic.

For me, real soap is as much a part of health as a good food plan.
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  #9   ^
Old Thu, Oct-04-18, 10:34
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Plan: atkins
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Thanks Aunt Em.

We only use DOve for soap-- doc said it was better. Otherwise, now that my hair is short I started using that bar soap to wash my hair. Looking for a way to eliminate the plastic bottles the shampoos come in.
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Oct-04-18, 14:32
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,347
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Thanks Aunt Em.

We only use DOve for soap-- doc said it was better. Otherwise, now that my hair is short I started using that bar soap to wash my hair. Looking for a way to eliminate the plastic bottles the shampoos come in.

That's the type I recommend. It leaves hair feeling cleaner and softer, more conditioned than other soaps. Castile bar left a sort of greasy feel like the hair hadn't been cleaned even with lots of lathering.
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  #11   ^
Old Thu, Oct-04-18, 14:41
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Speaking of soap, what do you all think of glycerin soap?
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