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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 06:08
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
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Default Seriously, Juice is not healthy

An unthinkable title a few years ago...

Op-Ed in the New York Times.

Quote:

By Erika R. Cheng, Lauren G. Fiechtner and Aaron E. Carroll

The writers are professors of pediatrics.

Obesity affects 40 percent of adults and 19 percent of children in the United States and accounts for more than $168 billion in health care spending each year. Sugary beverages are thought to be one of the major drivers of the obesity epidemic. These drinks (think soda and sports drinks) are the largest single source of added sugars for Americans and contribute, on average, 145 added calories a day to our diets. For these reasons, reducing sugary beverage consumption has been a significant focus of public health intervention. Most efforts have focused on sodas.

But not juice. Juice, for some reason, gets a pass. It’s not clear why.
Americans drink a lot of juice. The average adult drinks 6.6 gallons per year. More than half of preschool-age children (ages 2 to 5) drink juice regularly, a proportion that, unlike for sodas, has not budged in recent decades. These children consume on average 10 ounces per day, more than twice the amount recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Parents tend to associate juice with healthfulness, are unaware of its relationship to weight gain and are reluctant to restrict it in their child’s diet. After all, 100 percent fruit juice — sold in handy individual servings — has been marketed as a natural source of vitamins and calcium. Department of Agriculture guidelines state that up to half of fruit servings can be provided in the form of 100 percent juice and recommend drinking fortified orange juice for the vitamin D. Some brands of juice are even marketed to infants.

Government programs designed to provide healthy food for children, such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, offer juice for kids. Researchers have found that children in the program are more likely to exceed the recommended daily fruit juice limit than those who are similarly poor but not enrolled.

Despite all the marketing and government support, fruit juices contain limited nutrients and tons of sugar. In fact, one 12-ounce glass of orange juice contains 10 teaspoons of sugar, which is roughly what’s in a can of Coke.

Drinking fruit juice is not the same as eating whole fruit. While eating certain fruits like apples and grapes is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes, drinking fruit juice is associated with the opposite. Juices contain more concentrated sugar and calories. They also have less fiber, which makes you feel full. Because juice can be consumed quickly, it is more likely than whole fruit to contribute to excess carbohydrate intake. For example, research has found that adults who drank apple juice before a meal felt hungrier and ate more calories than those who started with an apple instead. Children who drink juice instead of eating fruit may similarly feel less full and may be more likely to snack throughout the day.

Juice may also be a “gateway beverage” — 1-year-olds who drank more juice also drank more sugary beverages, including more soda, in their school-age years. Children’s excessive consumption of juice has been linked to an increased risk of weight gain, shorter stature and cavities. Even in the absence of weight gain, sugar consumption worsens blood pressure and increases cholesterol. It’s tempting to minimize the negative contributions of juice to our diets because it’s “natural” or because it contains “vitamins.” Studies that support this view exist, but many are biased and have been questioned. And we doubt you’d take a multivitamin if it contained 10 teaspoons of sugar.

There is no evidence that juice improves health. It should be treated like other sugary beverages, which are fine to have periodically if you want them, but not because you need them. Parents should instead serve water and focus on trying to increase children’s intake of whole fruit. Juice should no longer be served regularly in day care centers and schools. Public health efforts should challenge government guidelines that equate fruit juice with whole fruit, because these guidelines most likely fuel the false perception that drinking fruit juice is good for health.

It’s much easier to prevent obesity than it is to reverse it. We need to teach kids how to eat healthier when they’re young so that they develop good habits to carry on for the rest of their lives. In the past decade or so, we have succeeded in recognizing the harms of sugary beverages like soda. We can’t keep pretending that juice is different.


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/07/...lthy-sugar.html

Many links in the on-line article.
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 06:33
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
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I'm old enough to remember when juice served in restaurants was in a little 4-oz glass. I love those glasses - I have 4 that I got from beer festivals as tasting glasses. They're what I use if I drink V8 or similar veg juice.

(Puts on tin-foil hat) I'm sure TPTB will fight back against this kind of anti-juice opinion, because what else will they do with all of the fruit that isn't good enough to be sold on grocery store shelves, if they can't turn it into juice and sell it to us?
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:04
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
After all, 100 percent fruit juice — sold in handy individual servings — has been marketed as a natural source of vitamins and calcium. Department of Agriculture guidelines state that up to half of fruit servings can be provided in the form of 100 percent juice and recommend drinking fortified orange juice for the vitamin D.


Whoa.

Pray tell, what juice naturally contains calcium? It's all added, so that the juice has some kind of nutritional value (other than the few vitamins in it, which quickly degenerate after the fruit is juiced).

The push to fortify orange juice with vitamin D makes it sound as if fortifying it with D will actually increase the body's vitamin D levels, despite being delivered with no added fats, since being a fat soluble vitamin, D can't be absorbed in the absence of dietary fat.

Quote:
Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, offer juice for kids.


They're talking about WIC, which is the food supplemental division which allows additional provisions for pregnant or nursing women, infants and children. WIC checks name specific items each beneficiary is allowed. WIC does not permit fortified juices - just plain, 100% juice. Pure sugar with a fruity flavor.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:12
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teaser teaser is offline
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It's a "natural" food that unnaturally contains calcium. What is it about the word "natural" that you don't understand?
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:13
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine
I'm old enough to remember when juice served in restaurants was in a little 4-oz glass. I love those glasses - I have 4 that I got from beer festivals as tasting glasses. They're what I use if I drink V8 or similar veg juice.

(Puts on tin-foil hat) I'm sure TPTB will fight back against this kind of anti-juice opinion, because what else will they do with all of the fruit that isn't good enough to be sold on grocery store shelves, if they can't turn it into juice and sell it to us?



They'll just use it to make an ever increasing number of types of squeeze pouches of fruit based goo for babies and toddlers, sauces (apple sauce, pear sauce, etc), canned pie fillings, fruit leathers, and "all natural" fruit flavored candy. Problem solved.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:17
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
It's a "natural" food that unnaturally contains calcium. What is it about the word "natural" that you don't understand?



:duh: (I don't think we have a :duh: smiley. We need one.) Maybe a :banghead: smiley would work.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:55
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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NO juice for my kids. I weaned them off it by about 5-7 years old. They only had diluted juice but looking back I wish I had known more and not introduced it at all.

I dont waste money on juice. And no sugared sports drink. ( I keep lemon gatorade for emergencies for the livestock.) My youngest son prefers a protein drink or chiaseed drink after a workout.

Pediatric appointments sort of beat around the bush when it comes to the diet of children. They ask just a few questions---and as a parent left wondering what they are after.

I was pushed to change from whole milk to 2%. I REFUSED to cut those fat calories as my kids eat good quality foods thanks to my reading of DANDR. They finally gave up harassing me on that.

We did start up buying a huge soda after hours of working in the garden, and would stop on the way home for a big refreshing soda....but that too has been nixxed by me and the kids have adapted to the "no". And I explain what that sugar does in their body......54oz of soda has a shocking amount of sugar!


I dont depend on the "government" for food advice. I come HERE.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 07:58
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
They'll just use it to make an ever increasing number of types of squeeze pouches of fruit based goo for babies and toddlers, sauces (apple sauce, pear sauce, etc), canned pie fillings, fruit leathers, and "all natural" fruit flavored candy. Problem solved.



I started reading about about jaw and teeth development, and all these sauces are not helpful to correct development. Eating whole foods and chewing is VITAL to proper jaw construction as the child grows. CHEWING is important.

I wish I had known this when my kids were little--
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 08:27
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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While visiting my sister, we discussed this very topic yesterday and laughed about how back in the day we'd cut cranberry juice with soda water. Even diluted, it has a massive amount of sugar. I found out the hard way years ago when I ordered a can of cranberry juice (thinking it was a healthy choice) early in a flight to the west coast and had my first hypo upon arriving in San Francisco. I was able to get to the lounge before my next flight and 1 chocolate chip cookie completely restored me. That incident alerted me to two things: 1) Cranberry juice has a boatload of sugar, 2) I had a blood sugar issue that the doctors could never find with a simple BG test. That incident started the beginning of my interest in low carb.
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 08:42
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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My reaction to these types of articles lately has been "You've just figured this out?"
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Jul-08-18, 11:46
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BillyHW BillyHW is offline
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And yet, the authors of the article have no better argument against sugary beverages other than that they are "empty calories" and "liquid calories". And then they even admit that juice calories aren't empty but come with vitamins and minerals.

So then we are just down to "liquid calories" and lack of fiber (which if you don't eat at least 30g per day of you're going to die!!!)

No mention of insulin. No mention of fructose causing insulin resistance and fatty liver.
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Jul-09-18, 04:27
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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It's an Op-Ed, not an expose. If you want that, you can read Gary Taubes "What If It's all been a Big Fat Lie?" bumped up yesterday, near the top of this section now. 16 years ago he wrote all about insulin and fructose in the NYT and we are still waiting for dietary guidelines to change.
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Jul-09-18, 09:38
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Well, they did change to the plate...... (wink, wink)
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