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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Jul-01-18, 22:47
BillyHW's Avatar
BillyHW BillyHW is offline
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Posts: 378
 
Plan: Keto + IF
Stats: 260/300/165 Male 5' 6"
BF:
Progress: -42%
Location: Alberta, Canada
Default Bright Line Eating

Has anyone else seen this?

https://brightlineeating.com/what-is-ble/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK..._3SzNALJlvieH-Q

She seems to take a partially low-carb approach (i.e. no sugar, no flour) but with more focus on tackling the addictive nature of people with obesity.

Maybe this is another piece of the puzzle in addition to controlling hormones/insulin.

What do you guys think about this?
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 07:09
Susky2's Avatar
Susky2 Susky2 is offline
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Posts: 88
 
Plan: Keto-ish
Stats: 339/286/245 Male 76 inches
BF:
Progress: 56%
Location: Central PA
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I agree that understanding and approaching the addictive nature is a big thing. After all, many of us need to unlearn all of the dumb things that have been drilled into our skulls from birth.

I'm not really on board with the fascist sounding words I'm reading. It seems almost cult like, and that can be as much of a slippery slope as any addiction. "Here's my money - take control of my life and tell me what to eat, because I can't make good decisions myself."

I'm more about educating, directing, and letting people internalize what they need to know, so that they can apply it in their daily lives. But I suppose not everybody can do this, and there are people feel like they need to be led by the nose through their existence.

I'm also not keen on the "I'll teach you if you join my program" approach. I appreciate the right to run a business, but there is so much free information available, and there is nothing I need to buy other than good, wholesome food - it's one of the great things about adopting this lifestyle. But I suppose that again, some people would rather pay somebody to lead them to the promised land than actually do the work and learn on their own.

I did get a chuckle about the phrase, "...a liberating stand against moderation." Extremism is liberation! What???
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 08:35
Verbena Verbena is offline
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Posts: 826
 
Plan: My own
Stats: 186/155/150 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 86%
Location: SW PNW
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I have a friend who has followed this plan. She even worked for the company for awhile. It worked very well for her. Her husband, who did/does not need to lose weight follows it with her, and is happy with the food choices. She is looking much healthier since choosing this way of eating.
That said, I tend to think more along the lines of Susky2. Why pay for something I can do on my own? But I do not have an addictive personality; once I have learned the "whys" of something, and accepted that, for example, eating a certain way is better for my health, I am able to follow that path pretty steadily. Others, I know, cannot always do this, and perhaps the strict guidelines of this program are better for them.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 08:46
cshepard cshepard is offline
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Posts: 393
 
Plan: Atkins - maintenance
Stats: 156/123/125 Female 64"
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: BC, Canada
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My sister-in-law is in this program, in fact, she just got back from a Bright Line Convention in San Diego and met the author, Susan Peirce, in person.
She has struggled to lose weight with different plans all of her life and is doing very well with this one.
I agree that not all of Susan’s ideas resonate with me and I prefer learning and implementing on my own for free, but I can see that some people need the hard and fast rules, the exclusive community and attention, and quite literally, to pay real money for the service in order to stick to the committment.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 08:47
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cotonpal cotonpal is offline
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Posts: 4,174
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
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My daughter-in-law followed this plan for a while and was very happy with it. Then her daughter (my granddaughter) got diagnosed with cancer and her life became very disrupted with regular hospital stays many hours from home and no easy way to stick with the plan. My granddaughter recently was able to stop treatment and everything is going well so far. I do not know whether my daughter-in-law plans to go back on this plan but I think the structure was very helpful for her. Different people need different things.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 10:48
BillyHW's Avatar
BillyHW BillyHW is offline
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Posts: 378
 
Plan: Keto + IF
Stats: 260/300/165 Male 5' 6"
BF:
Progress: -42%
Location: Alberta, Canada
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cshepard
My sister-in-law is in this program, in fact, she just got back from a Bright Line Convention in San Diego and met the author, Susan Peirce, in person.
She has struggled to lose weight with different plans all of her life and is doing very well with this one.
I agree that not all of Susan’s ideas resonate with me and I prefer learning and implementing on my own for free, but I can see that some people need the hard and fast rules, the exclusive community and attention, and quite literally, to pay real money for the service in order to stick to the committment.


Good point. I wonder if membership in Weight Watchers is a big part of their (initial) success as well.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 10:53
BillyHW's Avatar
BillyHW BillyHW is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 378
 
Plan: Keto + IF
Stats: 260/300/165 Male 5' 6"
BF:
Progress: -42%
Location: Alberta, Canada
Default

Okay so I watched a few more of her videos. She seems to be very negative on ketogenic diets, although her diet still seems to be moderate low-carb.

She does seem to have quite a bit of knowledge on the addictive aspects of food for people with obesity problems, and on the psychological aspects of maintenance.

One suggestion that I didn't like to hear was to keep your food bland. She did back it up with a study that showed obese people did much better with bland, tasteless food, lacking variety. Sigh, I didn't like hearing that because I really don't like bland boring food.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 12:03
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Posts: 1,104
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyHW
Okay so I watched a few more of her videos. She seems to be very negative on ketogenic diets, although her diet still seems to be moderate low-carb.

She does seem to have quite a bit of knowledge on the addictive aspects of food for people with obesity problems, and on the psychological aspects of maintenance.

One suggestion that I didn't like to hear was to keep your food bland. She did back it up with a study that showed obese people did much better with bland, tasteless food, lacking variety. Sigh, I didn't like hearing that because I really don't like bland boring food.



I'm sure part of it depends on the individual - if you're someone who will overeat anything just because it's really tasty, then perhaps more bland is better, since you won't be as inclined to overindulge in just one more serving, one more spoonful, one more bite, past the point of feeling sufficiently full. Other people may keep eating something that's not particularly tasty, waiting for some kind of magical point where the taste buds say ENOUGH! -whether it's because they're sick of the blandness, or because it's finally clear that they're not going to reach that taste-satiation level.



Of course if the carb levels are not really low enough for your particular metabolism, that can also lead to overindulgence, simply based on how your body reacts to even a small amount of carb overload.



Unfortunately, if there's no room for personalizing the diet to your carb tolerance, and how taste affects your particular appetite, then it's not going to work well for you.



I just watched a little of her video about keto and um sorry...she says BLE is lots and lots and LOTS of veggies, with only (as she said) a little protein and a little fat - that makes it simply another low calorie diet. But since I admittedly have not read in detail about the diet itself, she may be exaggerating those proportions a bit, and it may be a lot more geared towards LC than low calorie, since staying away from flour and sugar certainly would lead to a lower carb diet.



Likewise, in the video about the engagement party where there were no good BLE choices - she said there was cheese, pepperoni, and some veggies available. This may not work for everyone, but if I was at a point where I was getting hungry, and there was cheese, that's what I'd have. It doesn't even take that much cheese to hold me over for several hours - usually about 2 oz will be enough. I'd probably skip the pepperoni and veggies, because the cheese would be enough. However, if I just followed her suggestion and didn't eat, I'd likely be ravenous by the time I was out of there, and more likely to overeat whatever was readily available.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 12:16
cshepard cshepard is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 393
 
Plan: Atkins - maintenance
Stats: 156/123/125 Female 64"
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: BC, Canada
Default

I agree that any diet that completely cuts out refined sugar and flour is a huge step in the right direction and even with the curtailed amounts of fat she lists, weight loss will happen with most people. My sis inlaw finds it difficult to eat the amount of veggies required (most of which is in the form of salad greens) and I suspect this is what keeps a person on the program satiated.
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 12:45
Verbena Verbena is offline
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Posts: 826
 
Plan: My own
Stats: 186/155/150 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 86%
Location: SW PNW
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I didn't learn a lot about the diet from my friend - one, she was traveling alot at the time, and two, it didn't really interest me as I had found my own way by then. But I seem to remember her making a big pot of beans just about every day; now THAT would keep me full, but also probably give stomach aches. Also, LC is called "restrictive" by some, but my friend had to eat certain things at certain times, so going out to eat was a major problem. Kind of MY definition of restrictive.
I say this all in the past tense, but I think she is still doing it. Has been out of state for the last several months, so I haven't actually talked with her in quite a while
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 14:09
Susky2's Avatar
Susky2 Susky2 is offline
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Posts: 88
 
Plan: Keto-ish
Stats: 339/286/245 Male 76 inches
BF:
Progress: 56%
Location: Central PA
Default

I haven't looked deeply into the program, but I'm also fearing that she's putting a lot of stock into psychological issues. On her main page, she mentions leptin, but only describes it as the hormone that makes you eat less and want to work out more.

There is a lot more to metabolic processes and hormonal interplay with eating and weight maintenance. It's not just about the willpower and mental approach. Placing it all on psychology is to toe the line of shame and potentially lend credence to starvation and workout maniacs like Jillian Michaels (another person who is known for "boot camps").
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Jul-02-18, 17:27
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Posts: 1,104
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cshepard
I agree that any diet that completely cuts out refined sugar and flour is a huge step in the right direction and even with the curtailed amounts of fat she lists, weight loss will happen with most people. My sis inlaw finds it difficult to eat the amount of veggies required (most of which is in the form of salad greens) and I suspect this is what keeps a person on the program satiated.


I was wondering in the video about the engagement party why she found the veggies in the little cups of dip to be impossible to navigate - this explains why she insisted she would have needed about 40 of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verbena
I didn't learn a lot about the diet from my friend - one, she was traveling alot at the time, and two, it didn't really interest me as I had found my own way by then. But I seem to remember her making a big pot of beans just about every day; now THAT would keep me full, but also probably give stomach aches. Also, LC is called "restrictive" by some, but my friend had to eat certain things at certain times, so going out to eat was a major problem. Kind of MY definition of restrictive.
I say this all in the past tense, but I think she is still doing it. Has been out of state for the last several months, so I haven't actually talked with her in quite a while


Cutting out the flour and sugar is most definitely a huge step in the right direction - but I can't imagine eating huge amounts of salad greens or beans every single day. Just too darn much fiber for some guts to handle without causing bathroom issues. Not to mention that if I was eating a big pot of beans in the course of a day, that would be entirely too many carbs for this metabolism to handle without setting off the blood sugar roller coaster.

Being forced to eat certain things at certain times - well, that's fine if you don't mind doing it, and your schedule can accommodate it. Personally, my work schedule is different every single week, very often different from day to day, and I never know when (or even if) I will get a break at work. (I work in a grocery store - no eating or drinking allowed on the job) Eating a specific thing at a specific time just wouldn't work out. I need food that sustains me for hours and hours and hours, just in case I don't get a chance to eat during work hours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Susky2
I haven't looked deeply into the program, but I'm also fearing that she's putting a lot of stock into psychological issues. On her main page, she mentions leptin, but only describes it as the hormone that makes you eat less and want to work out more.

There is a lot more to metabolic processes and hormonal interplay with eating and weight maintenance. It's not just about the willpower and mental approach. Placing it all on psychology is to toe the line of shame and potentially lend credence to starvation and workout maniacs like Jillian Michaels (another person who is known for "boot camps").


To be sure, there are psychological issues involved in obesity, especially if you've been fighting your weight and an uncontrollable appetite for several decades.

But in general, there is entirely too much emphasis in the weight loss industry on will power, and I would imagine the whole idea of all those salad greens and beans is to provide huge amounts of fiber to keep you full, with that fullness providing a lot of the needed willpower.

I don't need for my stomach to feel full to bursting from stuffing a ton of beans and greens into it - I just need to feel satiated, a state which is easily reached with a decent amount of protein and fats, with or without a little bit of green veggies or a few berries. That, along with the fact that protein and fats don't set of the blood sugar roller coaster is enough to keep me satisfied for hours.

If people are having success with her BLE diet, fine - it just seems awfully restrictive to me, especially if you can't even enjoy the foods you can eat at a party, and will instead choose to just not eat. (I've been to parties where the only LC foods were some cheese, veggie sticks, and some berries - I did just fine on those)
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  #13   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 02:13
Grav Grav is offline
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Posts: 891
 
Plan: Banting
Stats: 302/185/187 Male 175cm
BF:
Progress: 102%
Location: New Zealand
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I'm not fond of the concept of willpower in general. In my experience, willpower is only something you need to convince yourself that a given plan will work. But if that plan turns out never to work for whatever reason, then it never really mattered how much willpower you had in the first place anyway. And if it does, then you only needed willpower long enough to see the results, which typically isn't very long either.

When some people find out what I've accomplished, they might marvel at my willpower. But it really wasn't a major factor for me at all. Simply put, nothing else ever worked for me, but LCHF worked almost straight away, so that's what I've stuck with. The bigger factor at play for me was not willpower, but just patience!

I don't rate the "boot camp" expression, either. To me, "boot camps" imply that some huge degree of effort is required. But if it's the right plan, then surely near enough is good enough? Again, I don't feel like I had to go to any great effort to lose my weight. Once I'd learned enough, worked through the options and developed my own routine, the rest just seemed to take care of itself. For a plan to be sustainable, it surely can't be too hard?

If this place is helping some people to improve (and maintain) themselves, then great. But if I had to do it all over again, I don't imagine I'd be drawn to a place like that.
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 10:05
Verbena Verbena is offline
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Posts: 826
 
Plan: My own
Stats: 186/155/150 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 86%
Location: SW PNW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grav
I'm not fond of the concept of willpower in general. In my experience, willpower is only something you need to convince yourself that a given plan will work. But if that plan turns out never to work for whatever reason, then it never really mattered how much willpower you had in the first place anyway. And if it does, then you only needed willpower long enough to see the results, which typically isn't very long either.

When some people find out what I've accomplished, they might marvel at my willpower. But it really wasn't a major factor for me at all. Simply put, nothing else ever worked for me, but LCHF worked almost straight away, so that's what I've stuck with. The bigger factor at play for me was not willpower, but just patience!

I don't rate the "boot camp" expression, either. To me, "boot camps" imply that some huge degree of effort is required. But if it's the right plan, then surely near enough is good enough? Again, I don't feel like I had to go to any great effort to lose my weight. Once I'd learned enough, worked through the options and developed my own routine, the rest just seemed to take care of itself. For a plan to be sustainable, it surely can't be too hard?

If this place is helping some people to improve (and maintain) themselves, then great. But if I had to do it all over again, I don't imagine I'd be drawn to a place like that.


Totally agree, Grav. A number of people have complimented me on my willpower over the last 5 years; it is meant well, and I take it as it is meant. But also say that it isn't willpower, it is just the way I eat, how I wish to eat. The things they admire me for abstaining from hold no attraction for me anymore, so it is not a matter of willpower to stay away. It's fairly obvious however that they don't believe me
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 15:01
cshepard cshepard is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 393
 
Plan: Atkins - maintenance
Stats: 156/123/125 Female 64"
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: BC, Canada
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Willpower, strength, determination, fortitude, resoluteness - call it what you will, but most people need it to overcome both the physical addiction to sugar and it’s effects, in addition to the psycological and sociological ties to desserts and bread, often with extreme pressure from the outside to keep imbibing.
This is the struggle my sis inlaw has been failing at ... until she joined the Bright Line program. She literally did not have what it takes to commit to a healthy WOE despite obesity, diabetes, arthritic pain and many other problems.

For myself, like others here, no extra ‘willpower’ was needed, I feel my success has been due to simple patience, and I found it easy to love low carb food choices and to be further encouraged with positive results, but I can see that is not even close to the truth for my sis inlaw. She is losing weight steadily now and more power to her for finding a program that can provide her with will to stick with it.
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