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  #16   ^
Old Sun, Jul-15-18, 13:59
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ImOnMyWay ImOnMyWay is offline
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Quote:
I've tried glycerin with no luck and I've tried booze with no luck. But maybe with BOTH TOGETHER will work. Will try that next time, IOMW. Thanks


I hope you get results consistent to mine. I don't make ice cream that often. I used 50mL Chambord + glycerin in a strawberry frozen custard.

Strawberry Frozen Custard

The Chambord is only 33 proof, 16.5% alcohol by volume per the label, so it does have sugar in it (it's a liqueur). Carb count was 8 per serving, which I thought was reasonable for what it was. Would I get equally good results in a recipe that doesn't have fruit pulp? I don't know. If I use vodka instead of Chambord, how will that affect the recipe? I don't know. When I make a vanilla frozen custard, I'm going to try it with 50mL of Bailey's Irish Cream + glycerin. I thought about using whiskey in a chocolate frozen custard. Whiskey is 80 proof... and has no sugar... I am curious to see how they compare. I don't want the end product to taste alcoholic. I tasted an ice cream made by a company whose primary business is distilling vodka-- they were sampling it at the liquor store. They're trying to make different products with their vodka, obviously. I thought it was awful, because I could taste the vodka. But it sells very well.

I'm going to make a different recipe that is NOT a frozen custard, Strawberry Sour Cream Ice Cream, from David Leibovitz's, "The Perfect Scoop". I want to adapt many of his recipes. We'll see how it compares in mouthfeel and consistency.

Quote:
Do you refrigerate the glycerine or store it at room temp?


The glycerin is shelf-stable. You do not need to refrigerate it.

Last edited by ImOnMyWay : Sun, Jul-15-18 at 14:04.
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  #17   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 00:21
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ImOnMyWay ImOnMyWay is offline
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By the way, congratulations on the new cookbook!!
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  #18   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 08:20
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Many moons ago in another life I had the opportunity to go to St. Croix several times on business. This allowed some "pleasure" as well, including restaurant meals at nice places. There was one restaurant that served alcoholic ice creams and they were delicious. I dont remember the concoctions, I just remember ordering one every single time I ate at that restaurant. They were very strong and likely had a rum lean since thats the liquor of the Caribbean.

I liked them BECAUSE you could taste the alcohol! Then again, I'm a heavy drinker (AKA "Alcoholic")...even cheap vodka tastes good to me!

This is one of those things that experimenting with is not a huge risk, because the worst case scenario is a runny ice cream or a hard ice cream...chances are anything we sensibly come up with will be tasty either way and we might get lucky and hit the Goldilocks formula..."just right"!

I made a cherry ice cream version of Buttoni's recipe last night. It was delicious, but I think in the case of frozen cherries, using 2 cups, or basically the whole bag of frozen cherries would have been best. I used only half the bag of cherries and the flavor was mild (cherries are a very mild flavor compared to raspberries and blackberries) and the ice cream didn't set well after 30 minutes in the freezer. The second servings are in the freezer for a full hard freeze, we'll see how those eat tonight or in the next couple days. Adding the whole bag or 2 full cups of cherries would have added more "frozen" up front and amped up what is a mild flavor to begin with. We still lapped it up, after 6 months of no ice cream because almost everything out there is high carb (even the no sugar versions), its a real treat, even when its imperfect.
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  #19   ^
Old Wed, Jul-18-18, 20:33
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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Thank you IOMY. I have always chosen not to be "paid" for my contributions to Jen Eloff's LOW CARBING AMONG FRIENDS cookbooks, and am so honored she wanted to thank me in this way. She is doing a second one with my recipes also.
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  #20   ^
Old Wed, Jul-18-18, 20:33
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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Ken, your ice cream sounds delish.
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  #21   ^
Old Fri, Jul-20-18, 09:57
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Peggy,

I was imagining lasagna last night, thinking low carb of course. We're going to a reunion soon where the meal theme will be spaghetti and lasagna, etc. honoring an uncle who died not too long a go who was a WW2 immigrant from Italy. His sauce is a family treat. Folks are going to try to replicate it.

I was trying to come up with ways to deal with this avoiding noodles and the breads everyone will be eating. I know about vegetable based lasagna and have looked at some of your recipes. I dont like any pasta or dumpling recipes I have tried, so I'm not going to do that...I'll stick with zucchini or other squash before going that route.

So, I have been doing varieties of your very versatile focaccia bread, using it for sandwiches, even hot dog rolls for sausages and topped with cream cheese along with lox/smoked salmon. I plan to use it for pizza crust too, but I've been stuck on my lavash pizza and haven't gotten to it.

I had a thought to bake a couple of your focaccia breads, run a knife through horizontally making thin sheets of them, baking the cut sheet a little bit in a modest heat oven to make them even more firm, and then using those as pasta layers.

Since the recipe is more than half cheese, my wife and I thought it might make a decent casserole/lasagna bake. Knowing its a "bready" concept, but thinking it just might make a well set dish that could be sliced and served like lasagna.

Ever try something like that? Thoughts?

It occurred to me a good alternate for spaghetti noodles would be a roasted spaghetti squash, pulled loose with a fork. Duh! I was a little stressed at the thought of a spaghetti dinner event...until my brain started thinking!
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  #22   ^
Old Fri, Jul-20-18, 14:33
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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I don't know how the bread would do, Ken. My thought.......it will soak up the moisture from the sauce and just get soggy. Now if you were to add more shredded cheese to the bread recipe and baked it, then allowed to cool, that might make it more chewy and prevent it acting like a sauce sponge in lasagna. But honestly, I just don't know.

My best results, the most like real lasagna, have been using either eggplant for my noodles, or my glucomannan dumpling dough, rolled out and cut into broad strips. Now both of those render a pretty spectacular lasagna.

I like spaghetti squash OK, but it still tastes kind of gourd/pumpkin-y to me and am personally not so fond of it with Italian meat sauces. I prefer SS with creamy and cheesy sauces, which seem to better hide its fundamental squash taste. Don't get me wrong, I really love spaghetti squash, but not in my Italian food. My fav way to eat it is with sweetener, cinnamon, maple extract and butter, baked off. LOL That's where the pumpkin/squash taste is hidden best.
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  #23   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 12:51
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Thanks for the feedback Peggy. I had the same suspicion about the focaccia getting soggy. I may try the extra cheese and really flattening out the dough, squeezing it between sheet pans, and baking it at a lower temp a longer time, hoping that the rebake would allow it to stay mostly together. I would use the lasagna method that has egg mixed with the ricotta, so that would set the dish up some. I would expect not the same texture as noodles. There is just not a faux noodle recipe I like yet that I have found. I've tried the dumpling dough, and it didn't do it for me, I even splurged and bought LC pasta flour..and it was a waste of $10. Closest to a noodle I've had, very much like your dumpling recipe, but the result has not been worth the effort, taste and texture-wise for me. I can enjoy spiralized zucchini more than that.

People have different tastes and texture preferences, loves and hates. I dont think the spaghetti squash would be a problem for me with an Italian sauce, and would not be interested in a sweet/cinnamony type preparation...the opposite of your preferences! But I have gotten more open minded about Indian and garamasala type flavors. I've never been a big fan of Indian food because they have a lot of sweet and those kinds of spices. Only like the savory lamb and such. I dont associate lunch or dinner with sweet...but a LOT of people love it!

I have though, started making my own breakfast sausage with clove, allspice and such flavors. My wife loves the anise/licorice type flavors, but I never did, all the way back to childhood, but those flavors are really good in a breakfast sausage for me for some reason...and of course the wife loves it! No sweetener though, not even fake sugar. Although the sausage is delicious with syrup.

I think I'll stick with a vegetable lasagna recipe for the reunion, thats more of a proven, rather than risk an experiment. I suppose I could always bake an Italian version of the focaccia and just eat the spaghetti sauce with that on the side and skip the noodles. I will try this experiment at some point though and when I do I'll report back

Last edited by Meetow Kim : Sun, Jul-22-18 at 12:58.
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  #24   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 13:18
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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Ken, here's a link to all my lasagna and lasagna-like recipes. https://buttoni.wordpress.com/?s=lasagna
Some are listed more than once as I re-post the more popular recipes. I find I like eggplant lasagna better than zucchini, as the zucchini seems to bleed out water and ruin it for me even after the salting/drain/wringing routine. Perhaps I just like the taste and texture of eggplant in lasagna better.
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  #25   ^
Old Tue, Jul-24-18, 10:29
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Thanks Peggy, I was just heading over to your site to peruse what you've been doing after a wild ride reading recipes online just using web searches. It's amazing, vegetable and keto lasagna recipes are as varied as soup! People are putting corn and spinach in them!...I suppose that could be good, but doesn't hit me as anywhere near trying to replicate lasagna. One of the meals my wife still cooks...or used to (I do most of the major meal cooking...she cleans up!) is/was lasagna...and it has always been the best of any I ever eat/ate anywhere. I've made it a few times myself with great success. Something I introduced to her when we met was switching out ground beef and or pork with Italian sausage. We usually use the hot/spicy version. We do that with spaghetti, etc. too...its a huge difference. I also make my own sausage, even stuff it, and my Italian version is fantastic...but sometimes I reserve that for "just us" because...we are selfish! really, its just labor intensive and a special treat...I usually grind my own meat too, so store-bought is an easy go to, and still really good.

But, of course, no noodles are the problem, thus the squash, which I think I can dig as an alternative if the casserole keeps the traditional Italian flavors I'm accustomed to.

Looking at your recipes, a couple things pop out at me, It looks like you are making small batches usually. A typical pan of lasagna for us is at least a 9x13 pan, but in the recent decade a stoneware deep sided pan. I'll be working with at least a pound of Italian sausage and a full one pound container of ricotta, probably with 2 eggs in it which of course helps it all set up firm for cutting and serving. Probably a half pound or more of mozz and a generous amount of freshly grated parm reggiano.

I'll have to see if my wife will want eggplant, shes never been a huge fan for some reason but loves basically all other squash. I noticed you do seem to cook your squash first, with zucchini you blanch, then salt, but with eggplant you roast. Most zucchini lasagna recipes I have found otherwise just salt the zucchini and blot dry. I like the idea of roasting the squash slices, that will definitely take out some water and add deeper flavor. Do you see any reason the same could not be done with roasting zucchini slices? I can see seasoning them really well for an added layer of flavor, maybe even salt leeching first.

What do you think about adding some flour? My thought is that would help soak up any remaining moisture after roasting the squash during the casserole baking process. I have almond, coconut, oat, einkhorn. We have those shakers you use to dust powdered sugar with and I used them for dusting bench flour when I used to make pasta. I wonder if a dusting beneath and on top of the layers of squash would soak up some moisture and add to the dish's cohesiveness and slice and serve ability? I wonder what would be the best flour? I saw coconut flour in one recipe that looked to be for thickening the casserole up, but my experience tells me coconut flour remains a little granular even after cooking...good in a muffin, not so good as a coating for instance.

I even thought of coating the squash slices in an LC flour before roasting, and that flour carrying all the way to the final dish. Could even egg wash and coat for an even more complex, yet moisture absorbing situation. Could fry them too, but dont want to go overboard with the added oils in the dish, the cheese and sausage will leech off a lot of oil themselves even though I cook the sausage first and blot/drain.

Here's a recipe for something like what I'm thinking: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/3...ini-parmigiana/

Wonder whats up with the egg whites...lower cholesterol? fluffier/crunchier?

The other night, I made fried green tomato slices using your chicken breader recipe. They were fantastic. Granted, I am highly skilled at fried green tomatoes! The danged squirrels are ravaging my tomatoes in the garden so I'm forced to salvage the green ones they pull of and just leave laying on the ground. They are destructive pests and just pull off fruit they dont even eat.

I'm thinking the pork rind flavor may not be as good in lasagna, but who knows I've seen pancetta and other baconish stuff in recipes, the pork rinds may not be bad. But the flour, egg, flour idea is what I'm thinking, maybe with some whey protein mixed in, I think thats a key element of your chicken breader

Here's one grilling the slices: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/...asagna-51252310

I cant imagine actually grilling them, so thin. BUT, I do have a cast iron griddle pan with the raised lines on one side for that charred lines look and allowing moisture to leach or vaporize away.

Not much in that recipe for moisture control other than blotting the squash after cooking and only 1 egg in the ricotta. I have had good success with recipes on Epicurious. I even contributed there some years ago. This recipe get 4 out of 4 "forks" in the reviews and I didn't see one complaint about excess moisture...which I dont understand how this recipe wouldn't be just as wet as your methods where you tell us the zucchini does make a lot of water...your recipe actually includes a pour off of the moisture part way through baking.

I appreciate these conversations. You obviously are a food blogger, and I'm an avid home cook/chef. It's great to kick around thoughts and ideas and learn along the way.

Last edited by Meetow Kim : Tue, Jul-24-18 at 11:09.
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  #26   ^
Old Tue, Jul-24-18, 15:52
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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Well, my recipes are designed for just two of us, Ken. I've found, over the years, that I think many foods lose something in the freezing/thawing process. And my husband doesn't want to eat the same thing twice in the same week and just NEVER do that two days in a row, God forbid. LOL So the 4 & 6-serving max size on most of my casserole recipes is because of these two problems. But you can always double a recipe for a larger group of people.

Seems like I tried roasting zucchini slices for lasagna one time and it literally fell apart as I dipped it up off the baking pan to construct the lasagna. If you try that, I'd slice it thicker for sure. But the zucchini still bled water into the final baked lasagna and I REALLY don't like that. I just don't zucchini in my Italian dishes much anymore as it has "souped up" one dinner too many. We both adore eggplant and it doesn't have the water-bleeding issues so tht is my "noodle layer" of preference. My glucomannan dumpling dough also works nicely and is the closest to real lasagna IMHO.

I suppose you could bread and oven-bake the zucchini as in my recipe for that, but I suspect it might still bleed out some water when put together in a lasagna. You'd just have to trial that to find out for sure. As I get older, I'm finding I'm tiring of pizza and lasagna (thought that would never happen) and lately, I'm even tiring of BACON and CHEESE, if you can believe that. Not sure if my taste is changing or I'm just burned out on them, since there are sooooooo many recipes for them on low-carb blogs. I go to Pinterest and find myself just bored to tears with all the recipes for pizza, lasagna, bacon-coated everything and gobs and gobs of cheese all over everything. Mind you, these have always been beloved foods for me. But overkill can set in when you've been low-carbing for,,,,,, let me see now........9 years. Maybe I'll have a taste epiphany soon and once again love the "low-carb trinity" of holy foods: cheese, pizza and bacon. I'm still waiting for that to happen. LOL

Last edited by Buttoni : Wed, Jul-25-18 at 10:21.
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, Jul-26-18, 16:25
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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I remember you saying you were not a fan of pizza...most people cant fathom such a thing. I could eat pizza at least once a week and never tire of it, but I haven't been low carbing as long as you either.

Some people have real hangups about leftovers, its not just your husband. My brother in law refuses to ever eat leftovers. We dont have that problem. We try to skip a day or three between repeating with leftovers but if I dont feel like cooking and we have last night's leftovers, neither of us are too bothered by it. We are also not weird about time in the fridge. Some people throw out leftovers after a couple days...we use the smell test...and then if it gets really long and depending on the food we may just toss it for the sake of how long its been in the fridge. But that has to get beyond a week for most foods for us. And some foods freeze OK so I sometimes do that of course.

Sounds like the zucchini is a real water problem no matter what. Might be a good reason to keep any experiments I do to a small batch until I see if I can tweak a recipe well. One thing my wife will turn her nose at...and she's not usually picky...is eggplant. Not sure why. I think all squash is pretty boring and tasteless and dont care for any of their texture...except spaghetti squash, but I force myself to eat it...especially now.

I decided to push the easy button for the reunion. I'm buying Walmart fresh meatballs (decent numbers and price), roasting them and baking them in sauce topped with cheese. I'll make a single serve version for me and the wife in case they disappear off the buffet (yes, my family reunions have a 35 foot line of foods...no one goes hungry!) that we can pull out. I dont like to eat early like most people do, so I'm usually trying to get some food as they are trying to put it all away having been out for a couple hours. If I eat at 5, I'm hungry by 9! I'm not a senior citizen yet! But my wife is! She's a decade ahead of me...a well preserved woman though, shes not a drinker like me and never put a cigarette to her lips. I'm the sex, drugs and rock and roll generation...we ruined it for everybody!

I'm going to make an italianized spice version of your focaccia, maybe two pans, one to share and one in reserve. Everyone even not on a diet that has tasted that bread, in all versions I have made...likes it. People will be bringing all kinds of breads to the reunion to go with spaghetti and lasagna, etc.. I will need something to keep my hands away from it!

Last edited by Meetow Kim : Thu, Jul-26-18 at 16:32.
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, Jul-26-18, 18:43
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Buttoni Buttoni is offline
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Ah, Ken, I see you're in Central Virginia. We lived in Hampton when I was a senior in high school and I graduated from HHS. Dad was stationed at Langley AFB's Tactical Air Command HQ. Fighter pilot his entire career. Langley was the one desk job he had and which he truly hated. But we all loved Virginia, its scenery and history. We drove many a time to Williamsburg when they charged just a nominal fee to get in. Yorktown and the plantations were always a fun weekend jaunt, too. And as a tarheel myself, we often drove to visit relatives in N.C.

I'm sure whatever you take to your reunion will be enjoyed by all.
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  #29   ^
Old Tue, Jul-31-18, 12:39
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Yes, born and raised a Virginian by West Virginian Parents. I love my state...a lot to offer from mountains to the sea. I'm most fond of where I live in the Piedmont. Lived in Northern Virginia the fist half of my life. We also have relatives in neighboring NC.

I am moving our conversation from my Lavash pizza thread to here because its way off topic for that thread and you have now created this thread which can be a catch all conversation about your recipes and more appropriate.

For those interested, Peggy and I have been conversing about various recipes and ideas over here on my Lavash Bread Pizza thread. You can catch up to our conversation there

http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthre...65&page=2&pp=15

Below is the continuation of the most recent conversation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttoni
Oh, my, I had completely forgotten about that flax-meal recipe for pepper crackers when I mentioned Black Pepper Crackers. One of my earliest cracker experiments, that one. And I did use less pepper in that first batch I created to find out how much I liked in them.

The recipe I linked above is made with almond meal and arrowroot powder and is much crispier. You really ought to try this one. They are sheer cracker Nirvana! https://buttoni.wordpress.com/2018/...wroot-crackers/ Quite crisp, too! These are so good, I've honestly never made the older recipe since I developed this recipe! I'd remove the old recipe from my site, but some still like that one, as they are seeking the various health benefits of the greater amount of flax meal. I like the texture of this recipe (linked herein) better than any of my others or any recipes of others I've tried to date. These are good eaten alone, topped with butter or used as dippers (provided the dip isn't too stiff). Give these a whirl some time. You'll LOVE the black pepper taste in them. You might even like more, but 3 tsp. was too much the time I tried that much.


Thanks Peggy,

I'll give that recipe a shot as well. I'm just about to order from Netrition, so its a good time to get the arrowroot.

I assume this is the product?

https://www2.netrition.com/cgi/advanced_search.cgi

The arrowroot starch is about the same carbs as cornstarch. What is the purpose of the arrowroot starch? Does it provide something specific for the baking process?

One thing is, the newer better recipe is about 5 times the net carbs if the cracker portion is relative to each other (.2 grams vs .93 grams). You dont provide the macros in a weight, so the best thing to do is to calculate one's own values based on the ingredients, weigh the recipe AFTER baking, then divide the total recipe net carbs by the weight in ounces or grams and multiply the per gram weight by a reasonable serving size of 30 grams (nut thins, cheese wisps and other snack crackers use something in this range). I just did that with the old recipe crackers and its a good portion size. Some crackers use 5 crackers or 16 grams...who is going to stop at 5 butter crackers?! One could stop at 5 of these old recipe black pepper crackers though, they carry a good fiber load and are dense, but still biteable.

Also, by the way, the fried chicken breader did not work as well as a baking coating (If you hadn't already tried that). It wasn't all that good with zucchini sticks, but was not bad with a boneless chicken breast, cut in half and lightly pounded out. The coating gave it a really interesting "thing" but not crunchy and seems to hold the moisture in the chicken breast well. Mine were cooked perfectly, but I also always try to cook to internal temp with breasts, stopping the cook as soon after they reach 165 as possible...the key to not overcooking and making a dry breast portion

Last edited by Meetow Kim : Tue, Jul-31-18 at 12:49.
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  #30   ^
Old Tue, Jul-31-18, 15:10
Meetow Kim Meetow Kim is offline
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Also Peggy,

I like this recipe. Looks like just your focaccia, which I'm becoming skilled at making, with cheese and meat, splitting the bread recipe in half for bottom and top.

https://buttoni.wordpress.com/2015/...uffed-focaccia/

I cant find where you instruct to use the sliced mozzarella listed as the filling. 6oz matches the 1-1/2 cups of shredded mozz and mixing the Italian seasoning with that makes sense, but no mention of the sliced cheese in the directions that I found.

I think I will make this with Italian sausage instead of the ground beef and have some no added sugar marinara either as a pour over, or a dipper...if it holds together well enough for dipping.

I notice the only difference between your Gluten-Free Grain-Free Pizza Crust and the Gluten-Free Grain-Free Focaccia is the yeast...and 5 years apart posting on the blog. Was the yeast just a new discovery as you went along or is there a reason to not use the yeast when using the recipe for pizza dough?
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