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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Sep-14-11, 11:38
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Would you be better off eating like a caveman?

Interesting interview with a Paleo nutritionist ...

Quote:
Jess Mullen: The Paleo Diet

Dave is intrigued by the idea behind the Paleo Diet, where people only eat things our Stone Age ancestors might have hunted or gathered. We talk with Jess Mullen, a Nutritionist at Crossfit Seattle. She has been adhering to the Paleo Diet for a couple of years and explains how it works.

http://mynorthwest.com/?nid=577&a=33417&p=&n=AudioClip
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Sep-14-11, 11:42
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default Paleo enthusiasts turn the "caveman diet" into a lifestyle

Quote:
September 15, 2011

Paleo enthusiasts turn the "caveman diet" into a lifestyle

If there's something strange about reverting to the way of your ancestors and throwing inordinately heavy objects around Tower Grove Park, neither Alex Born nor the other six people wielding 10- to 30-pound weights on this Tuesday evening can see it. And maybe, just maybe, there really isn't anything weird here: What they're doing is going back — think caveman far back — in history for both today's workout and the lifestyle behind it. What's so odd about that?

Right now, however, they're being reprimanded by a park security guard, who appears uninspired by their reckless abandon.

"Don't do that anymore," he says with a dramatic shake of his head. "You can't just throw things around the park."

OK, so maybe it is a little weird.

The seven-person crew is divided into teams: "hunters" and "gatherers." For about fifteen minutes, they vie to see which team can toss the awkward weights the greatest number of times before succumbing to exhaustion and moving on to the next task. To the victor goes, well, nothing — other than the knowledge that they worked out the hardest.

But what might appear to be seven rogue nut jobs is actually a small contingent of Primal Living STL. And that group's 87 members are a proud part of a larger picture, a lifestyle devoted to the practice of the "Paleolithic," or "primal," diet. Defined only by its strictest intentions, the diet calls on an informed knowledge of how pre-Homo sapiens ate roughly 2.5 million years ago. The goal here is that 80 percent of the food followers consume should be something their predecessors might have picked up, brushed off and ingested: grass-fed meat, vegetables, fruits, nuts.

The list of forbidden foods is longer: Dairy products, sugar, salt, processed oils and even grains and legumes are off-limits. Although Born, the group's Tuesday workout leader, insists it's possible to eat out on the paleo diet, the menu item he suggests is a salad — and even that requires removing a few ingredients.

Though informed by anthropology and practically obsessed with the concept of evolution, the diet is a tough sell, he admits.

Still, "we find in the records that humans were biggest and more robust before the dawn of agriculture," Born says. "Anthropologists have always known what we should eat. Scientists only recently got it wrong."

The paleo diet is by no means new. It gained early attention through the recommendations of a gastroenterologist in 1975 and saw its popularity rise in the '90s.

What's worth noting today, however, is the fervor with which it has been reappropriated. It no longer fits comfortably inside the category of "diet"; it's a lifestyle. Those who adhere to the diet's strictest tenets become almost religious about the ideas behind it. Today, joining can including buying a "primal living" cookbook, subscribing to the newly launched Paleo Magazine and joining one of the dozens of "Primal Lifestyle" groups on Meetup .com, of which the St. Louis branch is one.

Usually, interest in eating paleo-style starts with a different diet gone wrong. Born, his fellow workout leader Michael Libbie and a handful of other group members began their path to paleo through a similar diet called the Zone, which concentrates on food proportion over food quality. Many of the group's members, its instructors included, are also devotees of CrossFit training, a hardy brand of physical conditioning. That interest makes the birth of their paleo fixation a kind of a chicken-or-the-gym situation. Usually, either CrossFit training leads you to the paleo diet, or you use CrossFit to supplement the paleo diet once you start practicing it.

"The typical reaction is that people think it's pretty crackpot because of how much fat we eat," Libbie says. "Since the standard conventional wisdom since the '60s is to eat a low-fat diet, it has permeated everyone's consciousness to the point that it's gospel. The resistance we get is, 'Ewww, you eat all that fat?'"

Yes, you do. And, for a while, most members concede, you cheat. "There are days when I'll walk down to Schnucks and buy six donuts and eat them," Libbie says. "As time goes on, though, I do it less and less."

For Born, cheating on the diet recently meant ingesting trail mix, an action that he is more ashamed of than seems strictly warranted. (The mix, after all, was mostly nuts.) Another sign things are veering into lifestyle territory: Several of the group's members admit they look into other carts at the grocery store to see whether the shoppers might be secret paleo followers. Without fail, a carton of ice cream will destroy that curiosity.

One of the group's members is a former vegetarian. (The tension here rises: Vegetarians hate the paleo diet's reliance on fatty meat.) But she adopted the lifestyle to aid her health problems. Her story has since become popular inside the group, as her severe depression cleared when she progressed through the ranks.

Members say it can help with other ailments, too. Libbie, who is tall, lean, sweaty, tattooed and shirtless for this workout session, claims a slight drop in body fat.

"We're really focused on avoiding the diseases of civilization," he says. "We use the term 'diseases of civilization' to refer to at least three prominent conditions: type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Our Paleolithic predecessors never had those issues." (No one inside the group challenges such claims by pointing out how much we have yet to learn about said predecessors.)

The degree to which you adapt the principles of the caveman lifestyle to your daily routine becomes important. Some go all the way. For two months now, Born has slept on a flat bed he built from lumber and bamboo purchased at Lowe's. And though it's hard to look past his whistle, he's currently wearing Vibram FiveFingers, glorified foot gloves that are about as close to the barefoot caveman aesthetic as you can get without actually being barefoot.

"I sleep on a flat surface because the people who live in Third World countries do that and have been doing it for a long time," Born says. "They don't have back problems, and reasons like this are probably why. It's only recently that life became so complicated, and we needed all of these extra things."

The last remaining link in the chain of St. Louis enthusiasts reenvisioning the diet as a large-scale lifestyle is simply the need for more links. And that's the hardest part. It's tough to convince people to shirk modern conventions and adopt a diet that can be roughly 50 percent fat — much less to do so while name-dropping cavemen like a Geico pitchman.

"I've found that the more advice I give people, the quicker they just refuse it," Libbie says. "It's not helpful to say, 'Try this instead of what you've been doing your whole life.' I know it sounds crazy, but I also know it worked for me, which makes it harder that I have no idea how to make it work for you."

In the meantime, those who have already been converted are cracking post-workout jokes even as they struggle to breathe without panting. There's a joke about how one dieter shouldn't have eaten so much fat before the workout. There's a one-liner about spears, which early humans used to throw around, much like the weights now spread across the grass. There's some cackling, followed by the collection of those weights and the search to identify and claim the bikes they rode in on.

"Holy crap, who had this weight?" asks a member, who has picked up what is easily the most awkward piece. "This is almost Neanderthal."
http://www.riverfronttimes.com/2011...c-diet-cavemen/
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 13:52
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default Against the grain, 'caveman' diet gains traction

Quote:
AFP
September 15, 2011


Against the grain, 'caveman' diet gains traction

Could Paleolithic man hold the key to today's nutrition problems?

A growing number of adherents to the so-called "caveman" diet contend that a return to the hunter-gatherer foods of the Stone Age -- heavy on meats, devoid of most grains -- could alleviate problems like obesity, type 2 diabetes and many coronary problems.

The Paleo diet movement is backed by some academics and fitness gurus, and has gained some praise in medical research in the US and elsewhere even though it goes against recommendations of most mainstream nutritionists and government guidelines.

Loren Cordain, a professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University, said he believes millions in the United States and elsewhere are following the Paleo diet movement, based on sales of books such as his own and Internet trends.

"It was an obscure idea 10 years ago, and in the last two to three years it has become known worldwide," Cordain, one the leading academics backing the Paleo diet, told AFP.

"There are at least a half-dozen books on the best seller list that are promoting this," he added.

The underlying basis for the Stone Age diet is a belief that homo sapiens evolved into modern humans with a hunter-gatherer diet that promoted brain function and overall health. Backers say the human genome is essentially unchanged from the end of the Paleolithic era 10,000 years ago after evolving over millions of years.

"It's intuitive," Cordain said. "Obviously you can't feed meat to a horse, you can't feed hay to a cat. The reason for that is that their genes were shaped in different ecological niches."

He said peer-reviewed research has shown the Paleo diet better than the Mediterranean diet, US government recommendations and diets aimed at controlling adult diabetes.

One study published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology showed a Paleolithic diet "improved glycemic control and several cardiovascular risk factors compared to a diabetes diet."

A Swedish study published in the Journal Nutrition and Metabolism found that a Stone Age diet is "more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet," making it something to be considered in fighting obesity.

Some aspects of the Paleo diet are widely accepted, such as shunning many refined and processed starches and sugars in favor of fresh fruits, nuts and vegetables. But the controversy stems from its elimination of most cereals, legumes and dairy products, relying instead on high-protein meats, fish and eggs.

The Paleo diet has a devoted following, some who link it to improved fitness and longevity, including Arthur De Vany, a 74-year-old former economics professor who promotes vigorous workouts and wrote a 2010 book, "The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging."

"Our forager ancestors sought out high-energy (meaning high-calorie, high-fat) foods that could be obtained at the lowest energy cost," De Vany says in his book.

"We began getting heavier and developing new diseases once we ceased to be hunter-gatherers and instead became farmers -- or more specifically once we started eating the food we grow rather than gathering food."

But a US News survey of nutritionists ranked the Paleo diet last among 20 possible options, far below the Mediterranean, vegan or Weight Watchers diets.

It noted that the Paleo diet gets 23 percent of calories from carbohydrates compared to 45 to 65 percent in US government recommendations, and that the Stone Age regime is higher than recommended for protein and fat.

"While its focus on veggies and lean meat is admirable, experts couldn't get past the fact that entire food groups, like dairy and grains, are excluded on Paleo diets," US News said.

Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, told AFP that the Paleo diet "would not be appropriate for today's sedentary lifestyles."

Nestle and others also dispute some of the historical claims of Paleo diet advocates. "The claim that half the calories in the Paleolithic diet came from meat is difficult to confirm," she said.

In a research paper, Nestle said the life expectancy of Stone Age man was around 25 years "suggesting that the Paleolithic diet, among other life conditions, must have been considerably less than ideal."

Cordain argues however that there are modern societies of hunter-gatherers where the theory can be tested.

In these societies, "elderly people have been shown to be generally free of the signs and symptoms of chronic disease (obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels) that universally afflict the elderly in Western societies," he says on his blog.

"When these people adopt Western diets, their health declines and they begin to exhibit signs and symptoms of 'diseases of civilization.'"

Cordain acknowledges that because of the way society has evolved, it is impractical to feed the world with Paleo diets because many societies have become dependent on cereals.

But he says it can be successfully used in many Western countries, and argues that despite jokes about the Stone Age, mainstream nutritionists will come around to his conclusions.

"This is not a fad, this is not Fred Flintstone, this is the wave of the future," he said.
http://www.google.com/hostednews/af...315ce765b0a.251
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 14:04
marilyn.b marilyn.b is offline
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Default

Quote:
Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, told AFP that the Paleo diet "would not be appropriate for today's sedentary lifestyles."

HUH??? It's not like you have to go out and actually kill anything.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 14:25
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Angeline Angeline is offline
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Well, you know, why read past the first sentence, when that tells you everything you need to know ? I mean it's not like she is a public figure who is getting quoted by a journalist. <sarcasm>
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 15:04
BigBenny BigBenny is offline
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I think people seem to believe that paleo man was active often..No species in the wild burns more calories than they have to except the young ones (playing). I'd be willing to bet that paleo man was also lazy as heck when they weren't hunting, and it's not like gathering would have required a lot of energy
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 18:50
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GlendaRC GlendaRC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBenny
I think people seem to believe that paleo man was active often..No species in the wild burns more calories than they have to except the young ones (playing). I'd be willing to bet that paleo man was also lazy as heck when they weren't hunting, and it's not like gathering would have required a lot of energy

Especially not for the men ... I've always understood that, judging by more modern hunter-gatherer societies, men did the hunting, women did the gathering. I think women also did the work of preparing the meat for preservation.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Sep-15-11, 21:51
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jmh jmh is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBenny
I think people seem to believe that paleo man was active often..No species in the wild burns more calories than they have to except the young ones (playing). I'd be willing to bet that paleo man was also lazy as heck when they weren't hunting, and it's not like gathering would have required a lot of energy



Yeah I think humans are more like lions - stuff their faces then sleep all day (and have lots of sex! LOL).

Farming is real hard work though.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Sep-16-11, 03:39
howlovely howlovely is offline
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When anyone tells you that the life expectancy of Paleo man was 25, they are not being entirely accurate. That number is low because half the people died before the age of 5.

There is NO WAY IN HELL human beings could have flourished if people routinely only lived to be 25. That is absurd. Same goes for the middles ages. The life expectancy then was also 25, for the same reason as earlier: half the people died in early childhood. Also, lots of women died in childbirth.

If you made it to 20 in both eras, you could reasonably EXPECT to make it to middle age. Finally, the life expectancy from these times had almost nothing to do with nutrition or diet.

Not one nutritionist who cites this fact backs it up with any sort of decent argument. They never say, "These people had a life expectancy of 25 because they ate (horrors!) red meat and no healthy whole grains." Nope. They never say that. It is just a scare tactic.

Oh, and BTW, life expectancy in Ancient Rome and the Middle Ages was similiar to that of the Stone Age, when the Romans and Medieval Europeans ate a diet heavy in grain. If you throw that little factoid into the mix, then you can completely negate these imbeciles' pseudo-argument.

The whole life expectancy thing is simply a bad argument when it comes to what to eat. There are way too many variables to consider. Think of a poor African country with a life expectancy of 40. Could anyone really, honestly argue that their life expectancy is so low because they eat too much meat and not enough grain? Get real.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Sep-16-11, 06:24
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girlgerms girlgerms is offline
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I think a lot of theory is just being retro-fitted to fit in with why certain foods are good/bad for us.
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Sep-16-11, 22:04
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Voo36 Voo36 is offline
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Now that is interesting! Thanks for sharing

I've often wondered if a person could eat our modern fast-food diet and not gain weight... IF they had to kill a cow, grind the meat, raise and grind the grain, and raise a garden full of tomatoes, lettuce and cucumbers
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Old Sat, Sep-17-11, 06:22
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girlgerms girlgerms is offline
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Yep, I agree, I have found many paleos very religious about it, aint that ironic?!
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Old Sun, Sep-18-11, 06:45
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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People are always looking for something to join. This is the popularity of cults of all kinds; a framework to fit oneself into that answers all your questions.

While I am subject to great bursts of enthusiasm myself, I've never been prone to just plugging myself into someone else's framework. But some people love not having the responsibility of figuring out their own life.

That's where I place such all encompassing obsessions; gee, I eat Primal, but no one will pry my computer from my hands...
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  #14   ^
Old Fri, Sep-30-11, 09:54
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Demi Demi is offline
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Default I, Caveman

Quote:
Airing at 7 p.m. Sunday on the Discovery Channel as part of its “Curiosity” series:

I, Caveman

5 Reasons to Follow a Caveman DietWhat happens when 10 people spend 10 days living the lifestyle of cavemen and cavewomen? And how can a Paleolithic foraging life be beneficial to your health?

http://curiosity.discovery.com/topi...man-episode.htm


Quote:
Stanford physician brings modern medicine to the late Stone Age

Grant Lipman, MD, an emergency medicine physician at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, recently provided medical care to cavemen.

As an expert in wilderness medicine, he was particularly well-suited for the job of treating members of a 10-person clan — six men and four women — who hunted with stone weapons and wore animal skins last summer in a remote patch of wilderness in the southern Rocky Mountains.

OK — truth be told, they weren’t really cavemen. They were participants in what was essentially a filmed social experiment to determine how modern-day people would fare if they had to live like their ancestors did 20,000 years ago. Lipman provides on-screen commentary for the television show chronicling the group’s experience.

“I, Caveman” is scheduled to air from 8-10 p.m. Oct. 2 on the Discovery Channel. It is the final installment of the network’s Curiosity series.

Lipman, who is also a clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine, has previously served as medical director for high-altitude climbing expeditions and ultra-marathons across deserts in Egypt, China, Chile and Antarctica.

He was initially contacted by the show’s creators to be a commentator. He then suggested it might be prudent if he also served as the project’s medical director. “You had a 50-member crew filming people who would be exhausted and hunting wild animals with prehistoric weapons at high altitudes,” Lipman said.

The production team was keen on keeping everyone safe and healthy, he said, and quickly took him up on his offer. As it turned out, he had plenty of opportunities to ply his trade.

In one case, the most skilled hunter in the group badly cut his hand — his throwing hand, for that matter — while fashioning an obsidian spear tip. The cut got infected, and Lipman had to intervene with some antibiotics. Others suffered from mild hypothermia, altitude sickness and, in one case, acute bronchitis, which he closely monitored. “It could have led to high-altitude pulmonary edema” — a life-threatening condition in which fluid builds up in the lungs, he said. In another case, a cavewoman partially dislocated a rib, which he had to realign.

“Even though my patients were cavemen, they got the highest standard of modern medical care,” he said. However, he added that to treat altitude sickness, which he described as feeling like a bad hangover, he had patients chew on willow root, a natural analgesic.

He also attended to production crew members, several of whom suffered from mild hypothermia, altitude sickness, twisted ankles and leech (yes, leech) wounds.

Wildnerness medicine, Lipman explained, is “the application of emergency medicine using limited resources and improvisation in an austere environment at least two hours away from definitive medical care.”

In addition to Lipman, Stanford boasts an unusual concentration of wilderness-medicine specialists, including Paul Auerbach, MD, considered the foremost living expert in the field. (His Wilderness Medicine, which Lipman described as the discipline’s bible, is soon coming out in its sixth edition.) Robert Norris, MD, chief of emergency medicine at Stanford, is one of the world’s leading authorities on venomous bites and stings. Lipman is associate director of Stanford’s wilderness medicine fellowship. When the program launched in 2003, it was the first in the nation.

The “I, Caveman” participants were selected for skills and temperaments that might come in useful in the wilderness at 9,000 feet above sea level, with nothing more than some animal-skin clothing, a makeshift shelter and a two-day supply of water.

“We wanted to ask, ‘Were people better off as cavemen?’ How would our lives work without all the material stuff we depend on today?” said Alan Eyres, an executive producer at the Discovery Channel. “What would happen if you stripped people of their Blackberries and their Internet connections and put them in the Upper Paleolithic? It was designed and cast a little bit like a reality TV show, but 25 percent smarter.”

In addition to Lipman, the show features an archaeologist, a nutritionist and a survival expert to provide commentary on the participants’ struggles. The host and narrator is Morgan Spurlock, best known as the director and star of the docudrama Super Size Me.

Lipman spent much of the film shoot locating good places to land a helicopter and fast routes down the mountain in case of an emergency. On his way by car to the shoot location, he stopped by a fire station to see whether he could get an oxygen cylinder, an item he had been unable to bring with him to Colorado because of airline safety rules. He ended up trading some firefighters a case of beer for one. “Improvisation is a cornerstone of wilderness medicine,” he said.
http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2011/se...vemen-0929.html


Quote:
From Rob Wolf's blog:

I-CAVEMAN!

Looks like I’ve finally been given clearance to tell y’all about the project I did back in the summer. I participated in a Discovery Channel show that is part of the Curiosity Series called I-CaveMan. Here is a description my friend Lora wrote about the show on her Facebook page:

Episode 1 – Were we better off as cavemen? Morgan Spurlock (“Super Size Me”) joins nine ordinary men and women in an attempt to survive in the wild using only stone-age technology. Cold, dehydration, and hunger threaten to derail the experiment from the start.

Episode 2 – The group continues their experiment to live in the wild. Hunger and deprivation push the group to the brink of failure. Can a successful elk hunt save them?

I can’t say much yet other than it was a very intense experience and there will be some interesting inferences made about the whole paleo concept including the health benefits of an ancestral diet and life-way. The show is slated to run Oct 2nd from 8-10PM, but check local listings.

http://robbwolf.com/2011/09/23/i-caveman/

Last edited by Demi : Fri, Sep-30-11 at 09:59.
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Sep-30-11, 10:49
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Angeline Angeline is offline
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It should prove interesting, but I don't like the question it poses. Would we be better off as cavemen. That's silly. You just have to look at some of the remaning hunter gatherer tribes to answer that question. At least they are thoroughly adapted to their environment. I can't say the same about a bunch of city slickers playing caveman re-enactment. Anyway, I think the answer to that question would be yes and no. Some aspects of life was better and some not.
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