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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-06, 20:58
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa N
Could be. Whenver I get a blood draw, I ask them to use paper tape since the adhesive on regular bandages gives me a nasty rash that takes a few days to clear up and itches like mad.
Make sure that you stay well-hydrated (extra water) and watch out for sugar cravings during the first 72 hours or so while your body is detoxing from the nicotine; the extra water will help your body clear the nicotine out quicker and also help your liver and kidneys work at their best.
You may feel a bit brain-fogged and tired for a bit as well while your brain is getting used to functioning without that regular nicotine hit; within 2 weeks that should be gone as well.


OK, so I'm not wanted in 7 states for aggressive behavior/violent crimes. That has to be good.

Yeah, I didn't know if it was the adhesive or the nicotine. Made me raw. I've not had problem with tape otherwise, but then I dont' think I've ever worn any for the time I'd wear the patches (which I can't recall the timetable). T

You are SO right on the water. I'm bad at that anyway and really need the kick in the pants. Will do. I'm also bloating from TOM, so the water should be helpful all the way around.

Have been foggy and tired, but I was chalking it up to the TOM stuff. Maybe it's a combo thing. Appetite was pretty much shot all day due to cramping, but then kicked in this evening. Only wanting something sweet. Detox? TOM? Both? I dont' think I care, just want to get thru it without hurting myself too much.

Thank you again on the water tip. Something I really should know and be doing anyway!
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  #17   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-06, 21:01
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelica
You know, quitting cold turkey, it hasnt been as difficult as I would have imagined. Its all got to do with how bad you want it. I attempted to quit before, I started with the patches, which say you can wear them overnight, but should be removed if you have 'vivid' dreams. Vivid is an understatement, I've never EVER had a dream feel so real, it was, incredible, and terrible, as it happened to be a nightmare, and not some nice dream about me and a handsome young man - anyway, back to my point, I say ditch all the patches and other stop smoking BS, everything is a business, including health

Anyway, its day 23 for me keep going guys, and dont be too hard on yourself if you slip up


WAY TO GO!!!!! Keep the good news coming, I need to hear it!

I tried the patch and never had the dream problem. Probably because I couldn't get a deep enough sleep due to the itching the patch caused. I have to go with you on ditching all the gum and patch stuff. Allen Carr makes a point that it made no sense to him that the gum or patch is used till the "habit" is lost when smoking is not a habit but an addiction. Sure, but it's an individual thing. For me, I jsut have to do it all, all the way.
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  #18   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-06, 21:07
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by donnamoon
Yeah, I think it all depends on the individuals. My husband is quitting too and agrees about the NRT but I am a teacher and I can't really handle the ups and downs of cold turkey in my opinion in this kind of job. The patch seems to be helping me to gradually get rid of the whole habit and not go from 20 cigs of nicotine to 0 nicotine plus all the physical habit,mental habit, psychological habit breaking etc. in one day. For individuals who kind of need moderation it helps. It's working for me, so far so good. :-) I do hate the sticky, itchy arm though. :-(

Donna



I can't remember how long the patch thing is supposed to go, and how it incrementally goes down. But, yeah, I can see how you'd be eager to want to keep your cool when slowing down to ceasing. How long have you been on them? (Not in minutes, just days please ) I was working when I used the patch and I don't know what I would've been like without them. But my skin just couldn't hang with the program.

BTW, I do recommend Carr's book if you can track it. I found it at Barnes&Noble for ~ $15.

I'm excited that you are quitting too. We're both doing OK. I think we'll make it. So far, I've had urges, but nothing mind scrambling. I really REALLY want this, for ME. The thought of stinking of an ashtray and my workouts being affected are real motivators. I'm pretty confidence, if not joyful, at this point.
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  #19   ^
Old Fri, Nov-03-06, 00:20
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Was in the grocery store today. It wasn't till I'd been back home for an hour or so before I realized that I hadn't bought smokes out of "habit". YAY! It's not so bad. Really. Actually, this is remarkably simple. And to think I'm doing this with PMS and the husband still came home. Cool. Oh, and he'd been home over 2 hours before I remembered to tell him about not getting anything at the store. Completely forgot, again.
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  #20   ^
Old Fri, Nov-03-06, 15:19
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
Posts: 12,028
 
Plan: Bernstein Diabetes Soluti
Stats: 260/-/145 Female 5' 3"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Michigan
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Jande, it's as simple as never taking another puff. Then again, simple doesn't always mean easy.
Good on you for keeping your quit!
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  #21   ^
Old Fri, Nov-03-06, 15:45
boopiee's Avatar
boopiee boopiee is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 70
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 215/205/150 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 15%
Location: Martinez, GA
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Did you guys know that cigarettes are more addictive than heroin??? No wonder it's so hard to quit, and I applaud anyone who tries. It is a very hard thing to kick.
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  #22   ^
Old Fri, Nov-03-06, 16:43
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
Posts: 12,028
 
Plan: Bernstein Diabetes Soluti
Stats: 260/-/145 Female 5' 3"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boopiee
Did you guys know that cigarettes are more addictive than heroin??? No wonder it's so hard to quit, and I applaud anyone who tries. It is a very hard thing to kick.


I think it's important to qualify what that means exactly when it is said that nicotine is as addictive or more addictive than heroin. What mostly is referred to is the amount of exposure to the chemical needed before physical addiction occurs and with nicotine, that is very little, just at it is with heroin.
OTOH, symptoms of withdrawal from heroin are much more severe than they are for nicotine, often requiring medical supervision in the hospital to assure that seizures or cardiac arrest do not occur.
Symptoms of withdrawal from nicotine involve mild anxiety and that's pretty much it; quitting nicotine is a cakewalk compared to what some drug addicts have to go through to get free.
When it's said that nicotine is just as addictive as heroin, it's true but that was never intended to be an indication of how physically difficult it is to break that addiction or used as an excuse to not make the attempt.
Yup...we're addicts but thank God I didn't have to endure what a heroin addict goes though to break my addiction.
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  #23   ^
Old Fri, Nov-03-06, 22:13
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa N
Yup...we're addicts but thank God I didn't have to endure what a heroin addict goes though to break my addiction.


For those who have quit, are in the midst, or and planning on it . . . this REALLY puts things into perspective. By comparison, what I'm "dealing with" is NOTHING.
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  #24   ^
Old Sun, Nov-05-06, 10:16
boopiee's Avatar
boopiee boopiee is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 70
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 215/205/150 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 15%
Location: Martinez, GA
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Mentally, I believe I did endure everything a heroin addict would endure. It was hard, very hard... but as time went by it got easier and easier.

Congrats to all who are trying, have tried, or have kicked the habit.
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  #25   ^
Old Wed, Nov-08-06, 14:47
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Still no smokes, and I'm holding at 135. Have to admit, I really didn't expect THAT to happen!
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  #26   ^
Old Wed, Nov-08-06, 16:52
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
Posts: 12,028
 
Plan: Bernstein Diabetes Soluti
Stats: 260/-/145 Female 5' 3"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Michigan
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You're doing, great JAnde!
Pat yourself on the back; you've made it past the hardest part. Now you need to be on guard against mental triggers; situations and emotions in which you used to smoke before. The good news about those is that you only need to refuse to reward the trigger with nicotine once to break its power over you. The hard part is recognizing the trigger for what it is. Physical cravings should be pretty much a thing of the past now so any craving you do experience is likely a mental trigger.
It really helped me to tell myself when I had a craving like that, "I used to smoke in this situation, but I'm chosing not to now".
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, Nov-09-06, 05:08
jande2211 jande2211 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,631
 
Plan: Atkins/M&E
Stats: 165/127.1/115 Female 63"
BF:
Progress: 76%
Default

Lisa, thanks for the cheers! If that was the hardest part, then it really wasn't so bad. That or I'm tougher than I give myself credit for.

I get what you're saying about triggers. Now, physically, there's still something going on. Yesterday afternoon, I was making LC cupcakes to celebrate our 20th anniversary and, out of the blue, I was wanting a smoke pretty bad. Husband just happened to call and I was able to talk to him about it and got thru it. Nothing physically since.

Emotionally? Well, that's different. My cat of 16 years is dying and it hurts and it would be so easy to make myself believe that one smoke wouldn't hurt, that I just need the break. But then I tell myself, yeah like smoking will really help this sweet dear friend. Boy, the excuses I can come up with to get one hit, eh.
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, Nov-09-06, 19:28
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
Posts: 12,028
 
Plan: Bernstein Diabetes Soluti
Stats: 260/-/145 Female 5' 3"
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: Michigan
Default

Wanting to smoke isn't necessarily a physical craving; emotional and mental triggers can provoke an urge to smoke every bit as powerful as any physical craving can. The fact that they often catch us off guard makes them even more difficult to resist but good on you for doing just that!
Triggers can be something as simple as a smell (like those baking goodies) or emotions, both positive and negative, a time of day or even seeing/talking to a former smoking buddy.
Be on your guard and have a plan for dealing with those sudden urges like calling someone or taking a walk.
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  #29   ^
Old Thu, Nov-09-06, 20:05
dougerry dougerry is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 25
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 155/145/135 Female 62 inches
BF:
Progress:
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the way i quit was to make one room in the house my smoking room, there was nothing there but 2 chairs. i pretended my doctor was sitting on the opposite chair watching me light up. it worked for me 5 years ago and all i do now is feel so sorry for the people that are still smoking. i did for 40 years. gerry
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