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  #331   ^
Old Sun, Nov-15-20, 00:50
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Dame Sally Davies: obesity scourge led to 50,000 Covid death toll

Former health chief claims the failure to address the crisis of overeating and cheap junk food has caused extra fatalities


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...-toll-c9r5bsnps

Quote:
Thousands of coronavirus deaths could have been avoided if ministers had tackled the obesity crisis, England’s former chief medical officer says today.

Professor Dame Sally Davies blames the country’s high death toll on “a structural environment” that enabled junk food makers to encourage consumption.

The UK has one of the highest rates of obesity in the world and the second highest in Europe, with nearly one in three adults obese. Obesity, defined as a body mass index greater than 30, raises the risk of dying of Covid-19 by 48%.

Last week Britain became the first country in Europe to pass a grim milestone, reaching more than 50,000 deaths from the coronavirus on official figures.

Davies said: “There is a direct correlation between obesity and a high mortality for Covid, and I’m highlighting that, as a nation, one of the reasons we have a problem with our weight ... is because of our structural environment to which advertising, portion size, and many other things come into play.”

In June, Boris Johnson admitted that Britons were Europe’s fattest people bar the Maltese. He recognised his own need to lose weight after requiring intensive care for Covid in April.

He said: “I have taken a very libertarian stance on obesity but actually when you look at the numbers, when you look at the pressure on the NHS, compare, I’m afraid, this wonderful country of ours to other European countries, we are significantly fatter than most others, apart from the Maltese ... It is an issue.”

Health experts hoped the prime minister’s brush with death would lead to action. A “war against fat” was announced, but with little effect. Last week new government proposals suggested online ads containing food high in fat, sugar and salt could be banned.

Davies today issues a call for the NHS to focus on prevention as much as being “an illness service”.

It includes a demand for food companies to “play or pay”, meaning they must play their part in encouraging healthier eating or pay an annual levy to fund an expanded health service.

During her nine years as chief medical officer, Davies faced criticism for seeking “sin taxes” and laws to clamp down on unhealthy foods and smoking. Ministers acted on some of her appeals.

Davies, who stepped down in October last year — to be succeeded by Chris Whitty — said Covid’s devastating effect on the unhealthy had proved her correct.

She told Times Radio’s G&T programme: “You only have to look at our prime minister, who believes his weight was one of the reasons his episode of Covid was quite serious.

“We know if we were slimmer as a nation, and smoked less, we would have less [Covid] morbidity and mortality.”

She added: “We accept commercial companies nannying people into eating or drinking or smoking unhealthily. But we don’t accept that we as a nation working together should nudge people and put the same effort and money into nudging people for health. We need a structural system where it’s easy to be healthy.”

Davies, who is master of Trinity College, Cambridge, was damning about successive governments’ failure to prepare the NHS properly for a pandemic.

“We have been found wanting. We could and should have done better. We should have maintained the health of our public better, but if [you] look at comparisons, we also have fewer doctors per bed than other comparable countries, fewer intensive care beds, fewer ventilators. Our NHS has delivered really well, but we left it without a resilience. We needed more resilience,” said Davies who has wrritten a book on the problem, Who’s Health Is It Anyway?, co-authored with the epidemiologist Dr Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard and published this week.

Covid had revealed stark health inequalities. “If there’s one thing the British public care about, it’s fairness.”

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  #332   ^
Old Sun, Nov-15-20, 02:53
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Ambulo Ambulo is offline
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I really hope the bok is not called "Who's Health is it Anyway?" . Anyone who can't master simple grammar has lost me from the outset. As usual demonizing fat and salt. I dread government nudging us towards the mainstream blueprint of "healthy eating". More carbs, less fat.
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  #333   ^
Old Sun, Nov-15-20, 04:49
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulo
I really hope the bok is not called "Who's Health is it Anyway?" . Anyone who can't master simple grammar has lost me from the outset. As usual demonizing fat and salt. I dread government nudging us towards the mainstream blueprint of "healthy eating". More carbs, less fat.

Dame Sally got the title right, but head copy editor at The Times needs to throw away spell-checker!
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  #334   ^
Old Tue, Nov-17-20, 07:28
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Anyone on the Dr Fung mailing list would have received this, parts copied here:

Quote:
In a new book, called The Immunity Fix, Dr. James DiNicolantonio , a leading U.S. cardiovascular research scientist and doctor of pharmacy, lays out simple strategies for supporting the immune system.

Here is what he had to say in an exclusive interview.

“In the United States, 88% of adults are metabolically unhealthy. In fact, having metabolic syndrome, has been found to increase the risk of dying from COVID by 3.5-fold and ending up in the ICU by 4.5-fold!”

So, what leads to poor metabolic health? A diet high in sugar!
Consuming a diet high in refined carbohydrates and sugar leads to insulin resistance, which elevates blood glucose, blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference. All known risk factors for worse COVID-19 outcomes.

Is there anything else that you can do besides cutting out the refined carbs and sugar? --> Yes!

You can improve your nutrient status. At least 90% of Americans are deficient in 1 or more vitamins or minerals:
23 million Americans have severe vitamin D deficiency, which increases the risk of having a poor COVID-19 outcome by more than 6-fold and the risk of dying from COVID-19 by nearly 15-fold!
Many Americans are not getting the recommended dietary amount of vitamin K, magnesium, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin C. All of these nutrients are important for a properly functioning immune system.
Populations that have poor selenium status are at a 3-fold higher risk of having a bad COVID-19 outcome and a 5-fold higher risk of dying. And it’s been estimated that around 40% of people in the U.S. are selenium deficient and 15% of Americans not getting the recommended dietary intake of selenium each day.
Patients with COVID-19 also have significantly low zinc levels compared to healthy controls. In fact, zinc deficiency more than doubles the risk of having a poor COVID-19 outcome and prolongs hospital stay by more than 2 days. And it’s been estimated that around 47% of U.S. adults are deficient in zinc with 42% of U.S. adults not getting the recommended dietary intake of zinc.

Thus, when it comes to COVID-19, it is clear we want optimal metabolic health and nutrient status if we want to have a better chance for a positive outcome.

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Nov-17-20 at 08:31.
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  #335   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 12:11
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Demi Demi is offline
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Have just picked this up from Dr Aseem Malhotra:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Aseem Malhotra

Peer reviewed 160 country study reveals more stringent lockdown measures NOT associated with decreased mortality

Poor metabolic health THE major issue

‘improve prevention strategies by increasing population resilience—better physical fitness & immunity’ write authors

YES! Covid-19 is a diet related disease. Why does EVERYONE not know this ?? Because we have Big Food & Bad Pharma corporations controlling the narrative, media and public health messaging as they’ve done for years
Quote:
Covid-19 Mortality: A Matter of Vulnerability Among Nations Facing Limited Margins of Adaptation

Context: The human development territories have been severely constrained under the Covid-19 pandemic. A common dynamics has been observed, but its propagation has not been homogeneous over each continent. We aimed at characterizing the non-viral parameters that were most associated with death rate.

Methods: We tested major indices from five domains (demography, public health, economy, politics, environment) and their potential associations with Covid-19 mortality during the first 8 months of 2020, through a Principal Component Analysis and a correlation matrix with a Pearson correlation test. Data of all countries, or states in federal countries, showing at least 10 fatality cases, were retrieved from official public sites. For countries that have not yet finished the first epidemic phase, a prospective model has been computed to provide options of death rates evolution.

Results: Higher Covid death rates are observed in the [25/65°] latitude and in the [−35/−125°] longitude ranges. The national criteria most associated with death rate are life expectancy and its slowdown, public health context (metabolic and non-communicable diseases (NCD) burden vs. infectious diseases prevalence), economy (growth national product, financial support), and environment (temperature, ultra-violet index). Stringency of the measures settled to fight pandemia, including lockdown, did not appear to be linked with death rate.

Conclusion: Countries that already experienced a stagnation or regression of life expectancy, with high income and NCD rates, had the highest price to pay. This burden was not alleviated by more stringent public decisions. Inherent factors have predetermined the Covid-19 mortality: understanding them may improve prevention strategies by increasing population resilience through better physical fitness and immunity.

https://www.frontiersin.org/article...Xis8iDZ_7Gev Q
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  #336   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 16:16
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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As forDr Malhoutras statement.... How TRUE. Yet our own government would need to be liable for the current food plate and push 300 carbs a day theme.

Perhaps we all need to reach out to every representative and senator in the US. And dr Fauci !!!!! Until their is a vaccine, having the best possible immune system is the first defense.
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  #337   ^
Old Tue, Nov-24-20, 10:39
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Dr. Sanjay Gupta, on "Why losing weight might protect you from CoVid-19"

https://www.cnn.com/videos/health/2...sk-orig-llr.cnn
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  #338   ^
Old Tue, Nov-24-20, 12:53
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doreen T doreen T is offline
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Off-topic posts have been removed, per our covid-19 discussion policy. Yes folks, it's still in effect .

Thanks for understanding, and let's please keep topics relevant to low-carbing, obesity and nutrition.


Doreen
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  #339   ^
Old Thu, Nov-26-20, 09:23
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen T
Off-topic posts have been removed, per our covid-19 discussion policy. Yes folks, it's still in effect .

Thanks for understanding, and let's please keep topics relevant to low-carbing, obesity and nutrition.


Doreen

Understood, Doreen. Thanks for keeping us focused.
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  #340   ^
Old Thu, Dec-03-20, 08:10
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Quote:
The anti-Covid diet: how zinc, selenium and probiotics could boost your immune response

Key nutrients found in everyday foods could help your body fight back against Covid-19 – and even enhance your response to a vaccine


At the British Nutrition Foundation’s virtual conference last week, leading scientists discussed the critical role of nutrition in the battle against Covid-19. Emerging research on Covid-19 patients, and a wealth of existing studies relating to other viral infections, suggests key nutrients such as selenium, zinc, vitamin D and probiotics may fortify the immune system, limit the severity of coronavirus symptoms and even reduce intensive care admissions and mortality rates.

Although this nutritional data requires further research, the results so far are intriguing. German research suggests patients who survived Covid-19 had higher levels of selenium – a nutrient found in turkey, sardines, eggs, Brazil nuts, liver and kidney – than those who died of the virus.

A Spanish study found that healthy levels of zinc – a mineral found in meat, poultry, cheese, shellfish and seeds – are linked to higher survival rates. Another paper found that 82.2 per cent of hospitalised coronavirus patients were deficient in vitamin D, which we gain through exposure to the sun. And an Italian study found that probiotics reduced the severity of Covid-19 symptoms and cut mortality rates.

“Nutrition is very important, not for ‘resistance’ in protecting you from getting Covid-19 but rather for improving your ‘tolerance’ of it,” explains Prof Mike Gleeson, Emeritus Professor of Exercise Biochemistry at Loughborough University and author of Eat, Move, Sleep, Repeat. “Tolerance means a decreased infection burden when you get infected, so you could get less severe symptoms and recover more quickly. That’s the possible role of nutrition. We're talking about compounds which may optimise immune response or have beneficial anti-inflammatory or antioxidant actions.”

Nothing you eat is going to stop you contracting Covid-19, warns Prof Gleeson: “This virus is so contagious it is going to get past our immunity barriers.” But a strong immune system will inevitably help you to fight it more effectively. “What we're relying on is our immune response when we do get infected. And if you're deficient in micronutrients, it may increase your risk of severe symptoms.”

The general link between a healthy diet and improved resilience to infections is nothing new, but interest in which nutrients may best support this “tolerogenic” effect is growing. Your body’s immune response to any virus requires a delicate balancing act: if your immune response is too low, your body’s defences will be overwhelmed. But if your immune response is too high, the defensive processes involved can cause excessive tissue damage and drive resources away from other vital functions, weakening your body further. Good nutrition can help to optimise this immune response.

“Essentially your immune system gets rid of viruses by seeking out your own cells which have become infected and destroying them,” explains Prof Gleeson. “So there's a real balance needed in your immune response. You want to be able to tolerate the virus, to some degree, in order to dampen your defence a little bit but still control the infection in order to reduce the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (when the lungs cannot provide the vital organs with enough oxygen) which can develop if you get too much inflammation in the lungs.”

So how might these key nutrients help your body get it right? Research suggests selenium helps to cleverly refine your immune response. “You get less severe inflammation if you have a good selenium status,” says Prof Gleeson. “There's evidence that you get improved proliferation of your lymphocytes (white blood cells) which help to activate the cell lines that specifically respond to a virus.”

Zinc, meanwhile, helps to prevent viruses from proliferating. “Viruses have a protective coat which surrounds their genetic material and the first thing they do when they get into your cells is un-coat themselves, release their genetic material and take over your own machinery for enzymes to help generate other viruses within that cell,” explains Gleeson. “But zinc helps to inhibit that viral un-coating, as well as the enzyme which allows that genetic material to be reproduced in the cell, to help prevent a virus from proliferating.”

Probiotics may also play an important role because your gut is a key part of your immune system. “About 70 per cent of your immune cells are located in and around the gut,” explains Prof Gleeson. But your gut is also a harbouring site for Covid-19.

“The gut is a nice nutrient soup which bacteria and viruses love to feed on. Research suggests probiotics can modify that gut population of bacteria to give it a healthier profile. Probiotics can also modify immune cells in the gut which can then migrate to other areas, including the lungs – and this may be where you get some protection.”

The link between vitamin D and Covid-19 is not yet confirmed but the vitamin plays a key role in general immunity. “We know from studies on the common cold that with low vitamin D you're more likely to pick up viral infections,” says Gleeson. “Although 10ug is the recommended dose, if you’ve not had sun for months that’s not enough to get you up to the levels you want for optimal immune function, so we suggest at least 1000IU, or 25ug.”

So Vitamin D supplements may be necessary over winter but Prof Gleeson insists we can get most of the other immunity-optimising nutrients from our everyday diet. As well as the foods listed above, nuts, cod and wholegrains also contain selenium (RDA 75μg for men, 60ug for women); beef, dairy and spinach also provide zinc (RDA 9.5mg for men, 7mg for women); and a healthy mix of fruit and veg will contribute to your healthy gut bacteria, which can be topped up with probiotics.

But if this nutritional evidence is not compelling enough, it seems that improving your diet may even help you ahead of the imminent roll-out of Covid-19 vaccines. “We know that with vaccines like the one for the influenza virus, selenium and vitamin D are linked to stronger antibody responses to the vaccination,” explains Prof Gleeson. “So it makes sense to boost up, ready for when we all get the chance to have this vaccine.”


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...d-boost-immune/
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  #341   ^
Old Fri, Dec-04-20, 04:39
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Quote:
High blood sugar levels linked to COVID-19 deaths in those without diabetes

COVID outcomes and mortality rates are worse among people who have abnormally high blood sugar levels, researchers have said.

The Spanish team say these findings are the same irrespective of whether someone has diabetes or not.

The study involved more than 11,000 people who were deemed non-critical and had been admitted to hospital.

One in five people passed away while there, and the mortality rates were highest among those with the greatest blood glucose levels. Death rates did not differ between those with or without diabetes.

The researches say the research paper adds to growing evidence that high blood glucose levels, otherwise known as hyperglycaemia, are linked with a higher risk of death among those who become infected with coronavirus.

Those who had abnormally high glucose levels were more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19, when compared to those whose levels were in a more normal range. Higher blood glucose levels also increase the chance of requiring a ventilator and being admitted to the intensive care unit.

The research team is now urging medical teams to screen for hyperglycemia among anyone who is hospitalised with COVID-19, whether they have diabetes or not.

Study coordinator Dr Javier Carrasco from Juan Ramon Jimenez University Hospital, said: “Screening for hyperglycaemia in patients without diabetes and early treatment should be mandatory in the management of patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

“Admission hyperglycaemia should not be overlooked, but rather detected and appropriately treated to improve the outcomes of COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes.”

The study has been published in the journal Annals of Medicine.


https://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/202...t-diabetes.html
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  #342   ^
Old Tue, Jan-12-21, 11:16
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Demi Demi is offline
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In the Daily Fail, but even so ...

Quote:
Bacteria in your GUT affects your immune response to Covid-19 and could influence how severely you suffer symptoms, study finds
  • South Korean study reviewed pre-existing research on role of gut microbiome
  • Hong Kong-based scientists examined blood and stool samples from patients
  • Both studies indicate a gut microbe imbalance is key in severe Covid-19

A person's gut microbiome may play a role in fighting off coronavirus infection and preventing severe Covid-19 symptoms, according to new studies.

Each person has a unique assortment of bacteria in their gut which play a variety of roles, including in modulating the immune response.

Research from the Chinese University of Hong Kong found people suffering with Covid-19 had a 'significantly altered' microbiome composition.

Separate research from South Korea found people with a poorly functioning gut are more likely to develop severe Covid-19 because the lack of healthy microbes makes it easier for the virus to infect cells in the digestive tract.


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...9-severity.html
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  #343   ^
Old Today, 10:09
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Covid deaths high in countries with more overweight people, says report

Quote:
Countries with high levels of overweight people, such as the UK and the US, have the highest death rates from Covid-19, a landmark report reveals, prompting calls for governments to urgently tackle obesity, as well as prioritising overweight people for vaccinations.

About 2.2 million of the 2.5 million deaths from Covid were in countries with high levels of overweight people, says the report from the World Obesity Federation. Countries such as the UK, US and Italy, where more than 50% of adults are overweight, have the biggest proportions of deaths linked to coronavirus.

The issue is not just obesity, but levels of weight that many assume are now normal in many countries. Death rates are 10 times higher in those where more than half the adults had a body mass index (BMI) of more than 25kg/m2 – the point at which normal weight tips into overweight. ... Continues

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...ple-says-report
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