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  #1   ^
Old Fri, May-31-19, 23:09
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Obesity has become 'the new smoking'

Quote:
From The Telegraph
London, UK
31 May, 2019

Obesity has become 'the new smoking' and will fuel weight-related cancers, head of NHS warns

Obesity has become “the new smoking” and is set to fuel double the number of weight-related cancers within two decades, the head of the NHS today warns.

Simon Stevens raised fears that the UK is apeing the United States, as medics warned that today’s deadly lifestyles could set back decades of medical advances.

The NHS forecasts show that by 2035, the health service is set to be treating more than 40,000 cases of cancer linked to excess weight - a rise from around 22,800 in 2015.

By 2030, there will be around 36,800 such cases annually - around 100 a day - the statistics suggest.

And by 2043, obesity is set to overtake smoking as being the leading preventable cause of cancer in women.

Mr Stevens warned that obesity has become “the new smoking,” as 40,000 medics today met for the world’s largest cancer conference.

The chief executive of the NHS, said: “While cancer survival is at a record high, many people don’t yet realise that obesity causes cancer. On current trends by 2030 we could see 100 new patients every day being diagnosed with obesity-related cancer.

“So obesity is the new smoking, and if we continue to pile on the pounds, we’re heading for thousands more avoidable cancer deaths every year.”

Britain has the highest rates of obesity in Western Europe, with rates of obesity rising even faster than those in the United States.

Around 29 per cent of UK adults are now obese – twice the level in 1993.

Mr Stevens will today say: “The NHS can’t win the ‘battle of the bulge’ on its own – families, food businesses and government all need to play their part if we’re to avoid copying America’s damaging and costly obesity epidemic.”

The warnings come as research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (Asco) in Chicago warns of the global impact of the obesity epidemic.

Harvard University expert Dr Jennifer Ligibel will today present evidence showing the impact of obesity on breast cancer, calling for more action to prevent deadly weight gain.

She raised fears that the rapid rise in obesity could soon reverse medical gains in cancer.

Dr Ligibel, from Harvard’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, said: “It is very troubling. We are making major advances in cancer therapies and treatment, but the risk is that obesity could undercut all of this.

“We are also learning that with some cancers it seems the level of adiposity could make the disease more aggressive.

“This is a global problem - at the moment the US has higher levels of obesity but the UK is catching up.

“We really don’t yet know the full consequences that obesity could bring in terms of cancer.”

Dr Ligibel, who will today present research on breast cancer and weight management said people needed more help to lose weight.

She said slimming programmes could help people to make long-term changes, which could reduce their risk of cancer.

“There is a really clear relationship between weight and obesity, we know that it causes a higher risk of developing a dozen different cancers.

“It’s about keeping your body within a healthy weight range, taking regular exercise, a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, lean meat products, limiting alcohol intake.

“Obesity is now one of the greatest challenges facing the world,” she said.

Today she will present a body of evidence about the impact of weight on breast cancer, including studies which suggest every 11 lbs weight gain increases the risk of the disease by up to eight per cent.

Her lecture will also highlight studies showing that those following at least five healthy lifestyle tips drawn up by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) had a 60 per cent lower risk of breast cancer.

The advice includes staying a healthy weight, being physically active and limiting alcohol, salt and meat.

Dr Kate Allen, executive director of science and public affairs at WCRF said the figures were “shocking”.

“We know that obesity is a cause of at least 12 different types of cancer and with over 60 per cent of UK adults overweight or obese, serious action is needed if we are to prevent a rise in obesity related cancers, as this rise is not inevitable.”

Professor Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s prevention expert, said: “These are extremely worrying numbers that paint a bleak picture, and should be a wakeup call to the Government.

“Being overweight or obese is the biggest preventable cause of cancer in the UK after smoking. Extra fat in the body doesn’t just sit there, it’s active, sending out signals that can tell cells in our body to divide more often, which can increase the risk of cancer.”

She accused ministers of “dragging their feet” and failing to tackle childhood obesity, urging them to introduce a 9pm watershed on junk food adverts which has been proposed.



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...elated-cancers/
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Jun-01-19, 07:45
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

Quote:
“There is a really clear relationship between weight and obesity, we know that it causes a higher risk of developing a dozen different cancers."

Yes, there is a relationship in that people who are overweight can develop cancer. It's a correlation. People who are not obese develop cancer as well. Perhaps the WOE that stimulated the weight gain is also causing cancer. In this case, weight is simply another recognized association, particularly from the point of view of the metabolic theory of cancer.
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Jun-02-19, 04:36
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Default

Non-optimal weight is a SYMPTOM of something, I am now convinced. We have people with genetics that they might not create this particular symptom as easily as say, me.

Having reached my lowest ever weight now, with Keto, and feeling better than I have in YEARS... I have the result they want me to have, but they won't let me take the one road that goes there?
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Jun-02-19, 11:17
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Default

Quote:
“It’s about keeping your body within a healthy weight range, taking regular exercise, a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, lean meat products, limiting alcohol intake.

“Obesity is now one of the greatest challenges facing the world,” she said.

Today she will present a body of evidence about the impact of weight on breast cancer, including studies which suggest every 11 lbs weight gain increases the risk of the disease by up to eight per cent.

Her lecture will also highlight studies showing that those following at least five healthy lifestyle tips drawn up by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) had a 60 per cent lower risk of breast cancer.

The advice includes staying a healthy weight, being physically active and limiting alcohol, salt and meat.


Same old song and dance. Eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and limit meat and salt. I don't recall alcohol being cited too often, but it seems now they're pointing to alcohol too. At least they didn't specify dietary fats as a culprit, and push everyone to eat a bushel of whole grains daily.


And I agree with GRB - I've known people who were never even the least bit overweight who developed cancer, just like I've known those who are overweight who have developed cancer.


Oddly enough among those I've known who had cancer, those who are overweight tend to better withstand the ravages on the body from chemo treatments, and survive cancer longer, or even beat it altogether, while those who are in the normal weight range when diagnosed don't have any reserves to rely on to survive the severity of the cancer treatments to begin with. That's just my observation among those I've known though -statistically, that may not be the case.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Jun-04-19, 09:51
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
Oddly enough among those I've known who had cancer, those who are overweight tend to better withstand the ravages on the body from chemo treatments, and survive cancer longer, or even beat it altogether, while those who are in the normal weight range when diagnosed don't have any reserves to rely on to survive the severity of the cancer treatments to begin with. That's just my observation among those I've known though -statistically, that may not be the case.


This was the idea of chubby, healthy, children as my farm community had it. Fat reserves might just keep these children alive from those epidemics that swept through the village.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Jun-04-19, 16:08
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
This was the idea of chubby, healthy, children as my farm community had it. Fat reserves might just keep these children alive from those epidemics that swept through the village.



Yep - even 100 years ago, the preference was for very chubby babies. I have some old crochet directions from the 1940's for baby clothes - the babies in those pictures were very, VERY chubby. My mother told me one time that my grandmother said you could tell a healthy baby by how many "rings" of fat there were around the baby's legs and arms - the more rings of fat there were, the healthier the baby was. If they had enough fat (and potentially enough fluid reserves), they could survive a stomach bug, but the thin child didn't have any reserves from which to draw, and quickly became dehydrated.



But that was back before the days of pedialite, anti-diarrheal and antiemetic (anti-nausea, anti-vomiting) meds, or IV fluids to avoid deadly dehydration from a stomach illness.



(side story: DH's uncle apparently succumbed to such an illness as a baby - this would have been back in the 1910's or 1920's, since MIL was a little girl at the time. Story goes that MIL's baby brother was just old enough to be crawling around on the kitchen floor, found a piece of raw onion and ate it, and that's what made him so sick, at least that's what they blamed for his illness and death. Could have just as easily been some kind of stomach bug. Nevertheless, without modern treatments, he did not survive.)



These days, any parent who allowed their child to become even half that fat (especially at such a young age) would be thoroughly lectured on the dangers of obesity by the baby's doctor.
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Jun-05-19, 01:22
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
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Progress: 381%
Location: UK
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Quote:
Is it time to treat sugar like smoking?

Over the past decade, smoking has become marginalised and stigmatised.


From the smoking ban in 2007 to the introduction of plain packaging a decade later, everything has been done to discourage people from taking up the habit.

And there are signs sugar is heading the same way.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-48499195
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