Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Kitchen: Low-Carb Recipes > Salads Veggies & Side Dishes
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sun, Aug-24-08, 10:13
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default Potassium Broth

Here's a recipe for a low-carb broth that provides about 750 mg. potassium/cup!

Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_cohn
Here's an updated recipe in text format and PDF format.

Ingredients
6 medium Russet potatoes
6 celery stalks
1 bu. parsley
1 med. parsnip
2 med. carrots
14 C. water
ginger root, 5 1-in. slices
Italian seasonings blend (opt.)

Tools
Measuring cup
6-qt. pot w/ cover
knife, chopping
potato peeler
skimmer or other tool to remove vegetables from broth
ladle
Canning funnel
conical mesh strainer
canning jars, 24 oz (3)

1. Measure water into pot, then cover. Bring water to a boil.

2. While water heats up, wash produce gently. (Hard scrubbing removes minerals found in the vegetables' skins).

3. Peel potatoes to a depth of 1/8 in. Set potato bodies aside for other use, or discard them.

4. Cut other vegetables in half, so they will fit into the pot.

5. When water boils, put all veggies (except potato bodies) and seasoning into the water.

6. Bring broth to a boil, with the lid on, again, then simmer, with the lid on, for 1.5 hrs.

7. Add the ginger slices; then continue simmering with the lid on, for 30 min.

8. Remove large vegetable matter, then allow small vegetable matter to settle for 5 minutes with the lid on.

9. Insert canning funnel into neck of canning jar, then rest strainer inside the funnel.

10. Ladle into canning jars (fill to neck). This will allow you to use expose smaller portions of the broth to airborne bacteria for less time, preventing premature spoiling. To get the last of the broth, pour it through the mesh strainer.

Nutrition Information
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 10
Protein: 0 g
Carbohydrates: 1g
Fiber: 0g
EGC: 1g
Fat: 1.0 g
Sodium: 21.5 mg.
Potassium: 771.6 mg.
Calcium 98.9 mg.
Magnesium: 59.0 mg.

Drink 2-4 cups daily, spread out over the day. Each cup contains approximately 750 mg. potassium, and the average body needs 2mg. of potassium for every calorie of food consumed for optimal muscle function and electrolyte balance.

Don’t be concerned with taking in this much potassium at once from food. Murray's Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements says that although potassium salts can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and ulcers when given in pill form at high doses, these effects do not occur “when potassium levels are increased through diet alone.” (emphasis mine). Therefore, the best course is to use foods or food-based potassium supplements to meet the human body's high potassium requirements.”

Notes: Using organic ingredients will increase the potassium content to approximately 1100 mg./cup. Using 1 qt. of cooking water from boiled spinach will boost the potassium content further.

Magnesium carries potassium into the cells. Take a magnesium supplment (chelated form, e.g., citrate, malate), or eat high-magnesium foods (http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodco...nk/wt_rank.html) within an hour of drinking the broth.

Last edited by Rosebud : Mon, Dec-05-11 at 20:46. Reason: Tranferring info from post #10
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Fri, Nov-25-11, 11:51
somebloke somebloke is offline
New Member
Posts: 22
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 188/176/166 Male 175
BF:
Progress:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_cohn
Here's a recipe for a low-carb broth that provides about 750 mg. potassium/cup!


The recipe for potassium broth sure looks nice,and tasty too .

but still many carbs and starches, potates, carrots ,parsnip,

But I reckon per carb this Broth might just outweigh a banana for potassium . so thanks for the tip.

I can't seem to find an oganic way of getting pottasium , without a carb rush,

I agree as above the blood pressure issue needs a doctors opinion./Advice .

best of luck

somebloke

Last edited by somebloke : Fri, Nov-25-11 at 13:26.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Fri, Nov-25-11, 12:38
MisterE's Avatar
MisterE MisterE is offline
90 Days at a Time
Posts: 18,731
 
Plan: Glycemic Load
Stats: 426/405.2/326 Male 74 in.
BF:
Progress: 21%
Location: USofA
Default

That is the dosage of my scripted potassium. Betcha the broth is easier to get down. I would rather 3 cups of broth over 3 horse pills.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Fri, Nov-25-11, 16:00
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default

At the end of the cooking, you remove the vegetable matter from the broth. While some vegetable matter, and therefore, carbs, have mixed with the liquid, the amount is negligible.

Also, any reports of potassium overdosing in the medical literature have been from supplemental potassium. There have been no reports of overdosing from food sources.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Fri, Nov-25-11, 16:40
bike2work bike2work is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,536
 
Plan: Fung-inspired fasting
Stats: 336/000/160 Female 5' 9"
BF:
Progress: 191%
Location: Seattle metro area
Default

I don't know about this ... I have some doubts. I looked up the potassium content of each of the ingredients and none of them are particularly rich sources of potassium. I kinda think that someone just added up the potassium of all the ingredients and assumed that all of it ends up in the broth and none of it remains in the veggies that are strained out. I also have my doubts about the final carb count. It looks like someone just assumed that the carbs are staying in the veggies that get strained out. I think a lot more would get into the broth after hours of cooking. Potatoes begin to dissolve after only 20 minutes.

I kinda doubt that someone actually ran this through a lab test. Exercise caution.

Sorry for being so cynical.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Fri, Nov-25-11, 17:15
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default

Allison,

You're right: I just added up all the numbers from nutritiondata.com and assumed that they got mixed into the broth. This is an adapted recipe from Krispin Sullivan, and I used her numbers as the basis for mine. Since potassium is a water-soluble mineral, I thought it was a safe bet to assume that the potassium leached out from the veggies and didn't go back.

Regarding carbs, you don't use the entire potato — just the peels, so there's almost no potato to dissolve into the broth.

But since I always insist on the best evidence possible to substantiate others' claims, you're right to require the same standard from me. When I make my next batch, I'll have a sample analyzed by Anresco labs in SF. Determining the potassium and carb content won't cost much.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Sat, Nov-26-11, 03:52
rightnow's Avatar
rightnow rightnow is offline
Every moment is NOW.
Posts: 21,102
 
Plan: LC (ketogenic)
Stats: 520/350/280 Female 66 inches
BF: Why yes it is.
Progress: 71%
Location: Ozarks USA
Default

Oh brother!

OK... the numbers are imperfect on just about anything that is a mixed concoction. Try figuring out the numbers on stuff you fry or boil... it's pretty much riddled with having to make assumptions. I don't think you need a lab analysis to post a recipe. :-)

It would be nice if it were not in PDF though. I can't save files when checking in from work so I can't even see it.

PJ
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Sat, Nov-26-11, 10:40
bike2work bike2work is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,536
 
Plan: Fung-inspired fasting
Stats: 336/000/160 Female 5' 9"
BF:
Progress: 191%
Location: Seattle metro area
Default

Oh, gosh, I certainly didn't mean to suggest that you need to do a lab analysis. I was only questioning that none of the potassium would remain in the veggies and that all of the carbs would.

I completely agree, no need to send it to the lab for analysis.

Also, I failed to read the directions. I thought the potatoes were going in.

Last edited by bike2work : Sat, Nov-26-11 at 11:04.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Mon, Dec-05-11, 19:53
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default

Too late: I sent a sample to the lab a week ago for analysis. I should get the results back late this month.
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Mon, Dec-05-11, 20:20
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default

Here's an updated recipe in text format and PDF format.

Ingredients
6 medium Russet potatoes
6 celery stalks
1 bu. parsley
1 med. parsnip
2 med. carrots
14 C. water
ginger root, 5 1-in. slices
Italian seasonings blend (opt.)

Tools
Measuring cup
6-qt. pot w/ cover
knife, chopping
potato peeler
skimmer or other tool to remove vegetables from broth
ladle
Canning funnel
conical mesh strainer
canning jars, 24 oz (3)

1. Measure water into pot, then cover. Bring water to a boil.

2. While water heats up, wash produce gently. (Hard scrubbing removes minerals found in the vegetables' skins).

3. Peel potatoes to a depth of 1/8 in. Set potato bodies aside for other use, or discard them.

4. Cut other vegetables in half, so they will fit into the pot.

5. When water boils, put all veggies (except potato bodies) and seasoning into the water.

6. Bring broth to a boil, with the lid on, again, then simmer, with the lid on, for 1.5 hrs.

7. Add the ginger slices; then continue simmering with the lid on, for 30 min.

8. Remove large vegetable matter, then allow small vegetable matter to settle for 5 minutes with the lid on.

9. Insert canning funnel into neck of canning jar, then rest strainer inside the funnel.

10. Ladle into canning jars (fill to neck). This will allow you to use expose smaller portions of the broth to airborne bacteria for less time, preventing premature spoiling. To get the last of the broth, pour it through the mesh strainer.

Nutrition Information
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 10
Protein: 0 g
Carbohydrates: 1g
Fiber: 0g
EGC: 1g
Fat: 1.0 g
Sodium: 21.5 mg.
Potassium: 771.6 mg.
Calcium 98.9 mg.
Magnesium: 59.0 mg.

Drink 2-4 cups daily, spread out over the day. Each cup contains approximately 750 mg. potassium, and the average body needs 2mg. of potassium for every calorie of food consumed for optimal muscle function and electrolyte balance.

Don’t be concerned with taking in this much potassium at once from food. Murray's Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements says that although potassium salts can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and ulcers when given in pill form at high doses, these effects do not occur “when potassium levels are increased through diet alone.” (emphasis mine). Therefore, the best course is to use foods or food-based potassium supplements to meet the human body's high potassium requirements.”

Notes: Using organic ingredients will increase the potassium content to approximately 1100 mg./cup. Using 1 qt. of cooking water from boiled spinach will boost the potassium content further.

Magnesium carries potassium into the cells. Take a magnesium supplment (chelated form, e.g., citrate, malate), or eat high-magnesium foods (http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodco...nk/wt_rank.html) within an hour of drinking the broth.
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Sun, Dec-25-11, 11:29
aj_cohn's Avatar
aj_cohn aj_cohn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,948
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 213/167/165 Male 65 in.
BF:35%/23%/20%
Progress: 96%
Location: United States
Default

I got the lab results back, and the naysayers were right (see attached):
  • potassium: 149 mg/cup
  • carbohydrates: 4.8 mg/cup
Not worth the effort to make.

I emailed the woman who runs the site where I got the recipe. She admitted that she (a) had never made the recipe (b) will revise the next edition of her book to recommend juicing high-potassium vegetables, since the potassium is locked up inside the cell walls.

I'm not in a position to buy a juicer, and neither are a lot of people. Besides, can you even juice potato peels?

Last edited by aj_cohn : Sun, Dec-25-11 at 11:37.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Sun, Dec-25-11, 11:40
MisterE's Avatar
MisterE MisterE is offline
90 Days at a Time
Posts: 18,731
 
Plan: Glycemic Load
Stats: 426/405.2/326 Male 74 in.
BF:
Progress: 21%
Location: USofA
Default

Thank you so much for taking the time and trouble (not to mention expense) to derive this information.
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Sun, Dec-25-11, 13:16
gonwtwindo's Avatar
gonwtwindo gonwtwindo is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,666
 
Plan: General Low Carb
Stats: 164/162.6/151 Female 5'3"
BF:Sure is
Progress: 11%
Location: SoCal
Default

2nd on the thank you. 149 mg. isn't much! But it *sounds* like such a good, natural source. Oh, well.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Sun, Dec-25-11, 14:18
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,212
 
Plan: Eat less, less often
Stats: 235/210/191 Female 66
BF:Hi wt: 276,255,235
Progress: 57%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
Default

I also really appreciate the lab analysis.

I actually made that potassium broth off the Krispin site one time and was disappointed that I didn't seem to get any kind of energy boost or other effect after drinking a lot of it. Now I know why. I seemed like a lot of bother too.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Sun, Dec-25-11, 23:22
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,392
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

Shake some Nu-Salt into that potassium broth and you can easily quadruple the amount of potassium.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:24.


Copyright © 2000-2019 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.