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  #1   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 01:16
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/000/160 Female 5'10"
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Location: UK
Default Three-quarters of food bought in UK hospitals is unhealthy, audit shows

Three-quarters of food bought in UK hospitals is unhealthy, audit shows

https://www.theguardian.com/society...ps-sweets-cakes

Quote:
But Aseem Malhotra, an NHS consultant cardiologist and professor of evidence-based medicine, said the measures were not enough. We need to be much more radical given where we are with the obesity epidemic. Hospitals should be setting an example, he said. We need to ban the sale of junk food completely in hospitals. If people want to buy this stuff, thats fine, they can go out and get it, but hospitals should not be selling it. They should be selling decent, healthy food.

Malhotra, who campaigns for a better food environment in hospitals, has called for a ban on junk food before. The latest audit, he said, shows how the snacks on offer, and how they are promoted, drive the choices people make whether they are visitors and patients or doctors and nurses.
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 05:57
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Location: Texas
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A friend whose sister just underwent surgery commented on how much the sister likes the sugary hot cocoa the hospital serves them. The "diabetic" meals I was given post birth with gestational diabetes were full of carbs with maybe some sugar substitute. As long as government guidelines keep pushing the kinds of foods they currently do I don't expect to see truly healthy food showing up at hospitals, nursing homes, etc. The stuff they fed my dad there was all cheap carby junk including lots of sugar. Guess I need to stay really healthy so I never need these type of services or I'd starve there.
Edit to add: and my dad was a known diabetic, too. Nurse giving insulin because his glucose was sky high after being fed an ice cream root beer float at lunch. Not even diet root beer. And this was a pretty good nursing home. So it's not just the snacks being sold to visitors, it's the entire view of what's considered okay to eat, although not selling the additional junk snacks is good. I don't think they belong in kid school vending machines, either.

Last edited by Zei : Wed, May-22-19 at 06:10.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 14:32
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Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,381
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
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Location: Longmont, Colorado
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It was over 5 years ago, but the last time that I ate at a hospital cafeteria there was literally no low-carb food available. Just lots of low-fat stuff.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, May-22-19, 17:00
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bevangel bevangel is offline
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Plan: modified adkins (sort of)
Stats: 265/176/167 Female 68.5 inches
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Location: Austin, TX
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I don't care that much about what is or is not sold in the vending machines and cafeterias of hospitals. People who CHOOSE to eat from vending machines and/or the hospital cafeteria almost always have other choices... if they WANT them. Plus, the cafeteria offerings are usually reasonably broad allowing one to pick and choose healthy options that suit one's own diet plan.

What REALLY bugs me are the food choices that are on the limited MENUS given to the patients! Someone stuck in a hospital bed doesn't have any other options unless a family member or friend brings food in to them.

"general" menu may not be that bad but the so-called "heart-healthy diet" menus are absolutely the WORST! Practically every option is high carbohydrate and almost nothing contains any fat. Even real whole eggs are not on the heart-healthy menu... just egg whites and egg white omelets made with low fat cheese. The few things on the menu that contain ANY fat (such as a hamburger patty) are "limited items" meaning the patient can't have more than ONE of them per meal! No butter is allowed. No cream. No half n half. No bacon except low fat turkey bacon and that's a limited item. No salad dressings except low fat ones. Etc. It makes it absolutely impossible to order a reasonably low-carb meal for a diabetic.

But, if the diabetic patient orders 2 or 3 waffles with maple syrup (and heart-healthy "buttery" spread) along with a bowl of oatmeal with brown sugar and fat-free milk, plus a banana and some cantaloupe with a large glass of orange juice to wash it all down with for breakfast, they'll happily bring THAT in. And if he orders a low-fat turkey sandwich on two slices of whole wheat bread, a side of oven-baked fries, and a cup of chicken noodle soup for lunch along with a cherry cobbler topped with low-fat vanilla icecream or lemon sherbet and a chocolate chip cookie for dessert, no one says a word! It's all "heart healthy" so he's good to go and the nurse will stop in 30 minutes after his meal to check his blood sugar and give him an insulin dose!

And the worst thing is that many hospitalists will automatically order the "heart-healthy diet" for EVERY patient that is assigned to them. Once your doctor puts you on the "heart-healthy" menu, you're toast (pun intended). Getting a hospitalist to change his order to a "regular menu" takes an act of God.

About 4 years ago when my husband (a T2 diabetic) had to have surgery to correct a congenital heart valve defect, I brought food in for him for every single meal during the 5 days he spent in the hospital. The only thing he ate off the heart-healthy menu he was given coffee and salads. His nurses and his hospitalist had conniptions when they found out that I was bringing him real cream to add to his coffee, along with bacon and sausage and deviled eggs for breakfast, and things like beef fajitas with guacamole and real cheese for dinner. But, they couldn't argue with the fact that his blood sugars never once went high enough for him to need insulin. Nor with the fact that he recovered from the surgery BETTER and quicker than his doctor had anticipated.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 09:26
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Location: Herndon, VA
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Dr. Mark Cucuzzella has been the impetus to transition the hospital food where he practices in eastern WV to more healthy, whole food choices. It's obvious to anyone who visits a friend or family member in the hospital how bad the food is for the very people who are trying to get well, as Bev observes. More hospitals must become aware of this issue, and perhaps the examples of the food changes along with the reports of positive results in WV will help.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 10:15
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teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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When I've been in a hospital cafeteria--it's mostly been because somebody I care about was doing poorly. Usually I wasn't that worried about what I was eating. Comfort food comes to mind here. I don't know that hospital food really affected my overall diet much over time.

If just ten percent of a hospital's food offering is considered "unhealthy"--I'd bet people will make their choices largely from that ten percent. A vending machine full of apples will just gather dust.

We're autonomous beings. Given better information we can start demanding better choices by making them as individuals.
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 11:37
RonnieScot RonnieScot is offline
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Plan: LCHF, no breakfast.
Stats: 256/144/140 Female 5ft 3"
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Default

Yep, Id sign up for massive changes. Same as schools as all public buildings, do away with all vending machine sugary drinks, chocolates, sweets,. This constant stream of cake and biscuits expected every day with every coffee.

However, just to say, a relative of mine was in a NHS phyc ward in Yorkshire and on the menu was liver, fish, actual meat as well as a different veg soup every day. They were really impressed with the standard of cooking and food.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 13:40
PilotGal PilotGal is offline
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Plan: Maintenance since 2007.
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i had a hip replaced in 2008. I asked for a diabetic menu.. thinking it had the least amount of carbs, when in fact it was nothing but processed carbs.
very unhealthy. i don't see how anyone can maintain healthy insulin levels with the choices that were given me. i had food brought in.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 17:38
jschwab jschwab is online now
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Plan: Atkins72/Paleo/NoGrain/IF
Stats: 285/237/200 Female 5 feet 5.5 inches
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
When I've been in a hospital cafeteria--it's mostly been because somebody I care about was doing poorly. Usually I wasn't that worried about what I was eating. Comfort food comes to mind here. I don't know that hospital food really affected my overall diet much over time.

If just ten percent of a hospital's food offering is considered "unhealthy"--I'd bet people will make their choices largely from that ten percent. A vending machine full of apples will just gather dust.

We're autonomous beings. Given better information we can start demanding better choices by making them as individuals.


The problem is sometimes patients eat from there as well as the staff. I never see doctors eat anything but Diet Coke and salad, though.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, May-24-19, 18:34
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Ilikemice Ilikemice is offline
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Plan: Paleo-ish general LC
Stats: 151/122/118 Female 64 in
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Location: Middle Tennessee
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I posted here many years ago about a trip to my local hospital's cafeteria. There was no difference between it and a convenience store, except the convenience store at least offered cheese sticks. Oh, and the hospital's had a guy yelling "Get your brownies! They're LOW FAT!"
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  #11   ^
Old Sat, May-25-19, 11:42
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 2,913
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
When I've been in a hospital cafeteria--it's mostly been because somebody I care about was doing poorly. Usually I wasn't that worried about what I was eating. Comfort food comes to mind here. I don't know that hospital food really affected my overall diet much over time.

If just ten percent of a hospital's food offering is considered "unhealthy"--I'd bet people will make their choices largely from that ten percent. A vending machine full of apples will just gather dust.

We're autonomous beings. Given better information we can start demanding better choices by making them as individuals.

Yes, we should demand better choices, that is what some people are doing now, but for the patients who are held hostage for the duration of their hospital stays, the menus at most hospitals are terrible. As a visitor, I don't even think about food. As a resident patient, the hospital does the thinking for you. Plus, to get healthy food available at hospitals, we'd have to have agreement on what constitutes healthy food. The issue with this idea is that we are currently in an active argument in the US over the dietary guidelines, and agreement comes slowly with much controversy. Which dietary camp will influence hospitals the most? For me, I can't eat the way some camps think I should, as it's detrimental to my health.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PilotGal
i had a hip replaced in 2008. I asked for a diabetic menu.. thinking it had the least amount of carbs, when in fact it was nothing but processed carbs.
very unhealthy. i don't see how anyone can maintain healthy insulin levels with the choices that were given me. i had food brought in.

I had the same experience. I even tried this on airlines when I was traveling constantly. One would think the diabetic menu would help keep BG low. No! It keeps it high due to the assumption that everyone is taking insulin, and the menu provides much sweet processed food to protect people from going hypo. Insane!
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, May-25-19, 11:45
CityGirl8 CityGirl8 is offline
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Posts: 700
 
Plan: Protein Power, IF
Stats: 238/206/145 Female 5'8"
BF:53.75%/46.6%/25%
Progress: 34%
Location: PNW
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Over the last five years, I've been in hospital cafeterias at least once a year when various family members have spent a day or two in the hospital.

In this area, I'd say they're not terrible. Yeah, there are lots of ice-cold pre-made sandwiches in coolers and boring salads that are basically a box of lettuce with maybe 2 ounces of processed chicken. But during the main hours there's usually some sort of hot item like chicken that you can get with veggies. Unfortunately, I think that during off hours the pre-made sandwiches and lettuce boxes, along with chips, cookies, brownies, packages of cut up fruit, containers of low-fat sweetened yogurt, and bottled drinks are pretty much all that's available to staff who do shift work. Like, ILikeMice said, pretty much a local convenience store without the hotdogs. Since nothing else would be open in the neighborhood either, they're pretty much stuck.

What horrified me the most was the nurses pushing "protein smoothies" on patients. Every single time I've visited someone (and at different hospitals), the nurses recommended it as an item to order from the kitchen and people did. It reminded me of everyone bribing kids who were getting tonsillectomies with the promise of "all the milkshakes you want."

I'm not completely against protein powder. I have some in my house and use it in low-carb baking and sometimes make a smoothie for breakfast (not often). That's not my issue.

The hospital smoothies are very high sugar items like a "mango smoothie" with a little bit of protein powder thrown in. And they're massive--at least 20 ounces. They are like semi-melted mango sorbet, or a non-dairy milk shake. They must have close to 75g of carbs. They're just straight sugar under the guise of "protein smoothies." Last time I was there, my mom had two in a row in lieu of a real food meal.
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Jun-09-19, 05:28
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Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/000/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 381%
Location: UK
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Quote:
NHS patients being fed bacon with cancer-causing nitrites

Four out of five NHS hospital trusts are serving up bacon and ham products that have been linked to colorectal cancer


https://www.theguardian.com/society...at-cause-cancer


I'd rather take my chances with the bacon than with all the other cr*p food choices on offer in the NHS!
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