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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Nov-26-19, 03:29
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default It's time to call out unscientific vegan propaganda

It's time to call out unscientific vegan propaganda

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...gan-propaganda/

Quote:
Salad doesn't make men better in the sack

About 15 years ago there was a wonderful spoof school science programme on BBC2 called Look Around You, which would devise ever sillier experiments. But who needs old-fashioned satire when you can watch the Netflix programme, the Game-Changers, which purports to show how a vegan diet can improve athletic performance?

Most outrageously of all it claims that that a vegan diet can boost a man’s erection by 500 per cent. Wow, pass me another carrot patty. Or maybe not. It turns out that the ‘experiment’ claiming to show this involved, er, three college athletes over, er, two days. On the first evening they were fed burritos made from beef, pork and chicken. They then had the strength of their erection measured during the night. The following evening they were fed vegan burritos and were again measured in the night.

So in other words these men had been “vegan” for precisely 24 hours. But if you don’t want to believe that experiment, the series goes on to show endless muscly men, filmed eating green leaves and fruit juice, and who claim that their performance has been improved through eating a diet of nothing but plants.

Comparing these ripped specimens with the skinny, anaemic figures one sees poking around Waitrose’s vegan cabinet, it is hard not to ask: is there an unseen ingredient? Did these vegan body-builders really get to be the size they are by eating overflowing bowls of lettuce or is there some other parallel diet involved: one consisting of large quantities of pills, potions and other nutritional supplements? If you are going to get your nutrients from carefully-measured doses of vitamins and minerals then it doesn’t really matter what you eat – you could get away with a diet of cardboard.

The Netflix show is based on the personal epiphany of its co-producer Arnold Schwarzenegger, who says he feels much better on a vegan diet. But given that he says he built his body-building career on vast quantities of meat and 10-15 eggs a day that is not altogether surprising. It is a wonder he is still alive. You know there is a happy medium out there, Arnie: where you eat a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables but also a bit of meat, fish and dairy to spare you having to gulp down supplements of Vitamin B12, omega fatty acids and all the other stuff that is going to cause vegans problems if they go without.

It isn’t just Netflix, though. Type ‘vegan diet’ and ‘health benefits’ into Google and you are presented with all kinds of claims: going vegan can reduce your chances of heart disease, cancer and so on.

Even the respectable-looking stuff has something unsatisfactory about it. A study of nurses at George Mason University in Virginia claiming that 74 percent of participants had lowered their cholesterol 21 days into a vegan diet, and that 30 percent claimed they had more energy, turns out also to have a somewhat small sample size: just 19 nurses. In other words, that ’74 percent’ was 14 out of 19 nurses. And where was the control group? If you want to do such an experiment properly you would feed two groups with disguised food -- half of them would eat purely vegan and half of whom would eat some hidden meat.

Vegans like to quote the Adventist Mortality Study, an epidemiological study which has been following the health of 96,000 Adventists in California, and which claims that a vegetarian diet has reduced the risk of colon cancer by 50 percent and overall cancer risk by half. Vegetarian Adventists apparent live between 1.5 and 2.4 years longer than non-vegetarian ones.

But then the same study claims Adventist men live on average 7.7 years longer than California’s non-Adventist men – so what else is going on? Are they sure it is going meat-free which makes them cling on longer – or the hope of living to see the second coming?

Given the history of even reputable epidemiological studies to tell us one thing one minute and then the opposite the next – such as blaming heart disease alternately on saturated fat and sugar – I think I will take all this stuff with a very large pinch of, well, obviously not salt, but some kind of fortifying mineral. Then I’ll go on eating a balanced diet – even though, alas, it doesn’t make for great TV series.

Ross Clark

Quote:
My nails crumbled away when I went vegan and my skin broke out - now I’m ‘veganesque’

When I first went back to eating fish – a salmon salad – after a year spent being a strict vegan, I noticed the effect quite fast.

I felt more alert and aware, as though someone had woken me up. My experience replicated that of actor Anne Hathaway, who said she felt like her brain had “rebooted” when she returned to eating fish after some years eschewing all meat and fish for a plant-based diet.

Nor are we recovering vegans alone. Ellen DeGeneres has added fish and eggs into her formerly strict diet. Tim Shieff, a vegan YouTuber and influencer, has admitted adding meat back on to his plate as a tonic for symptoms such as “digestion issues… fatigue, brain fog, depression, lack of recovery, lack of energy, yawning all the time”, and “waking up stiff”.

And the new BMJ report warning that vegans may be risking serious nutritional deficiency and storing up a litany of health problems could be a wake-up call for the estimated 600,000 Britons who, according to the Vegan Society, now follow a plant-only diet.

I gave up fish, dairy and eggs in a moment of desperation. Having suffered merciless irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for years, I wanted to see if being vegan could end the unpredictable but regular bouts of spasms. Having already experimented with anti-spasmodic drugs, hypnotherapy, peppermint pills and so much more, this was about the only thing I hadn’t tried.

So I played around with various “milks” made of almonds, hazelnuts and cashews until I found Oatly (made from oats), which suited my tastebuds. I liked its sour cream substitute, too.

My grocery basket filled up with marinated tofu and quarter-pound vegan burgers from the Linda McCartney’s range, and sacks of kale and spinach.

And I tapped into a vegan network online where you learn what treat foods you can eat: salt-and-vinegar Pringles, Bourbon biscuits and Fry’s chocolate creams, since you ask.

My family were, for the most part, content. I swapped the macaroni cheese, Spanish omelettes and creamy fish pies for Thai green curries with cashews, Mexican three-bean chillis and pasta with aubergines and courgettes.

At first, I lost weight. And I noticed my IBS was improving. But my skin was not happy, with regular breakouts, and my nails crumbled away. I added in a vitamin B spray and ate vegan calcium tablets and kept going.

Around the time the boredom kicked in – Christmas, somewhat inevitably – I realised I wasn’t losing weight any more and indeed, the pounds were creeping back on. This seemed like the breaking of an unwritten contract that if you restrict your diet in such a draconian way, you can sneakily diet without having to think about it.

I looked at my overall eating habits and realised I was becoming hugely bread and peanut butter-reliant. Calories, it seems, don’t care if you are vegan or not.

Now I’m ‘veganesque’. The meat-free family meals we enjoyed – the chillis and curries – are still on the menu. I’ve probably upped my fruit and veg intake to seven or eight portions a day with ease.

But I no longer have to pretend that vegan “cheeses” are edible. Sorry, they’re not. Pass the comté.

Victoria Lambert

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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Nov-26-19, 09:25
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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And farming veggies on land that used to be pasture instead of eating meat does not save the planet, but harms it.

As long as you don't eat corn-fed beef, you are doing the planet a favor by eating it.

The cows fertilize the grasslands they graze on and nothing else is needed other than what mother nature provides. As long as the greedy ranchers are not overgrazing, it takes care of itself.

To grow veggies on relatively sterile grasslands requires tons of water and fertilizer.
Quote:
People tend to equate methane with cow farts (though their burps are worse), but we may be pointing our fingers in all the wrong places, according to a new study. The production of ammonia for fertilizer may result in up to 100 times more emissions than has been previously estimated for this sector. And that alone is more than what the Environmental Protection Agency estimates all industries emit across the U.S.



https://earther.gizmodo.com/just-on...pa-h-1835376030

The veggies have an agenda, and if they win, we won't be able to get beef in the stores anymore for a reasonable price, if at all.

Bob
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Nov-26-19, 17:37
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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As I remarked on a keto doctor's Twitter feed recently, "Yes, all the North American megafauna were hunted to extinction by vegetarians."
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 04:02
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Bumping this because I found a review of the documentary which lays out good information. I'm STILL hearing about this from the clueless around me: "But even body builders go vegan!"

Game Changers Movie Review: Fact vs. Fiction has an excellent point:

Quote:
If you’re reading a research study, you probably like to take a look at who funded it first. For some reason, however, when it comes to the entertainment industry, we don’t always pay as much attention to where the money is coming from.


Especially when you consider what a documentary is telling you. Film is perhaps the most powerful at engaging our emotions, which routinely bypass the logical parts of our brain.

Quote:
The films executive producers include Jackie Chan, Louie Psihoyos, and James Cameron and his wife Suzy Amis Cameron. James Cameron is an Academy Award-winning filmmaker known for movies like The Titanic and Avatar.

What most people don’t know about this Oscar-winning producer and his wife, however, is that they’re also the founders of Verdiant Foods, an organic pea protein company[*].

But this isn’t just some dinky plant-based protein start-up. As a press release from 2017 states; “Cameron has the goal to become the largest organic pea protein fractionation facility in North America”[*]. He’s also partnered with Ingredion, one of the leading global ingredient suppliers, racking up an investment of $140 million[*]. So he definitely has no skin in the game, right?


Which explains why pea protein is EVERYWHERE all of a sudden. And why Dr. Dean Ornish shows up!

Quote:
Of course, you want vegan “experts” to talk about veganism. But any balanced film on nutrition for athletic performance would interview an array of nutrition experts; not just the ones making money off a vegan agenda.


One of the advantages of athletic performance is that it is not subjective. Someone is faster or stronger or more strategic. They win.

Quote:
And as for the parade of vegans winning the Olympics, it begs the question — how many meat-eaters have also won the Olympics? Just sayin’.


Quote:
In one insight into pre-vegan dieting, Bryant Jennings (a heavy-weight boxer) explains how he grew up on popeyes, KFC, and fried chicken. He goes on to mention that he didn’t even know about half of the vegetables out there until he gave up meat in 2012.

Well yes, it makes sense then that switching from a diet made up of mostly low-quality fast food to a diet full of whole foods would make you feel better — regardless of whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, paleo, or keto.

You can’t fairly assert that switching from a fast-food diet to a vegan diet is going to make you feel better solely because you’re eating more plants. What about all the preservatives, sugar, processed ingredients, and additives that this person is also no longer consuming?


This is a great point because, sadly, this is one of the reasons behind the Vegan Honeymoon Syndrome. Moving from junk to less junk can feel really good... at first. It's a complicated explanation involving cell permeability. But the downsides appear only months in, and get worse over time. This is when people get trapped, like quicksand. The more they struggle to "do it right" the worse things get. But that seductive honeymoon keeps beckoning.

Quote:
The filmmakers finish this segment by mentioning that glucose is our primary fuel source, and we are clearly meant to eat only plants since they are the best source of fuel. It sounds like these guys haven’t heard about ketones.


Key to my situation, and why I eat so few plants of late, is this:

Quote:
This may not sound like that big of a deal, but when it comes down to your actual diet, the question becomes; how much rice and beans do you need to eat to make the same amount of complete protein in a 4oz piece of chicken?
...
For this, researchers have come up with something called the PDCAAS (protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score) score. The PDCAAS measures the quality of a protein for human consumption. It takes into account the amino acid composition, the digestibility of amino acids, and the bioavailability of the amino acids[*].

A PDCAAS rating of 1.0 is a perfect score, with eggs, milk, and whey protein scoring a perfect 1.0, and beef coming in right behind with .92. If you look at vegetarian sources of protein, you get kidney beans coming in at .54, red lentils at .53, and peanuts .52[*][*].


Those last three items? Full of lectins. As I discovered over a two day period of nausea from ONE cashew, my body reacts to these plant poisons like they are poisons. Now I know! It took abstaining from all legumes to discover what my metabolism really thinks of them. Much like I used to painlessly consume gluten, and now it's like someone turned on a blowtorch in my stomach.

Quote:
What’s more, some anti-nutrient compounds found only in plants can disrupt the absorption of amino acids. Even though the PDCAAS score accounts for digestibility, it doesn’t account for amino acids lost in the ilium (a section of your colon), where most anti-nutrient absorption takes place.

In an animal study, researchers found that anti-nutrients in peas, fava beans, chickpeas. and lupin inhibited the absorption of some of the amino acids present in these plant foods[*].


Bio-availability is my new word for nutrition. I'm probably out on the extreme end when it comes to getting anything good out of plants. But I can't be the only one.

Quote:
The heart disease debate is always a fan favorite among vegans when talking about meat consumption. Typically, they rely heavily on the cholesterol-lowering aspects of a plant-based diet.

While you can indeed find plenty of research to support the cholesterol-lowering effects of eating plants, the link to heart disease is still heavily up for debate. And in fact, more recent research is uncovering that it’s the size of the LDL particle, not its mere presence that should be of concern[*].

Interestingly, the ketogenic diet has a positive influence on the size of LDL particles, producing fluffier, less atherogenic (dangerous) particles[*].


I wish more doctors knew that.

Quote:
A study published in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism found that when diabetic volunteers ate a low-carb diet (20% of calories) vs. a low glycemic diet (55% of calories from carbs) they saw better glycemic control and more participants in this group were able to come off their medications[*].

The vegan diet may be many things, but it certainly is not low-carb.


Which was another problem for me when I tried to be vegetarian. I was eating eggs and cheese, too! And now, trying to heal my body from years of ill health, I think I need MORE protein, not less.

There's lots more science at the link. But in conclusion:

Quote:
With a backdrop of visionary scientists, the producers make their case for an explosive rise of plant-based eating.

If only the research supported their claims.

But hey — with a team of box office film executives backing the movie it’s no surprise the Game Changers movie won at the Sundance Film Festival.


That's what we're up against. The New Puritans.
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 06:20
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Benay Benay is offline
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One of the news stories I posted on Twitter came out from a Canadian press story.

British Columbia was considering using human remains as a component of their compost production.

I have heard nothing since about this plan so don't know if the BC legislators went ahead with its approval

Imagine having human remains in your back yard garden or in the fields of soybeans and potatoes.

Interesting concept

I wonder of the BC department of health nixed the idea
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 08:58
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benay
One of the news stories I posted on Twitter came out from a Canadian press story.

British Columbia was considering using human remains as a component of their compost production.

I have heard nothing since about this plan so don't know if the BC legislators went ahead with its approval

Imagine having human remains in your back yard garden or in the fields of soybeans and potatoes.


Interesting concept

I wonder of the BC department of health nixed the idea



If they do this, it'll only be a matter of time before they skip the compost part, and we end up with Soylent Green.



WB is right in that the pea protein is showing up in everything these days. I wandered through the supplement and nutritional bar aisle at walmart the other day to see if there was any kind of shelf stable, commercially made bar that wouldn't set off cravings for me, since I have yet to find a recipe for some kind of LC snack/meal that is shelf stable and won't set off cravings (so I can take it when we travel and/or visit relatives who provide nothing but carb laden foods for several days - nuts are out because I can't stop until they're all gone, and that alone sets off cravings for more). Even the supposed keto bars had pea protein in them! If I recall correctly, it's one of the primary ingredients in the fake meats too.



My creepy thoughts on this: What happens when it becomes somewhere between difficult and impossible to obtain animal proteins (you know this is what PETA wants), and nutritionists eventually realize that people are not getting anything resembling enough (or complete) protein from non-animal sources?



Make way for Soylent Green. I find it ironic that in the movie it was green - not brown or red like the current fake meats - because the green color implies that it's from vegetable sources (pea protein? that would be green, at least when the peas are fresh)... only made from people, just like in the '73 movie. (Back when vegetarians were an anomaly, and meat eaters were the norm)



OMG - I just googled the movie to refresh my memory about it. Not only is the green used on the posters a bright pea green, one of the movie posters said the year the movie was depicting was 2022.



Even the suggestion at this point in time of using human remains for compost is science fiction taking a horrifying step along the way to becoming fact.



[ETA: "Soylent Green is people!"]



Ugh, I've really creeped myself out here...
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 09:20
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doreen T doreen T is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benay
One of the news stories I posted on Twitter came out from a Canadian press story.

British Columbia was considering using human remains as a component of their compost production.

I have heard nothing since about this plan so don't know if the BC legislators went ahead with its approval

Imagine having human remains in your back yard garden or in the fields of soybeans and potatoes.

Interesting concept

I wonder of the BC department of health nixed the idea

Human composting has already been legalized in Washington state, and is currently under consideration in other jurisdictions across US and Canada, including BC. The process differs from "green burial" where the non-embalmed body is buried au naturel in a permanent plot. What can and can't be done with composted human remains falls under the same laws and regulation as cremated remains .. possibly even stricter. Read more here .. A green death: Is human composting or natural burial for you?.

No convoys of trucks laden with human corpses to be made into Soylent Green .. or food fertilizer That is vegan propaganda at its worst, IMO . If vegans are worried about their food being grown in animal remains, it's already being done .. not just manure, but also composted livestock (intentional) and decomposed wildlife (accidental) that are hacked and chopped to bits by machinery during tillage, planting and harvesting processes. But to suggest human remains will be used in commercial agriculture is science fiction at best, and scare-mongering at worst.

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Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 18:57
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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I'd hate for my remains to be used to grow soy.
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 20:01
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Soylent green is probably healthier than soy.
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 20:51
Verbena Verbena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
Soylent green is probably healthier than soy.


As we know, how the food source was raised, and the quality of the fertilizer (for plants), and feed (for animals) is important for the final quality of the food produced. You may be right that Soylent green would be healthier than soy, but not by much, given the quality of "feed" for the animals used. Especially down the road, when the "feed" to produce soylent green is, in fact, soylent green.
Because we may know that soylent green "is people", but we also know, not entirely; high tech is in there too. Certainly not just sustainably-raised-free-range-species-specific-properly-fed people.

ETA: Sorry, just took in the title of this thread. Soylent green is obviously NOT vegan.
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Jan-26-20, 21:10
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verbena
...
ETA: Sorry, just took in the title of this thread. Soylent green is obviously NOT vegan.

It has to be vegan if the people were vegans!
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Jan-27-20, 03:17
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
It has to be vegan if the people were vegans!


Nope. We are animals, so it would be Impossible People!

Which, they are.
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Jan-27-20, 18:01
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
I'd hate for my remains to be used to grow soy.

I'd like to be buried at sea so the crabs and other critters can at least make some use of my discarded body.
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Jan-28-20, 05:54
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Crazy week at work, with meetings disrupting my flow. So I ran upstairs between breakfast and lunch to get the chef to do me a double portion of bacon with three eggs scrambled in butter. I do try to time my off-menu requests for when they aren't busy, and they appreciate it.

So, this guy is kinda new, and he really finds vegans annoying. He said, "I don't mind cooking your stuff because the kitchens set up for it and I don't want you to be sick. But they get so ridiculously fussy I just say I guess I can't cook for them."
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Jan-28-20, 07:27
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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Related anecdotes from the Fathead blog of Tom Naughton:

https://www.fathead-movie.com/index...t-free-edition/
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