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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 00:54
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF/IF
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Default Americans Keep Getting Smarter About Sugar

Quote:
October 11, 2018

Americans Keep Getting Smarter About Sugar

We still eat way too much sugar and other sweeteners, but continuing declines in consumption are testament to the fact that people really can learn.



Per-capita consumption of sugar and other caloric sweeteners was down in the U.S. in 2017 for the third straight year — and 13th out of the past 18. And this time, consumption of refined sugar, which had been rising over the past decade as consumers (and soft-drink makers) turned away from high-fructose corn sweeteners, fell as well.

The 2017 numbers, which the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a few weeks ago but haven’t gotten much attention yet, aren’t really big news in the sense that they overturn an established narrative. There had already been talk of a global “sugar glut” brought on by booming production in Asia, ebbing demand in developed countries, and slowing demand growth in emerging markets. It’s also clear from the above chart that the decline in overall sweetener use in the U.S. began a while ago (I’ve written about it before) and has actually slowed somewhat in recent years.

Still, it is continuing to decline, which strikes me as a great victory in this age of distrust of scientific knowledge and widespread sentiment that everything is getting worse. Added sugar, broadly defined (that is, including corn syrup and the lot), is probably bad for you in anything but quite small doses. Yes, there have been other foods described by experts as bad over the past 50 years (fat and eggs spring to mind) that have turned out not to be, but — while there do seem to be concerns that treating sugar in isolation is misleading — the evidence linking high sugar consumption to obesity and a range of other maladies is pretty overwhelming. And whaddya know: People have been responding by … eating less sugar.

Obviously it’s not all the result of individuals reading or hearing about the health risks of sugar and choosing to forego it. A few cities have penalized sugar consumption with soft-drink taxes, while some food manufacturers have reformulated products to use less of the stuff. We may see many more such moves before 2020, when new Food and Drug Administration rules — delayed by the Donald Trump administration but apparently given the go-ahead this year — require food labels to include information on added sugars.

Sugar consumption also varies by region and by socioeconomic group. The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is highest in the South, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and is also higher among low-income Americans. On the other hand, a 2016 study found that the decline in sugar consumption since the early 2000s has crossed socioeconomic lines.

U.S. sugar consumption does still have an awfully long way to fall. As of 2013, according to the most recent data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the U.S. led the world in per-capita sugar consumption (Malta and Switzerland came in second and third). The American Heart Association’s current recommended daily added sugar limit is 36 grams for men and 25 for women. The per-capita 2017 numbers reported by the USDA come out to almost 159 grams a day.

The agency does not actually monitor how much sugar we put in our bodies; it measures “estimated deliveries for domestic food and beverage use” and divides it by the population. But surveys in which people are asked about their sugar consumption show similar trends. Those trends are headed in the right direction, and let us for the moment just be thankful for that.






https://www.bloomberg.com/view/arti...rth-celebrating
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 09:58
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NewRuth NewRuth is offline
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Default

Quote:
The per-capita 2017 numbers reported by the USDA come out to almost 159 grams a day.


That's .795 cups or 3/4 of a cup plus 2 teaspoons. Every day. Wow.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 10:36
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewRuth
That's .795 cups or 3/4 of a cup plus 2 teaspoons. Every day. Wow.


Somebody's eating my 3/4+ cup - I'm sure not! The hummingbirds have gone south so they're not getting it.

The small bag of generic sugar is on sale this week. I was thinking of buying it for next year's hummingbirds, but that might mess up the numbers. Maybe I should just plant more flowers for the hummers.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 11:40
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mike_d mike_d is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
Somebody's eating my 3/4+ cup - I'm sure not! The hummingbirds have gone south so they're not getting it.
Some of mine are still hanging around -- there are many different types that migrate at different times. The cold front Sunday may trigger the rest to leave. They consume a LOT!

The thing many miss about sugar is starch too, a bowl of cornflakes is essentially a bowl of sugar even before sugar and skim-milk are added. Skim-milk has the same impact on BG as soda pop.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 11:55
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Default

My hummingbirds visit the hundreds of flowers that bloom here-- mostly weeds, but he hummingbirds love them so they stay. I cant imagine sugar water is any better for them than us. Nectar is far more complex than just sugar.

The article-- rather poorly written. Makes me appreciate the teachers my teens currently have.

Some one else is eating my families share of the sugars.

As for the South--IMO high sugar consumption is far more complex than socio-economic. Im betting lots of sugar came in from the islands that produce the sugar cane, allowing the cheap sugar to became a staple in foods like the sweet tea.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Oct-12-18, 18:14
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Default

If I remember correctly, Taubes often cited the figure of 70lbs/year/person (~87g/day) of combined sugar and wheat over 20 years, then the cluster of diseases appear. If the 2017 figures for sugar alone is already at 159g/day/person, we're way past that 70lbs combined mark, at 127lbs/year just for sugar.

Since this is a per-capita figure, some of us must eat a boatload of sugar, while many of us here for example barely eat any, never mind the wheat. I have to wonder what kind of "diet" this would be. On the other hand, what better way to adhere to official guidelines about the 300g/carbs/day than to eat the pure stuff, right? 300g/carbs/day is 241/lbs/year, about 3.5x the 70lbs/year figure.
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Oct-13-18, 18:36
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,310
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
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Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
Default

Quote:
Fruit doesn't contain table sugar, so it's misleading to use sugar cubes to show the sugar content. Fruit is natural and healthy, how dare you compare it with Pop Tarts!
http://www.sugarstacks.com/blog/

How many sugar cubes? Most fruits contain about 6!
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