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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 06:08
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Vegans 40% more likely to suffer a bone fracture

Vegans 40% more likely to suffer a bone fracture

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...cture-rzb2bj06l

Quote:
Vegans who forgo all foods derived from animals have a far higher risk of broken bones than people who eat meat and fish, a study has shown.

The findings, by Oxford University researchers, have raised concerns that a recent increase in the popularity of veganism will cause health problems unless adherents plan their diets. The NHS advises vegans to think carefully about how they obtain enough calcium, iron and vitamin B12.

The number of vegans in Britain more than doubled to 600,000 between 2016 and 2019, according to surveys by the Vegan Society published this year. Food manufacturers have responded by creating scores of plant products designed to mimic red meat, such as vegan sausage rolls and burgers that “bleed” with beetroot juice.

Other surveys suggest that most new vegans cite better health as a reason for giving up animal products. But vegans were found to have a 43 per cent higher risk of suffering a bone fracture than meat-eaters, according to a paper today in the journal BMC Medicine.

The study involved nearly 55,000 people in Britain, about 2,000 of whom were vegan. It followed them for an average of 18 years each.

Tammy Tong, nutritional epidemiologist at the Nuffield Department of Population Health at Oxford University and the lead author, said: “We found that vegans had a higher risk of total fractures, which resulted in close to 20 more cases per 1,000 people over a ten-year period compared to people who ate meat.”

The researchers also found a link between vegetarianism, in which eggs and dairy products can be eaten, and pescatarians, who eat fish but no meat, and the chances of people in their forties breaking a hip. Plant-based diets have increased in popularity and surveys suggest that most adherents believe they are a healthier choice.

Eating more vegetables and less red meat has been linked to improved blood pressure, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and better cholesterol readings. Conservationists say that it is better for the environment too.

The study found that vegans were more than 2.3 times more likely to suffer a broken hip than people who ate red meat. Vegetarians and pescatarians were about 25 per cent more likely. The results suggest that over ten years vegans suffer about 15 more hip fractures than meat eaters for every 1,000 people.

Dr Tong said: “This study showed that vegans, who on average had a lower [body mass index] as well as lower intakes of calcium and protein than meat eaters, had higher risks of fractures at several sites. Well-balanced and predominantly plant-based diets can result in improved nutrient levels and have been linked to lower risks of diseases including heart disease and diabetes. Individuals should take into account the benefits and risks of their diet, and ensure that they have adequate levels of calcium and protein and maintain a healthy body mass index.”

The average age of the meat eaters in the study was about 50, for vegans and vegetarians it was about 40 and for the fish eaters it was 42.

The research was a prospective cohort study, monitoring a group over time to understand how certain factors, in this case diet, may be linked to an outcome such as a broken bone.

The trend towards vegan diets led to 3.6 million fewer animals being consumed in the first six months of last year, analysis by the charity Veganuary found. Supermarket sales of red meat fell by £185 million last year, more than any other category, according to Nielsen, the data management company.

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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 07:51
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Very disturbing to see such a significant increase in bone fractures due to avoiding beef and similar meats. That info offered concrete data from studies.

On the other hand this info did not, and is very weak .

Quote:
Eating more vegetables and less red meat has been linked to improved blood pressure, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and better cholesterol readings. Conservationists say that it is better for the environment too


From personal experience cutting carbs drives down bp, and dr fung and others use vlc to control diabetes.

As a sheep raiser, grazing cattle and sheep is BETTER for the environment. Their vague statement is misleading. Feedlot style production has many problems but the increasing demand for meat due to an increasing population will need the feedlot operations.

Or. 100,000 head dairy operation planned by Russia to supply China. That was announced a couple years ago, but I've not heard if it's up and running

Small operations with a few head per farm , like a family cow, doesn't have the negative impact.

Food for thought.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 11:07
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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This is developing into a fur fight (yes, intended). Statements volleyed by both sides seem to focus on disease resolution, and that's likely, but I can attest to the fact that since I went strict low carb eating primarily meat, and of that meat, primarily red meat, my BP has normalized, my sleep apnea has resolved, my skin tags shriveled and disappeared years ago, my blood lipid scores recently have been good, my inflammation scores using hsCRP have consistently been 0.4 with anything 1.0 and below being an excellent score, and I require no meds of any kind. Yes, initially the doctors were amazed, but I wasn't, and now they're coming around to understanding the ability to achieve health through eating lifestyle.
Quote:
"Eating more vegetables and less red meat has been linked to improved blood pressure, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and better cholesterol readings."

Maybe some can do this as vegans or vegetarians, but the additional supplements required to keep one at optimum health requires focused attention and high maintenance. Humans have evolved as omnivores and nutrient dense foods (meat, fish) are most healthy. I respect those who feel an ethical push to not eat animals, but they need to learn, understand, and limit the shortcomings of their WOE.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 12:59
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Rob, thanks for mentioning the loss of skin tags.....a rarely mentioned benefit/ sign of controling blood sugar.

IMHO, quality beef is the key. Grassfed, least accumulation of pesticides and herbacides..... Gmo corn and gmo soy is typical feed of livestock in US.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-20, 13:01
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thud123 thud123 is online now
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Maybe the Vegans were simply more active, like running, jumping and playing about - I've only broken bones having fun, never sitting on the internet trying to make sense of confusing studies.

But who knows - there might be some truth in there somewhere!
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Nov-24-20, 11:14
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Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
I gave up veganism – and the science says other midlifers should too

Instagram influencers may claim it will save the planet and cleanse the body, but research suggests veganism isn't the holy grail of health

Flic Everett


If your GP prescribed a diet which carried twice your current risk of breaking a bone, would you happily stock up on the ingredients? Or might you wonder why on earth anyone would adopt an eating regime that requires specialist shopping and NASA levels of nutritional knowledge, whilst threatening a skeleton as brittle as winter twigs?

This week, research was published suggesting that vegans are at almost twice the risk of broken bones as meat-eaters. As yet, it’s unclear whether that’s because vegan diets tend to lack calcium and protein, or due to the fact that vegans tend to be thinner and have less padding to break their fall. The long-term study also began in 1993, when vegan products were less available and unfortified – now, an entire industry is dedicated to adding supplements to animal-free products and the average vegan has a full supermarket aisle, rather than a dusty Tupperware stack, to choose from.

Still, to “follow the science”, it’s increasingly apparent that a vegan diet isn’t necessarily healthy, unless it’s meticulously planned to include fortified foods and milks, added vitamins and bonus omega-3 capsules. Yes, it can help to stave off certain cancers and heart disease, but it can also cause weak bones, exhaustion, anaemia and severe vitamin B deficiency – a factor in dementia.

I know all this because for three years I was a committed vegan. I was editing a vegan food magazine, and had access to all the nutritional information out there. But I was also busy, and failed to eat like a celebrity with a dedicated macrobiotic chef and a nutritional analysis app. As a result, I developed a severe nickel allergy and permanent exhaustion.

As a peri-menopausal woman, my diet was doing me no good and, after a headmistress-y lecture from one of the many specialists I visited in search of a diagnosis, I introduced sustainable fish and dairy again. Even a pescatarian diet carries a 25 per cent higher risk of broken bones, according to the study, but as a bleeding heart animal lover who doesn’t want to destroy the planet (and went vegetarian in 2005), reverting to a full meat diet feels impossible. Increasingly, however, purely for health reasons, I’m wondering if I should.

Yet despite the ongoing scientific studies suggesting that pure veganism is not the nutritional holy grail, one look at social media suggests that if, we all turned vegan overnight, not only would the planet immediately be saved but we’d all live to be powerfully bendy centenarians on a “rainbow” diet of grains and vegetables.

Over the last few years, the number of vegan recipe accounts has expanded like chia seeds in water (actually, they make a revolting gel, like slick frogspawn, despite featuring in every other recipe).

While some suggested dishes are carefully planned to include protein and vitamins, there are thousands where visual appeal is prioritized over any health benefits, with endless streams of “Buddha bowls” – a collection of disparate grains, pulses and vegetables that have apparently achieved zen by not including meat or dairy.

Then there’s ersatz vegan replicas of mainstream dishes, like tofu “fish”, eggless pancakes and whipped fake cream, “facon” sandwiches... few ever question whether a constant diet of either replacement foods or pure vegetables is healthy; the very fact of its moral goodness is enough to garner strings of approving heart-emojis.

It would be fine if these were just useful suggestions for eating less meat (I am all for that). But many of the Insta-influencers promote themselves as nutritionists, dispensing well-meaning advice and health wisdom, which often directly contradicts qualified dietitians.

It’s also a fact that most of these glowing chickpea-gobblers are under 35, and too young to feel the effects of any nutritional loss. For those of us chugging into our 50s, however, particularly women, a balanced diet has never been more vital, as menopause weakens muscles and thins bones.

When I consider what constitutes a good diet now, I often think of my grandma, who sailed through middle age slim and fit, and lived healthily to 87. Her post-war diet involved plenty of home-made chicken soup, daily fish or meat and veg, not many puddings and a gin and tonic every night. We don’t yet know how the recent veganism boom will affect our health long-term, but as I age, I’m inclined to listen to experts rather than a gorgeous 23-year-old grinning over a plate of roasted quinoa.

In my heart, I’d love to be vegan again. But my body isn’t so keen – and increasingly, it seems that hoary old recommendation “everything in moderation” is the best diet advice there is.



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...cience-instead/
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Nov-24-20, 12:19
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thud123 thud123 is online now
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Quote:
This week, research was published suggesting that vegans are at almost twice the risk of broken bones as meat-eaters. As yet, it’s unclear whether that’s because vegan diets tend to lack calcium and protein, or due to the fact that vegans tend to be thinner and have less padding to break their fall. The long-term study also began in 1993, when vegan products were less available and unfortified – now, an entire industry is dedicated to adding supplements to animal-free products and the average vegan has a full supermarket aisle, rather than a dusty Tupperware stack, to choose from.

Yep, lots of confounders. The science of diet is H.A.R.D! So many variables and the time scales are like aeons - that shouldn't keep us from trying, just keep us from drawing definitive conclusions too quickly
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Nov-25-20, 02:03
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Ambulo Ambulo is offline
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I really understand where Flic Everett is coming from. I never quite made it to veganism, but was lacto-ovo-vegetarian for many years. From an ethical perspective I would be so happy if it were true that veganism was the best, healthiest diet for humans and would be prepared to give up foods I enjoy. But we live in a morally distasteful universe, it's like a strand of The Problem of Evil discussion.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Dec-19-20, 06:25
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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I don't know how I started out, but after decades of dutifully "eating healthy" I can now lead a normal life only by eliminating all sources of lectins (which includes gluten) as much as possible.

On top of that daunting challenge, I am continually informed that my "radical fad diet" eliminates all nutrient sources and I'm going to die from it. No one asks me how my autoimmune condition is doing, because they wouldn't like the answer. It is in remission, thank you.

If they had it their way, I'd be on dangerous drugs I can't afford. And people (except the likes of ourselves) are still ignoring Dr. Terry Wahls, who started out singing praises for vegetables and now advises that people KETO as much as they can stand.

We can't make up our own science.

Last edited by WereBear : Sat, Dec-19-20 at 06:31.
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