Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Daily Low-Carb Support > General Low-Carb
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 07:46
lowjax's Avatar
lowjax lowjax is offline
Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: HP/MF/LC
Stats: 265/228.4/199 Male 5' 5"
BF:
Progress: 55%
Location: The Land of Cheese
Default

I found you all! My fellow veggie rotters and composters!

I'm tired of buying veggies that just go bad in the fridge. I've been moving to more protein and less veggies and that's only exacerbating the issue.

I do love many veggies and even enjoy a good salad now and then, but it doesn't stack up to a nice steak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
The crisper drawer in my fridge has been repurposed and is now the cheese drawer.


Our old fridge had 2 crisper drawers and one had turned into my cheese drawer as well.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #17   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 08:35
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,786
 
Plan: P:E/DDF/LC-DrWestman
Stats: 225/161/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 114%
Location: NC
Default

This morning on Ted Naiman's Twitter, someone commented about the Carnivores telling him he needed more fat, suet, butter.

Ted's response:
Join us! ☺︎ we have green stuff. (followed by all the green veg emojis)
Reply With Quote
  #18   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 09:37
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,638
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
It occurred to me just now that I do have vegetables I get along with, even love. The kicker is they are not widely considered to vegetables. They are botanical fruits.

Cucumbers and avocados are staples of my new eating plan. I also get along with tomato sauce -- despite their nightshade heritage -- because sauce doesn't contain the lectin-containing skins and seeds. (Finally! Something breaks my way!)

Both cucumbers and avocados are excellent salad ingredients. I can do all kinds of dressings on cucumbers, and I have a mandolin if it comes to that I guess it's time to move beyond pickles.

I love a good salad with a mixture of greens and protein. Last night the salad was Boston lettuce with hamburgers cubed dressed with olive oil and ACV. Good stuff. Avocados and cucumbers are also regulars as well.
Reply With Quote
  #19   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 13:24
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,269
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
This morning on Ted Naiman's Twitter, someone commented about the Carnivores telling him he needed more fat, suet, butter.

Ted's response:
Join us! ☺︎ we have green stuff. (followed by all the green veg emojis)


I'm the first paragraph. I do well with lots of fat, what most would consider too much protein, and very few carbs. I also have to avoid fiber and lectins, which eliminates 98% of the vegetable kingdom, so it's no wonder I'm at the other end of the scale.

It just points up how there isn't ONE healthy diet, and attempts to make that happen have been so disastrous.
Reply With Quote
  #20   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 14:05
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,638
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I love a good salad with a mixture of greens and protein. Last night the salad was Boston lettuce with hamburgers cubed dressed with olive oil and ACV. Good stuff. Avocados and cucumbers are also regulars as well.

Quoting myself here . . . .

I'm not driven to add a lot of vegetables, and while I considered carnivore for a brief period, I'm also not one driven to chase micronutrients increasing vegetables, as I believe they come with benefits that are very individualized. If it tastes good, like an occasional salad, very occasional berries, avocados, cukes, and sometimes cruciferous family members, that's about my sphere in non-protein dominated whole foods. Naiman's rant on processed food was hilarious. I consider bread processed food. Some might think that's hilarious.
Reply With Quote
  #21   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-21, 15:53
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,269
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

I used to take vegetables more seriously. Then I discovered the work of Dr. Georgia Ede:

Quote:
My Story
For decades I followed a low-fat, low-cholesterol, high-fiber, low-calorie diet and exercised regularly. In 2007, as I entered my 40s, I developed a number of perplexing health problems including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, migraines, and IBS. After seeing a variety of Harvard specialists who ordered a host of specialized tests and found nothing wrong, I decided to experiment with my diet. After about six months of trial and error, I was symptom-free.

The unorthodox diet I had stumbled upon was almost the exact opposite of what we are told is healthy for us: a high-fat, high-cholesterol, low-fiber diet consisting primarily of meat, seafood and poultry, with very few plant foods. Not only had this strange way of eating resolved all of my mysterious ailments, it also improved my mood, energy, and concentration. This surprising experience led me on a quest to understand nutrition science (a topic sadly not taught in medical school) and the intersection between diet and mental health (a topic sadly not taught in psychiatry residency training programs). I have now been incorporating nutrition principles into my clinical practice for over a decade.


Through her work, I was astonished that those tons-o-nutrients I was continually assured brimmed in those healthy vegetables were not nearly as bio-available as laboratory tests would indicate. And since I already knew I was not a candidate for getting my protein from plant sources, this made complete sense to me.

If we look at people who lived for many centuries in places with short growing seasons, more suited to herding than farming, then it would be no wonder that such people would want to get their nutrients from meat and dairy. As my body seems to prefer.
Reply With Quote
  #22   ^
Old Sun, Feb-28-21, 16:29
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,708
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
Default

I do what I call lazy keto. I've been doing it a long time because I used to call it lazy Atkins induction.

Fewer than 2k calories and twice as much fat as protein. Easy-peasy; no need to count micronutrients or follow some complicated diet plan.

I seldom eat any salad greens at all. Mostly it's cheese, meat, nuts, fish, cream, olives, with occasional flax, millet, or coconut.

No chicken and only occasional egg yolks because without them my former arthritis/bursitis is completely gone (I have the arthritis/bursitis diet a doc gave me, if interested, let me know).

Supplemented with a lot of water, a few cups of coffee and/or tea (with organic heavy whipping cream) and an occasional glass of red wine (no more than one 4oz glass per day).

Since I don't eat hardly any fruit or veggies, I take supplements that have fruit and veggie extracts. (Life Extension Mix with Extra Niacin.)

I'm 74 years old, on zero medications, and a heart/circulatory system of a 50 year old according to a heart doc. I guess I don't need the greens. It's obviously working for me - YMMV

Bob

The crisper is full of imported European cheese, Cheddar, Havarti, Brie, Pecorino Romano, Parmigiano-Reggiano, Gouda, Provolone, Edam, Scamorza (when I can find it), Alpine Swiss, Asiago, Mascarpone, Mozzarella (especially di bufala), etc. European cheese because it's from A2 cows and my DW is intolerant to A1 dairy. Plus the Euro-cheese isn't saturated with synthetic hormones. I tend to shy away from part-skim cheese - the taste is in the fat.
Reply With Quote
  #23   ^
Old Mon, Mar-01-21, 04:32
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,269
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

I "indulge" in grass-fed cheese. I'm fortunate to have a few local farms, even one with goats!

It's expensive, but also, much more tasty and satiating. I think I break even that way.
Reply With Quote
  #24   ^
Old Mon, Mar-01-21, 06:32
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,537
 
Plan: Kendall & Naiman
Stats: 212/191/170 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 50%
Location: Rural Maine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
Fewer than 2k calories and twice as much fat as protein. Easy-peasy; no need to count micronutrients or follow some complicated diet plan.

This just goes to show that even though we're all the same species, there is an amazing amount of variability in how our bodies work and tolerate different things. There are no absolutes across the board.
Reply With Quote
  #25   ^
Old Tue, Mar-02-21, 04:56
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,269
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

This experiment is pretty solid, though completely counter-intuitive.

Salad greens were making me hungry.

I can more reliably eat one meal a day -- which is dependent on whether I'm hungry or not -- if I skip the greens.

They are low fiber and low lectin... though perhaps not as much as meat, eggs, and cheese. Yes, I could be that sensitive.

I haven't gone wrong yet assuming I am SUPER SENSITIVE, so there we are. Doesn't mean I'll never eat a salad again, but it's off my list of staples.

One thing about this evolving eating plan -- inspired by Dr. Terry Wahl's keto protocol for Multiple Schlerosis -- is how eating out is so much less practical and appealing. Right now, of course, that doesn't mean anything but it is fun and a way my friends tend to meet each other. So the salad option is not that bad and not that weird.

Still, between the seed oils, the gluten factor, and the general carbiness out there, it's just not something I can do for fun very often. And, you know, enjoy it.
Reply With Quote
  #26   ^
Old Tue, Mar-02-21, 10:37
lowjax's Avatar
lowjax lowjax is offline
Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: HP/MF/LC
Stats: 265/228.4/199 Male 5' 5"
BF:
Progress: 55%
Location: The Land of Cheese
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
The crisper is full of imported European cheese, Cheddar, Havarti, Brie, Pecorino Romano, Parmigiano-Reggiano, Gouda, Provolone, Edam, Scamorza (when I can find it), Alpine Swiss, Asiago, Mascarpone, Mozzarella (especially di bufala), etc. European cheese because it's from A2 cows and my DW is intolerant to A1 dairy. Plus the Euro-cheese isn't saturated with synthetic hormones. I tend to shy away from part-skim cheese - the taste is in the fat.


Bob - Thanks for this note. It reminded me that I had read something about A1 vs A2, but that was years ago and I don't remember it. Need to dig into it.

Your cheese list looks amazing!
Reply With Quote
  #27   ^
Old Tue, Mar-02-21, 16:54
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,708
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
Default

Most USA cheese is A1 which has a genetic mutation which results in one of the amino acids which turn which should be a proline but instead is a histidine. Your body turns that into a histimine which is of course what people take antihistamines for when they get an allergic reaction.

Some of the A1 reactions are lactose intolerance and in my DW's case, black eyes.

I did find some USA whey protein powder made from Jersey cows, which are all A2 cows. It's a bit more expensive, doesn't mix as easily (needs more stirring) but has higher BCAA's and doesn't make my DW's eyes black.

The thing is in the USA the Holstein A1 cows simply give more milk so they are the most profitable for the farmers.

I suppose if you don't have an intolerance to the histidines the differences would be minimal (just guessing, I've not researched this).

I found out about this by accident. In 2018 we took a 5 week vacation in a small camper van in Australia. My DW figured that since we wouldn't run into any of our friends down there, she would suffer the black eyes to enjoy cheese and real cream in her coffee. But she didn't get black eyes and when we found that out, we enjoyed a lot of great Australian cheese.

When we got home, I tried organic cheese, guessing that the rBGH that US commercial cows are often fed to increase their milk output might be to blame. (They don't give the cows rBGH in Australia). No luck.

Further research turned up the A2 vs A1 difference, and now my DW can share cheese and butter (Kerry Gold grass fed) with me.

The Euro-dairy costs a little more, but it's worth it. So does 100% grass-fed beef and organics. But without your health, you have nothing. The richest dying person in the world can only buy a better coffin.

So to us, the object is to stay as healthy as possible.

My DW likes some greens, so I buy organic for her. I mostly pass on the greens but I'm glad she can enjoy them. The extra money is worth it because it reduces the chances of her getting seriously sick. This is entirely selfish, because I absolutely love her in my life. 42 years and I'm still smitten with her. She's beautiful, intelligent, creative, talented, kind, has a great sense of humor, and is my very best friend (and more).

Many of the greens are in the 'dirty dozen' for pesticide contamination. We call them pesticides, but they are biocides. They kill everything, it's just we don't get enough in one dose to kill our larger bodies outright. But they can still damage our DNA and slowly shorten our lives and quality of life.

If I need to save money, I'll save it somewhere else, not on our food.
Reply With Quote
  #28   ^
Old Tue, Mar-02-21, 21:30
lowjax's Avatar
lowjax lowjax is offline
Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: HP/MF/LC
Stats: 265/228.4/199 Male 5' 5"
BF:
Progress: 55%
Location: The Land of Cheese
Default

Thank you so much for the info, Bob. I do appreciate it.

I had a somewhat similar experience when I left home. I grew up on a dairy farm that was all natural. No growth hormones, free pasture, etc. I always drank a lot of raw cows milk when I went off to college, I started getting stomach aches from milk. I went back home in the summer and the stomach aches went away. It was the milk from large dairies that went through the whole processing process that caused an issue. Milk from my dad's farm didn't cause an issue at all.
Reply With Quote
  #29   ^
Old Wed, Mar-03-21, 01:30
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,269
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
Many of the greens are in the 'dirty dozen' for pesticide contamination. We call them pesticides, but they are biocides. They kill everything, it's just we don't get enough in one dose to kill our larger bodies outright. But they can still damage our DNA and slowly shorten our lives and quality of life.


And that's another good reason to be wary of vegetables. And I used to get only organic greens from local farms, but the Pandemic disrupted that.

As always, a work in progress.
Reply With Quote
  #30   ^
Old Wed, Mar-03-21, 13:31
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,708
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 235/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 128%
Location: Florida
Default

The problem with corporate farming is that there is often more concern about quarterly profits for the stockholders and board of directors than there is about anything else.

A small family farm just needs to make enough money to make ends meet and keep up with inflation.

A corporate farm needs all of the above plus million dollar salaries to the board of directors plus quarterly profits that need to be more than the last quarters which need to be more than before so the stockholders who have no participation in the company can make a profit. If the corporate farm doesn't make more and more and more, the stockholders will 'jump ship'. Perpetual growth is impossible in a closed system, so the corporate farm has to cut corners somewhere, and that is too often in the quality of the food.

Of course, in today's world, we can't entirely boycott corporate food companies, but we can be careful about what we purchase.

We purchase local Florida raised 100% grass-fed beef, support local farmers, but still need to go to the grocery store. We get very little ultra-processed food, if any at all.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:44.


Copyright © 2000-2021 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.