Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sun, Mar-03-24, 10:07
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,886
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default Yogurts can now make limited claim that they lower type 2 diabetes risk, FDA says

Quote:
Yogurts can now make limited claim that they lower type 2 diabetes risk, FDA says

In a decision nearly five years in the making, the US Food and Drug Administration has decided that yogurts can now make a limited claim that the food may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, the federal agency concluded Friday.

The decision marks the first-ever qualified health claim the federal agency has issued for yogurt.

Qualified health claims “are supported by scientific evidence, but do not meet the more rigorous ‘significant scientific agreement’ standard required for an authorized health claim,” according to the FDA. “To ensure that these claims are not misleading, they must be accompanied by a disclaimer or other qualifying language to accurately communicate to consumers the level of scientific evidence supporting the claim.”

In the case of yogurt, the claim states that according to limited scientific evidence, “eating yogurt regularly, at least 2 cups (3 servings) per week,” may reduce risk of the disease that affects about 38 million people in the US and roughly 462 million individuals worldwide.

Underpinning the serving size recommendation is the FDA’s conclusion that, based on two prospective cohorts evaluated in high-quality studies, the specific amount is the minimum necessary to achieve the claimed effect.

Made from milk fermented with the bacteria, or probiotics, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, yogurt is rich in calcium, protein, B vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.


The move comes in response to a 2018 petition submitted by food and beverage company Danone North America. The submission set in motion an FDA review of existing research on the relationships between yogurt and type 2 diabetes, according to a news release.

“The petition to allow a qualified health claim related to type 2 diabetes to appear on yogurt labels followed the appropriate steps and included peer-reviewed research to support their petition,” said Dr. Caroline Passerrello, a registered dietitian nutritionist and an instructor in the University of Pittsburgh’s school of health and rehabilitation sciences, via email.

But in addition to the supporting research being limited, it’s also “not very strong,” Passerrello added. “The way the studies were conducted means we can’t really say for sure there is a causal relationship, but more of a correlation between type 2 diabetes and yogurt.”

CNN has reached out to the FDA for comment.

Qualified health claims have been allowed by the FDA for dietary supplements since 2000 and for food since 2002, but they are rarely announced. In the past decade, only 10 foods have been allowed to be sold with such claims — including high-flavonol cocoa powder for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, and certain cranberry products for lowered odds of recurrent urinary tract infections among women.

Dr. Marion Nestle, a nutritionist and molecular biologist, echoed Passerrello’s sentiments, adding that “qualified health claims are ridiculous on their face.”

“Why would any sensible person think that all you have to do to prevent type 2 diabetes is eat 2 cups of yogurt a week?” said Nestle, the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, via email. “All we can hope is that the yogurt is at least unsweetened, but since it’s really hard to find unsweetened yogurt, this is telling people who want to avoid type 2 diabetes that sweetened yogurts are good for them.”

“According to the FDA’s review of the studies, the amount of sugar in the yogurt made no difference to the results,” Nestle added. “Therefore, according to the FDA, sugar is a non-issue.”

Any yogurts can make this limited claim as long as they use the exact wording specified by the FDA, Nestle added. High consumption of added sugar has been linked with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in multiple studies.

Adding to the dubiousness of the claim is the reality that the cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial, so even though yogurt can be part of a healthy, weight-maintaining diet, “to expect yogurt on its own to be causally associated with diabetes prevention makes no sense out of the context of the diet as a whole,” Nestle said.

In this context, when evaluating the health claims of products to make the best choices for your diet and health status, using “common sense” is critical, Nestle added.

Previous research has suggested limiting added sugar intake to less than 25 grams, or about 6 teaspoons, per day. That’s equivalent to about 2 ½ chocolate chip cookies, 16 ounces of fruit punch or around 1 ½ tablespoons of honey.


https://www.cnn.com/2024/03/01/heal...ness/index.html
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Sun, Mar-03-24, 10:31
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,886
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

I hadn't realized that there was such a thing as "limited claim" that allowed food manufacturers to print on their labels, but it certainly explains the origins of heart-healthy claims on cheerios and oatmeal.

Quote:
Qualified health claims have been allowed by the FDA for dietary supplements since 2000 and for food since 2002, but they are rarely announced. In the past decade, only 10 foods have been allowed to be sold with such claims — including high-flavonol cocoa powder for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, and certain cranberry products for lowered odds of recurrent urinary tract infections among women.

Dr. Marion Nestle, a nutritionist and molecular biologist, echoed Passerrello’s sentiments, adding that “qualified health claims are ridiculous on their face.”

“Why would any sensible person think that all you have to do to prevent type 2 diabetes is eat 2 cups of yogurt a week?”
said Nestle, the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, via email. “All we can hope is that the yogurt is at least unsweetened, but since it’s really hard to find unsweetened yogurt, this is telling people who want to avoid type 2 diabetes that sweetened yogurts are good for them.”

“According to the FDA’s review of the studies, the amount of sugar in the yogurt made no difference to the results,” Nestle added. “Therefore, according to the FDA, sugar is a non-issue.”

Any yogurts can make this limited claim as long as they use the exact wording specified by the FDA, Nestle added.


This makes no sense at all - sugar is one of the primary triggers for diabetes, but somehow 2 cups/week of the highest sugar yogurt on the market can now claim to prevent diabetes.

And that means that the general public will have such confidence in their 2 cups of (15-30 g of added sugar per 5 oz serving) yogurt every week that they can eat all the M&Ms, Chips Ahoy, Dunkin' Donuts, Lucky Charms, McD's fries, and Doritos they want and believe the very fact that they ate yogurt will allow them to avoid ever getting diabetes!
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Sun, Mar-03-24, 14:54
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,038
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

You’re right, Calianna, this is nonsense brought forth by a food manufacturer trying to get the right to show labeling on the containers that tout the product as healthy to sell more products. Dannon has a vested interest in this. Similar to cereal concoctions with labels advertising “Heart Healthy.” It’s laughable.

Quote:
”Why would any sensible person think that all you have to do to prevent type 2 diabetes is eat 2 cups of yogurt a week?” said Nestle, the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, via email. “All we can hope is that the yogurt is at least unsweetened, but since it’s really hard to find unsweetened yogurt, this is telling people who want to avoid type 2 diabetes that sweetened yogurts are good for them.”


Kinda says all you need to know.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Mon, Mar-04-24, 07:35
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,762
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/167/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 116%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

I wonder what studies the FDA reviewed. I bet they were all done by companies that sell yogurt.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Mon, Mar-04-24, 11:50
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 19,210
 
Plan: atkins, carnivore 2023
Stats: 200/211/163 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: -30%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Can meat make the same claim???

All marketing ploys. Disappointing.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 04:21
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 14,662
 
Plan: EpiPaleo/Primal/LowOx
Stats: 220/125/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 136%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Can meat make the same claim???


But actual food producers don't have the money or megalomania to create food fads, base their meals on children's movies, and fund slanted studies.

Quote:
“According to the FDA’s review of the studies, the amount of sugar in the yogurt made no difference to the results,” Nestle added. “Therefore, according to the FDA, sugar is a non-issue.”


They lie to our faces.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 09:04
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,762
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/167/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 116%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

So, according to the FDA a person's risk of diabetes will be reduced if they eat this 'food':

YoCrunch Low Fat Vanilla with OREO Yogurt

Calories: 120
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.5grm3%
Saturated Fat 1grm5%
Trans Fat 0grm0%
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 75mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 21grm8%
Dietary Fiber 0grm0%
Total Sugars 15grm0%
Added Sugars 11grm22%
Protein 3grm6%
Calcium 140mg10%
Iron 0.4mg2%
Potassium 160mg4%
* Percentage of Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
Ingredients:
Lowfat Yogurt: Cultured Pasteurized Grade A Lowfat Milk, Sugar, Water, Modified Corn Starch, Contains Less Than 1% Of Natural Flavors, Potassium Sorbate (To Maintain Freshness), Malic Acid, Sodium Citrate, Vitamin D3. Oreos Cookie Pieces: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Palm And/Or Canola Oil, Cocoa (Processed With Alkali), High Fructose Corn Syrup, Leavening (Baking Soda And/Or Calcium Phosphate), Salt, Soy Lecithin, Chocolate, Artificial Flavor.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 09:05
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 26,719
 
Plan: Muscle Centric
Stats: 238/153/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 109%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
So, according to the FDA a person's risk of diabetes will be reduced if they eat this 'food':

YoCrunch Low Fat Vanilla with OREO Yogurt

Calories: 120
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.5grm3%
Saturated Fat 1grm5%
Trans Fat 0grm0%
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 75mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 21grm8%
Dietary Fiber 0grm0%
Total Sugars 15grm0%
Added Sugars 11grm22%
Protein 3grm6%
Calcium 140mg10%
Iron 0.4mg2%
Potassium 160mg4%
* Percentage of Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
Ingredients:
Lowfat Yogurt: Cultured Pasteurized Grade A Lowfat Milk, Sugar, Water, Modified Corn Starch, Contains Less Than 1% Of Natural Flavors, Potassium Sorbate (To Maintain Freshness), Malic Acid, Sodium Citrate, Vitamin D3. Oreos Cookie Pieces: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Palm And/Or Canola Oil, Cocoa (Processed With Alkali), High Fructose Corn Syrup, Leavening (Baking Soda And/Or Calcium Phosphate), Salt, Soy Lecithin, Chocolate, Artificial Flavor.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 09:36
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,886
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

I'm still googling around for more information, but apparently the qualified health claims came into being to provide at least some kind of control over what supplement and food manufacturers could claim as benefits of their products.

This is from the FDA website:

Quote:
Qualified health claims (QHCs) are supported by scientific evidence, but do not meet the more rigorous “significant scientific agreement” standard required for an authorized health claim. To ensure that these claims are not misleading, they must be accompanied by a disclaimer or other qualifying language to accurately communicate to consumers the level of scientific evidence supporting the claim.

Food manufacturers can petition the agency to consider exercising enforcement discretion for the use of a qualified health claim. The FDA does not “approve” qualified health claim petitions. For a QHC petition with credible scientific evidence, the FDA issues a Letter of Enforcement Discretion including specific claim language that reflects the level of supporting scientific evidence and details of all enforcement discretion factors under which the FDA will not object to the use of the QHC. The process does not involve rulemaking.


To those who understand that a qualified health claim is not patent agreement by the FDA that there really is a health benefit to a certain food, it at least tones down some of the advertising from earlier decades.

Does anyone recall the old ads showing 90+ year olds hiking, horseback riding, splitting wood - all attributed to eating yogurt all their lives?

And that was just yogurt - Any food company would be able to find a few individuals who were well into their 80's or beyond and have eaten their particular food for their entire lives while staying healthy and active well into old age.

If anyone is interested in reading the (very lengthy) Qualified Health Claims letters to food manufacturers on all the foods currently allowed to display a QHC on their product:

https://www.fda.gov/food/food-label...ment-discretion

Yogurt is under the list related to Diabetes.

I didn't read all 51 pages, but I did notice bits in there about being able to pull the QHC at some point in the future if it turns out future data/statistics show sugared yogurts are not associated with reduced diabetes development (and they also pointed out that sugar consumption is associated with the development of diabetes, so it seems even they were skeptical about the claim, but put it through anyway)

________

While looking for that, I came across this:

Letter Regarding Dietary Supplement Health Claim for Fiber With Respect to Colorectal Cancer (Docket No. 91N-0098)

That was issued in 2000.

I checked the letters of approval to see if they'd changed their minds since then on fiber preventing cancer - nope, not on that list.

And yet, everywhere you turn, high fiber foods are still pushed as the #1 way to prevent colorectal cancer. (The letter does point out that people who eat a lot of fruits and vegetables get a lot of fiber in their diets and have lowered chances of colorectal cancer, but there's no concluding evidence that the fiber component is responsible, that it might very well be the nutrients in the fruits and veggies.)
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 09:43
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,886
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
So, according to the FDA a person's risk of diabetes will be reduced if they eat this 'food':

YoCrunch Low Fat Vanilla with OREO Yogurt

Calories: 120
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.5grm3%
Saturated Fat 1grm5%
Trans Fat 0grm0%
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 75mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 21grm8%
Dietary Fiber 0grm0%
Total Sugars 15grm0%
Added Sugars 11grm22%
Protein 3grm6%
Calcium 140mg10%
Iron 0.4mg2%
Potassium 160mg4%
* Percentage of Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
Ingredients:
Lowfat Yogurt: Cultured Pasteurized Grade A Lowfat Milk, Sugar, Water, Modified Corn Starch, Contains Less Than 1% Of Natural Flavors, Potassium Sorbate (To Maintain Freshness), Malic Acid, Sodium Citrate, Vitamin D3. Oreos Cookie Pieces: Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Sugar, Palm And/Or Canola Oil, Cocoa (Processed With Alkali), High Fructose Corn Syrup, Leavening (Baking Soda And/Or Calcium Phosphate), Salt, Soy Lecithin, Chocolate, Artificial Flavor.


I've seen worse.

I took a look at a Chobani Flip yogurt yesterday - 17 g of ADDED sugars! (And while the container holds even less than the "standard" 5 oz serving of yogurt, the yogurt section of the container is about 1/4 cup.

Healthy!
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 10:03
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,762
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/167/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 116%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I've seen worse.

I took a look at a Chobani Flip yogurt yesterday - 17 g of ADDED sugars! (And while the container holds even less than the "standard" 5 oz serving of yogurt, the yogurt section of the container is about 1/4 cup.

Healthy!

A lot of those yogurts are really liquid candies.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Tue, Mar-05-24, 14:30
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,886
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Yes they are.

They wouldn't sell nearly as much yogurt if it was not sugared-up.

And now the vast majority of them are not only sweetened within an inch of their lives, they're also fat-free.

I'm trying to comprehend how there was no difference in diabetes prevention between the ones who ate unsweetened yogurts and the one who hate sugary yogurts. The only thing I can imagine is that yogurt in general is considered to be a relatively healthy food - sugar or no sugar, fat or no fat.

People who care about their health are eating yogurt, where as people who don't care about their health will very likely simply eat candy or ice cream.

If they're eating yogurt for perceived health benefits, even if they're choosing the sugary ones, it's possible that they're making somewhat better food choices in general, even if they're not ideal food choices:

Someone who doesn't care one bit about healthy eating might choose a Big Mac, large fries, and full-sugar large drink, with an apple pie for dessert.


The more health conscious individual might have a salad, a deli chicken sandwich on whole grain, diet soda or water, and a yogurt for dessert.

Yeah, we can argue that the sandwich is providing a lot of carbs, but it's still only about 30 g carbs compared to the 46 carbs of a Big Mac, a salad will have very few carbs compared to the large fries (65g carbs). And of course we can talk about how the diet soda is bad for you because of the artificial sweeteners - but that diet soda won't have any carbs at all, compared to the 77 g of sugar in the large drink.

Even far less than ideal food and drink choices can make a huge difference in how much glucose floods the system after a meal, which could very well be why even those who eat full sugar yogurts are still managing to avoid diabetes.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 23:28.


Copyright © 2000-2024 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.