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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 10:48
Tom873 Tom873 is offline
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Default What do you guys do for snacks?

What do you guys for snacks? Before I started the diet I could just grab a piece of fruit, dark chocolate, rolled oats, yogurt, etc. I don't want to eat nothing but meats and vegetables. And when I want something to tide me over I don't want to have to cook. I've been eating small pieces of dark chocolate each day, hope it's okay, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts. Any other suggestions? Thanks.
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 11:11
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Posts: 5,160
 
Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom873
I don't want to eat nothing but meats and vegetables.

Have you thought about why that is? I felt that way at first, but after a couple weeks of getting used to it, I decided that meat and vegetables was exactly what I wanted to eat. I also ate coconut milk, fatty nuts and seasonal berries for a while, but eventually I gave them up too.

Before I started intermittent fasting, I would just eat leftovers for snacks, cold or reheated. But I've found that after adapting to it, and eating sufficient fat and protein, I don't need snacks at all.

Some people eat full-fat or double-fat Greek yogurt.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 11:21
msmum1977's Avatar
msmum1977 msmum1977 is offline
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Posts: 1,172
 
Plan: VLC/Carnivore
Stats: 369/301/299 Female 5'9"
BF:too much.
Progress: 97%
Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
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I find the small cans of flavoured tuna pretty convenient, along with pepperoni sticks, and cheese sticks (if you eat dairy). If you're able to afford it (vs. doing it yourself), buy a prepared veggie tray. At least then, you can just grab your veggies on the run. Or if you're on a tighter budget, cut the veggies yourself on the weekend for picking at all week.

If you're in a convenience store, try beef jerky or smoked almonds (but read the labels!).

Natural peanut, almond, or sunflower seed butter on celery is good, too! Or as capmikee suggested, the king of all snacks: leftovers...got some chicken wings from last nite or leftover roast? These are awesome on the run. Planning ahead or cooking extra can go a long way when needing some thing fast, as well.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 11:53
Tom873 Tom873 is offline
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I only eat organic/all natural foods and I have esophageal ulcers so it's hard for me find many things that I can eat. This diet makes it A LOT harder. I used to live on peanut butter but now that's out of the question. I believe I'm also allergic to sunflower seeds and almonds. As I said, all I snack on now are pumpkin seeds and walnuts. The other day while shopping I found all natural chicken sausages. http://colemannatural.com/component...roller,article/ However, I don't want to over do it with them due to cholesterol and high sodium in take. Also, it says that there is less than 2% of apple cider vinegar in the ingredients. Are these still okay to snack on? Some say apple cider vinegar is all right while others say it isn't. Would less than 2% be that big of a deal? Also, any other suggestions?
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 12:25
msmum1977's Avatar
msmum1977 msmum1977 is offline
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Posts: 1,172
 
Plan: VLC/Carnivore
Stats: 369/301/299 Female 5'9"
BF:too much.
Progress: 97%
Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
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it's odd that you would only be allergic to almonds and not walnuts. How about pecans? Or other nuts like macadamias? Peanuts I know are problematic.

I was in Mac's Milk (the canadian equivalent of 7-11...not too sure where you are) last week and noticed they carried some organic jerky...which really surprised me. I can't recall the brand, because I ate it and then thre out the wrapper! But I will go back and check...maybe something for you to look into in your area.

Can you eat seafood or fish? I know it's hard to find that organic, though.

I think with the cider vinegar, low-carb wise, I would use caution and read the label. As for your ulcers, well, I can't advise you on that...YMMV. You may need to test it out to see what your own results are.
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Dec-09-09, 13:28
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom873
I only eat organic/all natural foods and I have esophageal ulcers so it's hard for me find many things that I can eat.

I don't know about esophageal ulcers in particular, but from all the bad information I've heard about IBS and GERD, I wonder if you're currently restricting things that would actually help you heal. What are you avoiding now?

From what I've learned, the very best food for healing the GI tract is broth. Best to make it at home. Buy a couple whole chickens ("stewers" are best) or just save your bones in the freezer whenever you eat chicken (save the skin too if you don't eat it). Simmer it in a pot for about 12 hours, strain it and boil it down to reduce the volume. Then make yourself a soup or a sauce with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom873
This diet makes it A LOT harder. .... However, I don't want to over do it with them due to cholesterol and high sodium in take.

I definitely think you're putting some unnecessary restrictions on your food. My suggestion is not to worry about sodium. Eliminating sodium can't lower your blood pressure more than 5 points - and it might actually harm your health.

As for cholesterol: you're a low-carber now, brother, and you need to make friends with your fats. It's well known that dietary cholesterol only raises serum cholesterol temporarily - almost all the cholesterol in your body is made by your body. Plus, the risks associated with "high cholesterol" have been very badly misinterpreted. The majority of low-carb books (e.g. Atkins, Protein Power and GCBC) will clue you in on the details of why you should NOT be avoiding cholesterol or saturated fat.

Quote:
Also, it says that there is less than 2% of apple cider vinegar in the ingredients. Are these still okay to snack on? Some say apple cider vinegar is all right while others say it isn't. Would less than 2% be that big of a deal? Also, any other suggestions?

Some people swear by ACV but it doesn't work for me. There may be exceptions to this rule, but in general I find that if a food bothers me, there is no safe dose for it and I must avoid it completely. But if you want to try it, go for it. You can always eliminate it later after the other changes in your diet have settled down.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Dec-10-09, 06:04
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Annajen Annajen is offline
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Plan: candida diet
Stats: 116/113/110 Female 5'1"
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HI everyone

Rice cakes taste nice with a little yogurt (there is a biopot coconut yogurt I like although it has a little sugar added, but I mix it with natural yogurt to reduce the sugar content and mix it with a little coconut oil).

Also, for times when you might feel hungry, if you take some rutabaga (swede = UK) and slice it like French fries, coat it in olive oil and sprinkle on a few herbs, roast it and then you can eat them like French fries for a snack in between meals if you are really hungry.

Also, Tahini nut dip is nice sometimes with veg, and there are also recipes for make-your-own dips, like tahini, eggplant (aubergine = UK), olive oil and cayenne pepper and garlic (a lot of which fight candida). You put them in a blender (cook the eggplant first though in oil to soften it) and then you can dip carrot sticks, peppers etc in it.

If you're making any homemade roasted and/or spiced nuts or seeds, that works for me too, but I've heard to stay away from walnuts, only because they have a high mould content which can be hard on candida sufferers.

Popcorn is also permitted sometimes on a candida diet, but you can't eat it constantly or ultimately it might feed the yeast too. As an occasional treat it's ok. In winter if I'm cold, I also make myself some warm rice milk with cinnamon stick, cloves and nutmeg.

Ginger tea is also good, although watch it if you have ulcers.

For a light snack soup-drink, I like some seaweed (I use the nori sushi sheets) torn up, then pour on boiling water, then add the juice of one lemon freshly squeezed, and then a pinch of seasalt (mine is rosemary seasalt). That should help your liver and thyroid a bit (both of which suffer a LOT in candida cases often) and it's a nice taste in the middle of the day when you're feeling a little low.

Like a lot of people here, I've also learned to snack on things that most people would not think of as "snack foods". Things like butternut squash with beetroot and natural yogurt and spices on top if you're craving something sweet. Also, I made a nice Moroccan dish last night with eggplant (aubergine), butternut squash (you can use pumpkin too), peppers, chopped tomatoes, cinnamon, cumin, kidney beans and chickpeas with spices and then snacked on that in the evening in place of my usual bedtime snack.

I agree with capmikee about the broth. Most of the recipes I'm using suggest buying tons of veg of your choice and basically adding some stock (I use Knorr's chicken mostly because it is completely free of yeast, and has only vegetables, no mushrooms, and spices and is pure liquid, not stock cubes). I also add a little butter and/or coconut oil to the soup to flavour it a bit, plus spices.

The only thing I would say is that I wouldn't avoid saturated fat but I also wouldn't overdo it either. This might just be in my case, since we have a history of heart disease in my family, so I'm more of a moderation person in this, although I know that a lot of people say they are managing fine on lots of saturated fats with no problems. If you WERE going to go that way, I would add a LOT of garlic into your diet to try to balance that the French way.

I know you don't want to eat only meats and veg, and that's understandable. I think it's worth making a distinction between the candida diet and the other low-carb diets in the other fora here. For example, on the candida diet, whole grains and brown rice are permitted (brown rice is apparently one of the best things at absorbing gut toxins and so some whole detox diets are based around wholegrain brown rice). Gentle grains (e.g. quinoa and millet etc) are generally allowed, but one of the problems is that you have to watch your blood ph levels with candida. Alkalyzing foods such as veg are very good for killing candida, but grains tend to go acidic in the blood slightly so you wouldn't want to combine them with meat, for example, but with veg instead. Similarly, meat and veg is ok, but where people run into a little trouble tends to be grains and meat together which can be a little acidic on the system.

(This is a paraphrase, BTW, I'm not clever enough to think of all this on my own---it's my book again. )

Hence, the problem with candida is not whether to eat wholegrains at all, but what to combine them with so as not to make your blood ph levels acidic, which might promote candida growth.

Of course, you HAVE to bump up the veg, because veg and certain fruits like lemons, although they may seem acidic actually turn alkaline in the blood after digestion, so they are actually GOOD for killing candida and re-alkalizing your body. You also should watch what foods you combine with what, to improve your body ph, and try to cut down on meat slightly if you are a very heavy meat eater, only because it (and dairy) tend to make your body ph more acidic.

Just my two cents and some paraphrasing, but hope the snack ideas might help a bit.

For more information on candida and blood ph, you can try this link I found which has links at the bottom discussing it in more detail.

http://www.crohns.net/Miva/education/candidiasis.shtml

Last edited by Annajen : Fri, Dec-11-09 at 03:57.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Dec-10-09, 12:12
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Posts: 5,160
 
Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annajen
The only thing I would say is that I wouldn't avoid saturated fat but I also wouldn't overdo it either. This might just be in my case, since we have a history of heart disease in my family, so I'm more of a moderation person in this, although I know that a lot of people say they are managing fine on lots of saturated fats with no problems. If you WERE going to go that way, I would add a LOT of garlic into your diet to try to balance that the French way.

Funny you should say that - I have a history of heart disease in my family too and that's why I do not restrict saturated fat.

Dr. Eades on 7 Reasons to Eat More Saturated Fat

I don't eat garlic at all because it gives me horrible breath and stomach cramps. After over a year of trying, I can't believe that it's die-off symptoms anymore. However, I do eat heart and liver. The CoQ10 and Vitamins A, D and K2 in them will help you make the most of the saturated fat in your diet.

I think it's much more important to limit your omega-6 intake than your saturated fat intake - omega-6 is inflammatory, which can have a negative impact on both candida and heart health. The best way to do that is to avoid vegetable oils. The second best way is to eat grass-fed or pastured meat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annajen
For example, on the candida diet, whole grains and brown rice are permitted (brown rice is apparently one of the best things at absorbing gut toxins and so some whole detox diets are based around wholegrain brown rice). Gentle grains (e.g. quinoa and millet etc) are generally allowed, but one of the problems is that you have to watch your blood ph levels with candida.


There's more than one candida diet, and some of them do not allow whole grains. We were just discussing the fiber from grains in the butyric acid thread and many folks over there agree that it can be much harder on the gut than fiber from vegetables.

Millet in particular is one of the least gentle grains for me. Every time I've had millet it's been instant and intense pain. After trying several grain alternatives, I decided I was better off without any grains.

I have to add one more comment: Rice cakes are not a food. Puffed rice is created through a high-temperature industrial process that destroys any possibility of nutrition. Marketing them as a health food was one of the biggest swindles of the 20th century.
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  #9   ^
Old Thu, Dec-10-09, 13:53
Annajen's Avatar
Annajen Annajen is offline
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Plan: candida diet
Stats: 116/113/110 Female 5'1"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capmikee
Funny you should say that - I have a history of heart disease in my family too and that's why I do not restrict saturated fat.

I don't eat garlic at all because it gives me horrible breath and stomach cramps. After over a year of trying, I can't believe that it's die-off symptoms anymore. However, I do eat heart and liver.


HI capmikee!

I'll check out the link---thanks! I have also found that liver in particular (cow liver when I can get it, lamb's liver when I can't get it) REALLY helps me too. I always feel much better after eating liver. I try to keep it in balance, though, because it is also high in cholesterol. I read that the real problem is not cholesterol in healthy people but that higher cholesterol is an effect of candida problems. (Can't say if it's true or not, but I did read it somewhere, although everything in print isn't necessarily true either . . . ). Because of the current debate about the issue, I tend to go with the "everything in moderation" approach, but that's just me. In my own case, I do eat saturated fat, but in moderation and balanced with other types of fats too (Omegas 3,6 and 9). Still, everyone is different so if something is working for you, go for it!

I know what you mean about garlic since it isn't for everyone. I don't have the stomach bloating symptoms, so it is ok for me and I feel great when I eat it.

RE: omega 6 intake . . . I take it in a pre-balanced oil or else in a capsule form, also pre-balanced with Omega 3 and 9 in a ratio. I take on board your point about not overdoing omega 6 on its own though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capmikee
There's more than one candida diet, and some of them do not allow whole grains. We were just discussing the fiber from grains in the butyric acid thread and many folks over there agree that it can be much harder on the gut than fiber from vegetables.

Millet in particular is one of the least gentle grains for me. Every time I've had millet it's been instant and intense pain. After trying several grain alternatives, I decided I was better off without any grains.

I have to add one more comment: Rice cakes are not a food. Puffed rice is created through a high-temperature industrial process that destroys any possibility of nutrition. Marketing them as a health food was one of the biggest swindles of the 20th century.


I agree with most of your comments, insofar as they apply to you and others who are also on candida diets. I think that, above all, this illustrates exactly why people should seek medical and nutritional guidance before beginning any new diet since really, what is needed to treat candida or any illness, is an individual approach.

As for me, I'm fine on millet and other wholegrains but then my food intolerances were more in the wheat, gluten, and shellfish areas. I also have colitis but not really stomach issues with bloating, and from my symptoms at least, the big candida problems I had were in the colon rather than at the top of the digestive system.

I also agree that rice cakes aren't really a food, but I admit to keeping them around for emergencies (e.g. travelling, occasional snacking if I'm in a hurry etc) mainly because they don't seem to do me much harm and they are better than the alternative of potato chips etc. if I need something to spread yogurt or tahini on in a hurry.

As you say, my doctor also pointed out that there is no one "proper" candida diet, except that there is general agreement that sugary and starchy foods exacerbate the condition and should be avoided. I think the best thing is for anyone with candida to get treated by a doctor who can assess their condition completely, including issues like blood pressure, weight, family health history, allergies etc and take it from there, since I think monitoring by a trained professional for these things (cholesterol, vitamin and mineral deficiencies etc) is pretty important for anyone who has enough symptoms to suspect candida in the first place.

I also agree with what you said earlier about not excluding foods unnecessarily. One guide I read said to avoid several veggies my doctor said were fine on a candida diet, so even amongst doctors there is not necessarily a consensus about these things.

Makes for a good discussion though!

Last edited by Annajen : Fri, Dec-11-09 at 03:53.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Dec-11-09, 16:32
Tom873 Tom873 is offline
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Are any of you familiar with Lindt chocolate? They make an 85% dark chocolate and it has the lowest amount of carbs and sugar I've ever seen in a chocolate. 4 squares only have 8g of carbs and 5g of sugars. It's also really good if you add extra virgin coconut oil to it. It almost tastes like a Mounds. Do you think it would it be okay to have one square a day?
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Dec-11-09, 17:06
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Low sugar chocolate is very popular amongst low carbers. The only thing I think is that chocolate can be kind of upsetting to the digestion for some people, with your ulcers I'm not sure. The coconut oil though is a great idea.
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Dec-12-09, 04:35
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Annajen Annajen is offline
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Plan: candida diet
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The only issue I have heard of with chocolate and why to avoid it on a candida diet is that it is actually a fermented food, like coffee, black tea, pickles, and most cheeses. Because candida sufferers tend to be sensitive to fermented foods in particular, the advice is often to avoid chocolate.

In my own case, I tested positive on a food intolerance test on chocolate and so of course have to avoid it until I'm better, at which point I will be able to reintroduce it in moderate amounts, at least according to my doctor. The book I'm reading also says to eliminate it on a candida diet, so I would be especially careful with the Lindt chocolates since the issue isn't only sugar but also chocolate itself. The Lindt bars have very high pure cocoa content (up to 85% in some of them) and so might not be ideal as a snack on a candida diet.

On an ordinary low carb diet, however, low sugar chocolate may be less of a problem since the dieter may not have the candida issues that go with fermented food sensitivities.

Again, though, this is just what I've been told by my doctor, and have heard/read, so every individual case may be different.
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  #13   ^
Old Sat, Dec-12-09, 06:36
Shyvas's Avatar
Shyvas Shyvas is offline
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Plan: Vegetarian LC
Stats: 148/137/132 Female 5.4
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I always keep snacks simple.

A celery stick filled with cream blue cheese.
A handful of almonds.
Soya yogurt (homemade) with cinammon and stevia.
Soya milk smoothie with peanut or almond butter.
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  #14   ^
Old Sat, Dec-12-09, 13:45
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Posts: 5,160
 
Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annajen
The only issue I have heard of with chocolate and why to avoid it on a candida diet is that it is actually a fermented food, like coffee, black tea, pickles, and most cheeses.

I just found out yesterday that black tea is not truly fermented:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea
Quote:
A tea's type is determined by the processing which it undergoes. Leaves of Camellia sinensis soon begin to wilt and oxidize if not dried quickly after picking. The leaves turn progressively darker as their chlorophyll breaks down and tannins are released. This process, enzymatic oxidation, is called fermentation in the tea industry, although it is not a true fermentation: it is not caused by micro-organisms, and is not an anaerobic process. The next step in processing is to stop the oxidation process at a predetermined stage by heating, which deactivates the enzymes responsible. With black tea this is done simultaneously with drying.

It goes on to say, however, that "post-fermented tea" is green tea that has been allowed to microbially ferment.

Hot-pack pickles (the kind you find in the store) are also not fermented although they are preserved in vinegar, which is a fermented product. Lacto-fermented "sour" pickles are made without vinegar, and they may even be beneficial to candida sufferers because they contain probiotics.
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  #15   ^
Old Sun, Dec-13-09, 06:59
Annajen's Avatar
Annajen Annajen is offline
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Plan: candida diet
Stats: 116/113/110 Female 5'1"
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Hi guys!

Capmikee. . . does that statement about green tea mean it is or isn't good on a candida diet? I mean, as I understand it, that suggests it's fermented and should be avoided---is that right?

I would like to include tea if I could, but I'm trying to be careful because I'm still pretty fragile as far as the candida goes, so are you saying that green is worse than black for proper "fermentation", as I understood it?

Sorry if I'm being thick here, but I just want to make sure I get this right before I head back on to tea.

As you say, some lacto-fermented "sour" things are reported to be beneficial in candida. One thing is sour-dough (no added yeast) bread. I've tried a version of that by Biona made with amaranth and quinoa and found it to actually help my digestion, so my doctor said I can stay on it. I've read other reports from candida patients who said that sourdough bread helped them too, although again, everyone is different so this should be taken with caution probably.
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