Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61   ^
Old Sat, Aug-29-20, 04:01
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,084
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
From what I read a year or two ago, the push to eat more bread in the US actually started in the 1920's. Those were years of plenty - and they had so much excessive wheat production that they simply couldn't store all the grain that was being produced. So the US government ran ads telling people to eat more bread.


It was a wild decade. It's my understanding this was also when the discoveries of WWI started being addressed. Like a third of the conscripts were unable to handle being a soldier because they were so under-nourished.

This started things like school lunch programs and providing milk. Which had a miraculous effect on starving children.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #62   ^
Old Tue, Sep-01-20, 00:55
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,272
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

NHS hails ‘life-changing’ diet programme to fight diabetes

Eating soup and shakes could reverse type 2 diabetes in half of cases


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...betes-p8ll5p8j9

Quote:
A diet of soups and shakes will be provided by the NHS for type 2 diabetes patients from today after studies showed that it reversed the condition in nearly half of cases.

The food will be prescribed to 5,000 patients for three months and include “total diet replacement products”, such as specially formulated low-calorie shakes and soups. The regime restricts them to 800 calories a day.

The national scheme, described by the NHS as “life-changing”, comes after trials showed that dramatic weight loss had led to diabetes going into remission.

A study in the UK in 2017 found that 46 per cent of type 2 patients who were placed on an ultra low-calorie diet needed no medication a year later. Some 70 per cent of those patients were still in remission after two years.

In type 2 diabetes not enough insulin is made in the pancreas or it does not work properly, leading to dangerously high blood sugar levels. Five million people in Britain have the condition, which can greatly affect everyday life and lead to amputations and blindness.

Studies increasingly show that significant weight loss reduces fat in the pancreas, allowing it to recover the ability to produce insulin.

The specially formulated food will be given to selected patients in England who have had the condition for at least six years. Alongside the food plan, they will be encouraged to take more exercise and given advice and coaching about reintroducing healthy meals.

If successful, the treatment could reduce the £10 billion a year spent by the NHS on type 2 cases. Almost 5 per cent of prescriptions are written to treat diabetes. Patients are also at twice the risk of dying from the coronavirus and a third of people who died in hospital with the virus had diabetes.

Tam Fry, chairman of the National Obesity Forum, said: “If your GP suggests this treatment for you, go for it. Though reducing your calorie intake to some 800 a day may not be easy at first, persist with the diet since it has been proven in several trials to work.”

In July the NHS announced that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes could self-refer to specialist services in an effort to curb one of the biggest risk factors in Covid-19 deaths.

A study published last week by the University of North Carolina found that obese people are 113 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with coronavirus symptoms and 74 per cent more likely to need intensive care treatment.

The diet programme will be available initially to patients in ten areas of England and will be accessible to people who have had type 2 diabetes diagnosed in the past six years.

Professor Jonathan Valabhji, NHS national clinical director for diabetes and obesity, said: “There has never been a more important time to lose weight and put type 2 diabetes into remission, so it’s good news for thousands of people across the country that practical, supportive measures like this are increasingly available on the NHS.”

Bridget Turner, director of policy campaigns and improvement at Diabetes UK, said the programme was “an important first step” for patients to access a remission programme within the NHS.

“We know that some people with type 2 diabetes want and need support from healthcare professionals to lose weight effectively, and now as these programmes are piloted across the NHS they will,” she said. “People with type 2 diabetes who have put their diabetes into remission frequently tell us how it has changed their lives.

“We are so pleased to see that others will now have the same opportunity.”

In 2017 results from a trial in 298 type 2 diabetics showed that 46 per cent of those on an ultra-low-calorie food replacement diet of 800 calories a day for three to five months were in remission with no need for medication a year later. Some 70 per cent of those patients were still in remission two years later and had maintained an average weight loss of 10.4kg (one and half stone).

Analysis

The idea of being able to effectively diet your way into remission from type 2 diabetes is a relatively new field of study and hugely exciting for the five million people in Britain who have the disease.

It was only in 2017 that a study in the UK found that putting a person with type 2 diabetes on an intensive weight loss programme could reverse the disease with no need for medication.

Almost half of the participants in the weight-loss trial that used low-calorie shakes and soups were in remission after 12 months. After two years, 70 per cent of those people were still in remission. In comparison, only 4 per cent of those in the trial who were just given standard GP care for diabetes went into remission.

The relatively straightforward method also produces the same results as bariatric surgery, such as gastric bands or bypasses, but is far less risky and expensive for the NHS. Treating type 2 diabetes and its complications costs the NHS an average of £10 billion a year.

This rollout of a diet plan to 5,000 patients also comes at a crucial time as winter nears and the risk of getting coronavirus may begin to creep up again. NHS research has shown that the risk of dying from Covid-19 is doubled for patients with diabetes.

The dietary advice given out in the programme is not much different from that given by the NHS more generally. What is different is the counselling that goes with it. This is important, as the ability to keep the weight loss down long-term will be the greater challenge for the NHS, and patients must not be abandoned beyond the initial phase of dieting.


Last edited by Demi : Tue, Sep-01-20 at 01:15.
Reply With Quote
  #63   ^
Old Tue, Sep-01-20, 06:49
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,560
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
In type 2 diabetes not enough insulin is made in the pancreas or it does not work properly, leading to dangerously high blood sugar levels. Five million people in Britain have the condition, which can greatly affect everyday life and lead to amputations and blindness.

Studies increasingly show that significant weight loss reduces fat in the pancreas, allowing it to recover the ability to produce insulin.

I suspect T2 diabetics' insulin works just fine (that is, is not biologically defective in its makeup) and the problem is in the toxic overload of stored energy, as evidenced by the refered-to fat loss from the pancreas improving its health and insulin productivity. Dr. Jason Fung has addressed this matter of toxic energy overload as well as Dr. Naiman and Marty Kendall as well. Here's a handy short video by Dr. Ken Berry (whom many in the low carb community are familiar with) on a simple nutrient-rich weight loss diet I'm finding really useful that doesn't require severe calorie reduction or purchase of highly processed food-like products of dubious nutritional value: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LN...6t7v1N&index=32
Reply With Quote
  #64   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 00:09
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,272
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Why 80s slimming regimes are the future of dieting

As low-calorie shakes and soups become available on the NHS to reverse diabetes, experts explain the benefits - and the elephant in the room


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...future-dieting/

Quote:
Long before there was the Atkins, the Dukan or the Paleo, there was one diet favoured by anyone looking to lose weight fast: the liquid diet.

The 20th century had its fill of them: the cabbage soup diet (which promised a hearty detox and fewer than 100 calories per bowl), the apple cider vinegar diet (when sipped before every meal, it nixed your appetite and stripped your tooth enamel)...even the milk diet, whereby followers down four pints of semi-skimmed a day.

But then in 1988, chat show host Oprah Winfrey announced she had lost 67 pounds by drinking Optifast, a ‘meal replacement’ shake, and celebrated by dragging a wagon full of that much fat across her studio set.

Now, ultra-low calorie soups and shakes have been pulled out of the diet archives and are being touted as an effective way to rapidly lose weight and even reverse diabetes, which studies show can increase the severity of a bout of coronavirus.

From this week, soups and shakes will be available free on the NHS, after research showing that half of type 2 diabetics placed on an 12-week, 800-calorie diet were in remission a year later.

This is somewhat of a U-turn from the typical NHS diet plan for weight loss, which recommends 1,400 calories a day for women and 1,900 for men – leading to a loss of one to two pounds a week.

The rapid weight loss from liquid diets can have a powerful psychological effect on slimmers, says Kim Pearson, a London-based nutritionist. “[Rapid weight loss] is 100 per cent good for motivation”, she says. Her Harley Street practice recommends Proteifine meal replacement products, which deliver between 800 and 1,000 calories a day, and can lead to weight loss of around a stone a month.

Among her patients is Martina Coogan, 49, who shed eight and a half stone using Proteifine products over two years. She turned to Pearson for support after her cousin, just six weeks her senior, died from a heart attack. “Kim saved my life - literally,” she says.

Pearson believes that a few months away from a conventional diet can be effective because it helps to “reset” behaviour patterns and stop clients constantly thinking about eating. “It’s kind of like food rehab,” she says.

Debbie Kersey, 58, agrees. “It stops you thinking about mealtimes,” says Kersey, who lost two and a half stone using Exante shakes, recommended by her doctor as a treatment for her type 2 diabetes.

Kersey has been dieting since she was 14, but says that only using the low-calorie shakes could she prevent cravings for unhealthy food. She is not the only one – bizarrely, very-low calorie liquid diets can leave followers feeling less hungry than they would if they steadily cut down on portion sizes.

There is not yet solid evidence as to why that might be the case, but Professor Francesco Rubino, a consultant bariatric surgeon at London Bridge Hospital, has a theory: very-low calorie diets - as few as 800 kcals per day - whether in soups, shakes or whole food, have a similar effect on the body as a gastric bypass.

He explains that bariatric surgery is not just effective by reducing the size of the stomach, it also disrupts the body’s attempts to make you regain the weight by increasing hunger and decreasing fullness. This happens because the part of your gut responsible for creating these signals is bypassed surgically: it is no longer stimulated, and so stops telling your brain that you are hungry.

With very-low calorie diets, Rubino believes the same thing is happening: the gut is not being constantly stimulated by food passing through, and in its resting state does not create feelings of hunger.

“It can happen either with surgery, or a diet that is so low in food intake that it brings that level of gut exposure to stimulus as close as possible to zero,” he says.

However, he advises a note of caution, given there are not yet any studies into the potential long-term effects of these diets.

Dr Michael Mosley, the BBC broadcaster and creator of the 5:2 Diet, believes there might be another mechanism at work which explains how liquid diets reduce hunger: ketosis, or when the body uses fat, not sugar, for fuel. He thinks we have evolved to feel less hungry when this is happening: in times of food shortage, it would have been “fatal” for ancient humans to be “too distracted by hunger”, he says.

Dr Mosley himself sells an 800 calorie-a-day diet plan, where followers have up to two shakes a day and one light meal. He says that eating this way for eight to 10 weeks can be markedly effective for controlling diabetes – and much more so than conventional steady dieting.

This is because rapid dieting encourages the body to first use stores of fat in the liver and pancreas – crucial for type 2 diabetes patients where excess fat around the pancreas prevents it from working properly and producing insulin.

“Most of these patients have 30 to 35 per cent liver fat - they’re like foie gras geese,” he says. “But in a few weeks [of rapid dieting], it drains out and is reduced to 3 per cent.”

He points to a 2018 study, which compared the effects of a meal replacement programme of around 800 calories a day to those using traditional NHS weight loss programmes. Those who followed the low calorie diet were 10.7kg lighter a year later, three times more than in the other group. They also managed much better reductions in their risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

However, these diets need to be followed with caution. They are most suitable for those who have a lot to lose already, and would be a no-go for anyone with a history of eating disorders.

Different brands of soups and shakes on the market also differ widely in the nutrition they provide. One with high levels of carbohydrates and low fat and protein might be a disaster for your metabolism, says Pearson.

“With a low-calorie, low-protein diet, you eat salad and fruit and don’t have enough protein, so the body will lose muscle,” she says. Since muscle uses more energy at rest than other tissues in the body, this could mean that your metabolism will slow down and you will “put weight back on so fast”.

Instead, look for something with adequate protein and fats, as well as vitamins and minerals.

There may also be some short-term side effects which could be frustrating, like headaches and constipation. Dr Mosley recommends that drinking plenty of water may help with these effects.

There is also the great big elephant in the room: what happens when the 12-week programme is over, and you have to go back to eating normal, solid food?

This stage has tripped up Kersey time and again. Over lockdown, she has put back on a stone from her initial two and a half stone weight loss. “It’s the maintaining that’s the hard bit,” she says. She will be cutting out food and going back on the shake-only diet this week.

The NHS’s new plan is designed to mitigate some of this by putting the 12-week soups and shakes diet into a year-long programme, where counsellors help patients to gradually re-introduce food in a safe way.

It seems clear that soups and shakes can be extremely effective in the short-term for rapid weight loss and treating diabetes. But what effects this might have on their body in the years to come are still unclear, says Rubino. “We simply don’t know what will happen over the long term.”

Reply With Quote
  #65   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 00:59
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,272
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Boris Johnson’s cycling ‘revolution’ to tackle obesity is nothing more than a ‘gross deception’

Dr Aseem Malhotra, one of the UK’s leading anti-obesity campaigners, says the Government is still appeasing the food industry and focusing on wrong things


https://inews.co.uk/news/health/ase...-obesity-614501

Quote:
Boris Johnson’s recent anti-obesity “crackdown”, spearheaded by the Government’s £2bn “cycling and walking revolution”, should have gone down well with health experts.

The “Better Health” campaign, offering advice to 35 million people on how to lose weight and keep it off, was launched with the message that being overweight or obese puts people at greater risk of serious illness or death from Covid-19. Yet one expert was left deeply unimpressed.

“It’s a gross deception,” fumes Aseem Malhotra, an NHS-trained cardiologist and one of the UK’s leading anti-obesity campaigners.
Quote:
Taking on the ultra-processed food industry

A public health campaign on “ultra-processed food”, telling people to stop eating food that comes out of a packet and has five or more ingredients, would help save lives even if the Government ran it for just a few weeks, says Dr Aseem Malhotra.“

If you followed that advice for a month, you’d lose more than five pounds and be much healthier because of it,” he says.“More than half our calorie intake is from ultra-processed food. But we haven’t [run this campaign] and it’s yet another example of appeasing the food industry. It’s a national scandal and we shouldn’t allow it to continue.

“We need to start saying that type 2 diabetes is ‘ultra-processed food disease’, heart disease is ‘ultra-processed food disease’, obesity is ‘ultra-processed food disease’, high blood pressure is ‘ultra-processed food disease’.

“Let’s just keep repeating that mantra and educate people what ultra-processed food is. It’s the new tobacco and we need to start treating it that way.”
Reply With Quote
  #66   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 05:48
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,613
 
Plan: P:E/DDF/LC-DrWestman
Stats: 225/170/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

And what is any more ultra-processed than packaged Soups and Shakes!! Follow the money...what company manufactures these products? The NHS plan had some partners like WW, sure one of those partners will so helpfully suggest their products.

Yeah, Dr. Malhotra!

And agree with Zei! Nutrient dense real foods are key to "reversing insulin resistance". Dr Berry should add some veggies

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Sep-02-20 at 05:54.
Reply With Quote
  #67   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 05:59
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 14,934
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 45%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

X2 !!!

Unfortunately,most people want a solution as easy as a pill.

Over the years, my foods have moved to whole food not processed. Not about loosing weight, but a focus on better health.

Hate Glucerna ads and Pedia Sure ads. Not food imho.
Reply With Quote
  #68   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 07:18
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,560
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
And what is any more ultra-processed than packaged Soups and Shakes!! Follow the money...what company manufactures these products? The NHS plan had some partners like WW, sure one of those partners will so helpfully suggest their products.

Yeah, Dr. Malhotra!

And agree with Zei! Nutrient dense real foods are key to "reversing insulin resistance". Dr Berry should add some veggies

Actually if you follow his diet history he finally took out the veggies (adopted a fully animal foods diet) and found he did a lot better than before with the plants. I'm finding that true right now for my own body as well. Some people do well with plants and some just don't.
Reply With Quote
  #69   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 08:55
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,084
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
“It can happen either with surgery, or a diet that is so low in food intake that it brings that level of gut exposure to stimulus as close as possible to zero,” he says.

However, he advises a note of caution, given there are not yet any studies into the potential long-term effects of these diets.


Hmmm... I don't remember any cautions about the potential long-term effects of removing healthy parts of people's digestive system.
Reply With Quote
  #70   ^
Old Wed, Sep-02-20, 09:37
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 3,527
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Hmmm... I don't remember any cautions about the potential long-term effects of removing healthy parts of people's digestive system.

Exactly
Reply With Quote
  #71   ^
Old Thu, Sep-03-20, 07:28
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is online now
Posts: 8,564
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Lord, save me from liquid diets!
Reply With Quote
  #72   ^
Old Thu, Sep-03-20, 10:22
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,499
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

The only shake mentioned above was the Exante shake, so I looked up the ingredients:

Quote:
Skimmed Milk Powder (43%), Whey Protein Concentrate (Milk) [Contains Emulsifiers; Sunflower Lecithin, Soya Lecithin], Soya Protein Isolate, Soyabean Oil Creamer (Refined Soya Bean Oil, Maltodextrin, Milk Proteins, Emulsifier (Soya Lecithin), Antioxidants (Alpha- Tocopherol, Fatty Acid Esters of Ascorbic Acid (Soya))), Coconut Oil Creamer (Coconut Oil, Whey Powder (Milk), Milk Proteins, Stabiliser (Triphosphates), Antioxidant (Tricalcium Phosphate)), Inulin, Flavourings, Tripotassium Citrate, Thickeners (Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum), Salt, Maltodextrin, Colour (Beetroot Red), Vitamin & Mineral Mix (Vitamin C, Zinc Gluconate, Ferric Diphosphate, Vitamin E, Niacin, Copper Gluconate, Vitamin A, Sodium Fluoride, Manganese Sulphate Monohydrate, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin B12, Vitamin B6, Vitamin K1, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Sodium Molybdate), Di Potassium Phosphate, Calcium Chloride, Magnesium Oxide, Sweetener (Sucralose).


Lots of soy in there. The nutrition stats show 16 g carbs, 3.8g fiber, and 12g sugars, with 18g protein, and 6.6 g fat. (The amount of sugars doesn't make it sweet enough though - they add sucralose too)

Somehow, after drinking these sweet things every day for a few months, they're supposed to switch back to a healthier real food diet, without giving in to sweet cravings. I'm amazed that anyone has been able to do that, unless they were just absolutely sick to death of sweet stuff when they finally finished the weight loss program.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:58.


Copyright © 2000-2020 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.