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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Nov-28-19, 02:46
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Keto/IF
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Default Farmers accuse BBC of bias over prime-time anti-meat programme

Farmers accuse BBC of bias over prime-time anti-meat programme

https://www.fwi.co.uk/news/environm...-meat-programme

Quote:
Farmers have accused the BBC of biased reporting following its hour-long documentary Meat: A Threat to Our Planet?, which examined the environmental effects of livestock production around the world.

The programme, aired at 9pm on BBC1 on Monday (25 November), included footage and interviews from US cattle feedlots and intensive pig units – focusing on the scale of production, the impact on the atmosphere and the pollution of watercourses.



Meat: A Threat to our Planet?
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episo...t-to-our-planet


Quote:
The BBC's alarmist attack on British farmers was unjustified and counterproductive

There would have been a time when food production and farming would have featured relatively prominently in an election campaign since we all have to eat. Now, farmers are likely to be the whipping boys for politicians anxious to burnish their environmental credentials.

This is particularly so for livestock farmers who have a hard enough time of it without having to justify their existence against the power and reach of a BBC documentary effectively urging people not to buy their products any more. On Monday, the programme Meat: A Threat to our Planet, purported to show the damage inflicted on the global environment by livestock practices.

The film showed how the Amazonian rainforest had been felled in places for grazing and said British consumers were contributing to this state of affairs by eating Brazilian beef. But imports from Brazil amount to just one per cent of the total, with more than 90 per cent from the EU, mainly Ireland.

The fact is that British farmers, as Minette Batters argues for the Telegraph, have a very good, sustainable story to tell that risks being completely undermined by the BBC. In our increasingly urbanised society, many viewers will imagine that the intensive farming methods depicted in the documentary are used here when they aren’t. Many British farmers are producing local food in an environmentally friendly way and should be encouraged – not vilified.

The presenter Liz Bonnin and the BBC said the aim was to help consumers make “an informed choice” but this sort of alarmism will help no one if it puts sustainable producers out of business. The political parties should do more in this campaign to speak up for our farmers.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion...nterproductive/


Farmers start beef with BBC as meat documentary's claims come under fire
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...ary-nfu-accuse/

Last edited by Demi : Thu, Nov-28-19 at 02:52.
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Nov-28-19, 16:43
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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It is unfortunate that this opportunity to enlighten is lost to junk journalism.

The fast food production methods will not be going away as long as people continue to increase the world population without thought as to "where does this food come from?" Cheap food is still important to feed the world population. Hiwever more and more people realize the value of small farm production. It comes with a higher price but the quality of the food is better and the land and animals are well cared for. Like it used to be before factory farming.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 05:18
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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The cure to climate change is going to be empowering women. Giving women an education and choices in life means having babies will be more of dedicated decision (as it should be) and they will be supported.

What we are dealing with now, population-wise, is the collision of public health drastically reducing infant mortality, while many cultures still continued reproducing like they did before public health.

My maternal grandmother came from a family of twelve, as did her mother before her. In the earlier generation, she was one of the few who survived. Next generation, same numbers of children, but they all lived.
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Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 09:45
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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TOTALLY agree with you. Here in the U.S. those options are being threatened. DH and I have many friends without children......just wish support for mothers was available here like it is in other first world countries.

Also....... in this crisis, is the mechanization of more jobs. Yesterday, watched an indepth look at automated trucking. Some think its feasible within five years.....personally, I see too many barriers to accomplish the complete replacement of a skilled trucker. The order fulfillment centers are definitely going more automated. Though the problem is becoming, according to a look at Amazon, humans cannot keep up with machines and are getting physically hurt. The level of production expected is beyond human ability.

We need fewer and fewer humans to do jobs.

Yet, I read a wonderdul indepth look at cheese making in a Sep 2019 issue of a Wine magazine while sitting at eye doctors..... specifically, Vermont has a xillion small artisan cheese makers now, all since the 1980's. Other states were also featured.

I also see the poor quality foods the poorest eat in my region and look at their poor health. The two go g
hand in hand according to my math brain. The richest can afford the farm food at the farmers market, which is in the richest town around. Im not paying $6 for a one cup jar of freshly ground nut butter.... but many people do. Others pay $26 for an organic chicken.

CHICKENS should be in every backyard. Chickens are great at eating scrap food. And mine scour my farm for good things to eat. They make meat and eggs out of the bugs, grasses and compost thru the summer......very little grain in the summer.....

My point is most of us can have chickens, even if just for eggs. There is a reason the breeds of chickens developed over the centuries far exceeds the breeds of cattle.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Nov-29-19 at 11:26.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 11:37
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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I also wish there had been focus on the difference between monoculture and integrated production.

Acres and acres of one crop is invitation to pests. When I dug into IPM , I grew marigolds and nasturuums to plant thruout the garden. Beans grew up the poles supporting the tomatoes. A classic is the three sisters, corn, beans and squash planted together. More and more producers are serious about returning to mixing different produce to decrease need for chemical herbicides and pesticides by looking at how nature does it.

Of course this requires hands on work, and no space for huge machinery. And brings back small farming.


Today our squash supply was moved from stairway to cooler basement. Now that the woodstove has been restored, its blasting out the heat. ( Our woods supply the wood.) The kale is still in the garden, waiting to be harvested. Scallions too. Though I did pot up a few to grow in a window thru the winter. And potted up parsley, too.

Gotta go..... garlic needs planting.
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Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 13:39
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Little Me Little Me is offline
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With all due respect, if we all had chickens the coyote population would zoom out of control.
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 16:46
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Me
With all due respect, if we all had chickens the coyote population would zoom out of control.


Yes I agree, when they're fed they explode in their numbers.
Throughout the Texas countryside the feral hog population has exploded and I think a lot of it has to do with all of the deer feeders people put out to attract deer. We have some cayote and possibly wolves as per one track I took a pic of also Bobcats and possible cougars as per sightings but at the rate that the hogs multiply it's totally out of control.
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Old Fri, Nov-29-19, 22:15
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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My girls come into the barn to roost, eat if they want and get water.When hens have a hatch, they bring them to the house. Hens and their chicks are rounded up and penned for a number of months.

Roosters guard the hens. One always is on duty so the other can eat. Quite a tag team. We do lose a few, for sure. But the open woods allow the roosters a good view.

My birds dont stay in the woods all day. They head for home at the end of the day.

Best to coop up birds at night to protect them from predators.

Picking the right breed is important!

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Nov-29-19 at 22:21.
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