Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sun, Dec-27-20, 04:43
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default Dr Rangan Chatterjee: Why diets don’t work

Quote:
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: Why diets don’t work – and how to lose weight without them

Dr Chatterjee’s new book – serialised this week in The Telegraph – sets out to unpick the complexities of our relationship with food


Dr Rangan Chatterjee decided to write a book about losing weight long before we’d heard the word Covid. But after a year when it was heralded as a surefire way to reduce your risk of complications from the virus, he admits that “weight loss is probably more relevant now than it’s even been.”

“It wasn’t intentional,” Chatterjee tells me over Zoom from his home in Cheshire, where he lives with his wife and two young children. “But for several years I felt like we were missing a big part of the weight loss puzzle. We all know we need to eat less and move more. And at its core level, that is correct: if you burn more calories than you consume you will lose weight. But that message just isn’t working, because the reality is far more complex.”

Chatterjee, who has been a practising GP for almost 20 years, has always been interested in human behaviour and habit (he spent six months researching the science of both while writing his last book, the bestselling Feel Better in Five, which encouraged slotting tiny health habits into your day to make a big difference), and sees it played out in his surgery.

And despite the renewed focus on Britain’s obesity problem this year, he still feels that the messaging is failing in one key respect.

“The trouble with weight loss advice, whether it’s from the Government, medics or traditional diets, is that it often makes people feel bad. During the pandemic, the Government narrative was: ‘Come on guys, take responsibility for yourselves. If you want to save the NHS, you have to lose weight.’ I sat back and thought, ‘You’re barking up the wrong tree there, Boris.’

“If anybody has spent any real time listening to people’s stories about weight gain and dieting, they’ll know that shame is a toxic emotion that has never helped anybody lose weight in the long term. I really believe we need a deeper understanding of the reasons why people overeat and what drives their behaviour around food before we simply tell them to eat less.”

His new book, Feel Great Lose Weight, which is serialised all this week in The Telegraph, sets out to unpick these complexities. He breaks things down into five sections: what, why, when, how and where we eat, how to eat well, why our emotions cause us to overeat, why timing of meals is crucial, the importance of eating mindfully, and finally, how our environment is partly to blame for rising obesity.

On that subject, early on in the book Chatterjee announces it a ‘blame-free zone’. He cites an example during our interview, that’s also in the book, about a female patient who came to see him who was very overweight and struggling to lose it. When her story unravelled, it transpired she had been a victim of domestic violence and after her relationship ended, she had gained a lot of weight. During therapy she admitted that she (wrongly) believed being overweight was in some way a protective measure to stop anybody from falling in love with her. Staying overweight, she reasoned, kept her ‘safe’.

“You don’t often read about domestic violence in a diet book, but that’s why I believe this is so much more than a diet book,” says Chatterjee. “As a GP I know first hand how complicated weight can be, how far it stretches back into our childhood, how it’s interwoven with other issues. You can’t judge somebody for being overweight, or assume they’re lazy. For somebody like my patient, it’s a reaction to domestic abuse.

“For others it’s less extreme. It could be that they get home from work at 8pm from a high-stress job and are too wrung out to cook, or they’re lonely and eat ice-cream to find joy. For many, eating isn’t so much about willpower as it is about self-worth or stress levels.

"I’m a GP and I’ve got the number one health podcast in the UK, but even I had a problem with sugar during lockdown because I was so stressed out. I knew it wasn’t good for me. But what and why we eat often goes deeper than that. If you’re stressed, hormonal changes take place in your body that cause you to crave certain foods. People aren’t weak-willed; they’re struggling.”

Yet despite the sympathetic approach of the book, when he announced on Instagram he was writing a new book, this time about weight loss (as well as Feel Better in Five, he has also written two best-selling books on stress), he had what he calls “a bit of push back” from some of his 220,000 followers.

“They hadn’t read the book because it wasn’t out yet, but some of the messages I received said things like: ‘I can’t believe you’re putting out a diet book’ and ‘I thought you were better than this Dr Chatterjee’. It didn’t feel great if I’m honest. So I stepped back, did a bit of self-reflection, and tried to understand why they felt that way.”

The answer, he thinks, is the fact terms like weight and diet have become emotive subjects in recent years. On Instagram, body positivity encourages people to love their bodies no matter their size. But Chatterjee feels this reaction misses the point of his book. “For a start, it’s not a diet book, at least not in the conventional sense. There is no plan to follow. There is no talk of dropping dress sizes.”

But given the link between obesity and Covid, not to mention the other illnesses that being overweight raises the risk of, from heart disease to cancer, Chatterjee thinks a conversation about weight is valid and much needed. He cites England’s former chief medical officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies, who recently claimed thousands of Covid deaths could have been avoided if ministers had tackled the UK’s rising obesity crisis.

“This is something we need to talk about, albeit in a kind and supportive way,” says Chatterjee. “I’m a generalist – I’m a GP – so I’ve always taken a 360-degree approach to health. From working in a surgery, I’ve realised that people aren’t weak-willed or greedy, but they need help to find a sustainable approach to losing weight that suits their lifestyle. That’s the key. You can’t tell somebody who is lonely to eat less sugar, and you can’t tell somebody who works 14-hour days to spend an hour cooking every night.”

On the subject of cooking, Chatterjee makes a refreshing call in his book for people to be more accepting of simple, straightforward meals rather than the elaborate and beautifully displayed ones we see on cookery shows and posted on Instagram: “Countries with the lowest obesity rates often eat bland and repetitive foods. I’m not saying you can’t enjoy delicious, flavoursome foods. But neither do I think you should strive to make every meal mind-blowingly tasty. Food has become a status symbol. There’s a place for that type of food, but it makes things harder because it teaches our taste buds to seek out ‘blissy’ foods [his term for processed, high fat, sugar and salt foods, which are irresistible to the human brain].”

Of exercise, he says it shouldn’t be a part of the weight loss equation. “Movement should never be associated with burning off calories. It’s simply a way to make you feel more alive, more energetic, to help you sleep better and strengthen your joints and muscles. Those are the reasons we should move every day, not to burn calories.”

His book explores how our environments have changed in the last 40 years and how that has contributed to rising obesity levels: “The Eighties changed everything in terms of food and weight, and it was when the [obesity] curve started going up. Humans didn’t suddenly become lazy and gluttonous back then, but rather food manufacturers started making cheap, energy-dense processed food available wherever we looked, snacking became normal and our jobs became more sedentary.

“We didn’t change, the world around us did. But don’t despair, because there’s plenty you can do about it.”


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...weight-without/
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Sun, Dec-27-20, 06:41
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 21,975
 
Plan: Primal
Stats: 171/155/155 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

I really like Dr Chatterjee. I don't see myself buying the book only because he's already preaching to the choir. I agree with practically every point made here.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Sun, Dec-27-20, 07:03
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,551
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

I've followed Dr. Chatterjee over the last few years. He's making a difference with his patients by helping them to find the right path to a healthy lifestyle. Good to read that he's sharing it in a book.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Mon, Dec-28-20, 02:37
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine
I really like Dr Chatterjee. I don't see myself buying the book only because he's already preaching to the choir. I agree with practically every point made here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I've followed Dr. Chatterjee over the last few years. He's making a difference with his patients by helping them to find the right path to a healthy lifestyle. Good to read that he's sharing it in a book.
Good to see another couple of other fans of Dr C here, and Kristine, agree that he's already preaching to the choir here. There are though a lot of people out there who could really do with listening to (and reading) what he has to say, and hopefully his book will resonant and possibly changed their lives.

I have ordered a copy of his book, and look forward to receiving it on Thursday when it's published.

In the meantime, and for those who won't be buying it, The Telegraph is publishing extracts from it this week.

Last edited by Demi : Mon, Dec-28-20 at 02:49.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Mon, Dec-28-20, 02:40
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: The ‘rules’ around food seem to keep changing – but the basics are constant

In the first part of Dr Chatterjee’s series on how to lose weight without dieting, he asks you to consider the simple changes you can make


If you’re someone who struggles with maintaining a healthy weight, and tends to judge yourself negatively, I have something important to tell you. It honestly can’t wait a moment longer. It’s harder for you. Truly.

If you’re struggling with excess weight, it’s because you’re different. You have a different body, which is functioning in a different way and has been on a different life journey to all those people who seem to be able to maintain a healthy weight so effortlessly. It’s not your fault.

Over the past twenty years of seeing patients, I’ve witnessed the same thing in my surgery time and time again. People come in full of enthusiasm about some trendy new weight-loss plan, convinced it’s the final answer they’ve been looking for. But when I see them a few months later, they’re back to where they started – or worse. It’s heartbreaking to witness but it’s also, sadly, predictable.

Conventional diets generally don’t work because they put people on a regime of hunger and willpower that’s simply not sustainable. They also fail because they usually tackle only one or two areas of life – what you’re eating and how you’re moving – rather than treating the whole life and the whole person.

My new book sets out to help people understand the true causes of their weight gain – and help you lose weight in a responsible, sustainable way, and in a way that’s going to make you more energetic, increase your self-esteem and live longer.

You’re not going to be surprised to hear that food’s going to be a major part of your weight-loss journey. You don’t need me to tell you that eating less sugar and cutting back on pastries is going to be a good idea. You already know that. It’s not necessarily a lack of information that’s causing you to carry excess weight.

In fact, I’d argue there’s too much information out there. Every month there seems to be a new set of rules for healthy eating. One day we’re off carbs, the next it’s all about Paleo or plant-based food. The problem with all this back and forth is that it can lead us to think, “Well, the experts don’t know the answer, so what’s the point in trying?”

But there are some things we’re pretty sure about…

Eat more real food

This is one of the most powerful pieces of health advice I can give anyone. What I mean by “real food” is food that’s minimally processed, close to its natural state and instantly recognisable – fish that looks like fish, meat that looks like meat, vegetables that look like vegetables. It’s often the biggest game-changer and leads to people feeling better in every way: mind, body and heart. This one simple habit has three almost magical benefits:

1. You’ll feel less hungry.
2. Your body will automatically manage your weight for you.
3. You’ll be less tempted to eat what I call “blissy foods”.

Avoid ‘blissy foods’

These are products that are about as far away as possible from the real foods I’d like you to eat. They’re often created by scientists who know that certain foods have a powerful effect on our hunger signals. This is how they make their products so devilishly successful. Anyone determined to eat healthily is pitting themselves against teams of incredibly smart people who’ve spent decades designing foods that are utterly irresistible to the human brain. These chocolate bars, crisps, sweets and salty, fatty meals have been engineered to hammer at your hunger signals.

Food manufacturers know that when you open that bag of crisps it will be extremely hard to stop eating them, and that one chunk of chocolate can so easily lead to eating the whole bar. These foods have been deliberately built that way. Our brains are wired to uniquely respond to a few specific properties in food, including certain kinds of carbs, starch, sugar, protein, fat, salt and the savoury “umami” flavour which is found in foods like cooked meats, broths and seaweed.

When our food contains these flavours in certain combinations, the brain releases a chemical called dopamine, which has a powerful effect on our behaviour and impacts the food choices that we make. In fact, once we’ve eaten these foods and experienced the “bliss” they provide, our brains will even release dopamine in anticipation of eating these foods again.

Avoid foods with ingredient labels

I’d like you to eat more real food by focusing on one-ingredient foods. These are foods that don’t tend to come with ingredient labels. Examples include carrots, apples, potatoes, avocados, fish, eggs and beans. Have you ever noticed that we don’t form habits and cravings for these types of foods? Try your best to ensure that the majority of your diet is made up of foods like these – either eaten by themselves or combined together in simple wholefood meals.

These simple, real foods don’t naturally come in blissy combinations of fat-salt-sweet. They’re not designed in a laboratory to stimulate the dopamine-releasing regions of the brain. Nor do they drive up levels of inflammation in the body and play havoc with the body’s natural hunger and fullness signals. In effect, they work with your body and not against it.

Six tips to help you eat more one-ingredient foods

1. Shop on the outermost aisles of the supermarket. Most one-ingredient foods tend to live here.
2. Keep frozen vegetables in the house at all times. They are easy to steam, cheap to buy and can be super-tasty, especially with the simple addition of herbs and spices.
3. Keep chopped garlic and onions in the fridge or freezer to speed up cooking and preparation time.
4. Use herbs and spices freely. They are a simple and healthy way to add more flavour to real-food meals.
5. Stock up on one-ingredient store cupboard essentials such as tinned tomatoes, canned fish, coconut milk, lentils, beans, brown rice, nuts, etc. – so you always have something at hand when hungry or ready to cook.
6. Batch cook at the weekends (or another convenient time) so you always have real-food options for later in the week when you may have less time.

Quench your hunger

Drink a glass of water 30 minutes before each meal. Sometimes we can get our signals confused and feel hungry when we’re actually thirsty. I’ve seen countless patients for whom simply drinking a large glass of water 30 minutes before each meal has resulted in them feeling less hungry and eating less.

Prioritise protein

While my overall rule is to simply eat real food, there is one kind of food that deserves special attention when it comes to losing fat, and that’s protein. There are three main reasons I recommend eating more protein: Firstly, it is well established that protein is extremely satiating, which means that it will help you feel full sooner than fat or carbs. Secondly, digesting protein utilises more energy than other foods, which is helpful when trying to lose weight. And, thirdly, protein helps maintain muscle mass, and the more of that you have, the more likely it is that your weight point will move down and stay there.

TOMORROW: Read part 2 of our exclusive four-part serialisation of Feel Great Lose Weight by Dr Rangan Chatterjee (published by Penguin Life on December 31).

Dr Chatterjee launches a new show on BBC Radio 2 and BBC Sounds from Sunday 24 January, 10pm-midnight

Join Dr Chatterjee for a virtual discussion on weight loss, as part of our January Health Reset events. Book tickets at telegraph.co.uk/events


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...-keep-changing/
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Tue, Dec-29-20, 01:48
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: To slim down, stop eating your feelings

In the second part of Dr Rangan Chatterjee’s series on how to lose weight without dieting, he focuses on the role our emotions play


When we talk about weight loss, we often talk exclusively about food and exercise. We are told that if we want to lose fat, all we need to focus on is the right kind of diet, and the right type of workout. This kind of thinking has dominated the conversation around weight loss for decades and not only is it misleading, it is largely unhelpful.

There are so many other parts of a person’s life that can contribute to their weight – emotional problems such as stress, loneliness and depression, for example. Time and time again, I’ve seen people who successfully change their diets, but are able to lose weight only after they’ve tackled their stress levels and any emotional factors that were playing a huge role.

If we are to lose weight and keep it off for good, we need to explore why we’re eating too much and why we continue to eat foods that we know are sabotaging our efforts. This means going on a journey of self discovery, and understanding why we’ve developed a difficult relationship with food in the first place. For many people, this challenge will be the most important.

Are you eating your emotions?

One of my favourite quotes is by Viktor Frankl, the psychotherapist. He wrote: “When a person can’t find a deep sense of meaning, they distract themselves with pleasure.”

I think this tells us so much about our problematic relationship with food. I see it playing out all the time in my surgery. People use food to treat their sadness, their stress and their loneliness. When their lives feel like they’ve got a gap in them, for whatever reason, they’ll plug it up with pizza.

I’m sure you’ve done this. I know I have. When I feel weary and a bit down, I’ll sneakily prescribe myself a chocolate bar or something sweet, and do you know what? It will help me feel better – for about 90 seconds.

It’s the same when I’m on long book tours in unfamiliar countries. When I’m away from my wife and children and there are no arms around to hug me, I’m tempted to run towards the chemical hug of some “blissy” foods that are just a quick dial of room-service away.

I’m not starving for energy, I’m starving for love.

Before diet or exercise, work on your sleep

After a terrible night’s sleep, we’re not craving fruit and veg and a cool glass of water from the tap. No chance. We want chocolates and doughnuts and pastries oozing with cream. This is why, if you’re struggling with excess weight that just won’t shift, sleep should be the very first thing you should look at, even before food and exercise.

Sleep deprivation makes weight gain much more likely. When you haven’t slept well, everything else you’re trying to achieve becomes much tougher. You’ll find it hard to resist tempting foods, you’ll be more emotionally reactive, hungrier for less healthy foods and, when you do eat, it will take you longer to feel full. Starting your weight-loss journey without sorting out your sleep is like trying to juggle while riding a bike.

Beat emotional eating with the Three ‘F’ exercise

If you’re the kind of person who’s drawn to food when you’re sad, lonely, angry, bored or stressed, I’d like you to do the following exercise:

FEEL: Write down how you feel when you experience a craving. Is it really hunger or is it something else entirely? Do you feel stressed or lonely? Has something just happened that’s made you feel bad or out of control? This will get easier with practice.

FEED: Now that you have identified the feeling, turn your attention to how you try to feed that feeling and resolve the underlying emotion with food. What do you choose to eat? When you consume your chosen food, how does it change the way you feel? Does it make you happier? Does it make you feel calmer? Do you feel less stressed? Or on the other hand, does the food do nothing to address the underlying feeling – is it simply a distraction?

FIND: Find a way to deal with the underlying feeling that does not involve food. Next time you feel a difficult emotion that you’re tempted to try and resolve with food, experiment with some of these effective alternatives instead:
  •  Try one minute of intense activity such as star jumps, press-ups, squats, skipping or dancing to an upbeat tune that makes you feel good.
  • Do a relaxing activity, such as yoga or meditation, either in silence or using an app such as Calm or Headspace.
  • Write down how you are feeling. Simply giving your feelings a name and seeing them written down is incredibly therapeutic.
  •  Phone a friend or perform an act of kindness.
  • Try taking a short nap, having a shower or a relaxing bath.
  • Drink a large glass of water – sparkling can be really effective!
  • Go to a different room where you don’t usually snack – we often get used to certain behaviours in specific environments, for example eating crisps on the sofa.


Join Dr Chatterjee for a virtual discussion on weight loss, as part of our January Health Reset events. Book tickets at telegraph.co.uk/events



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...ating-feelings/
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Tue, Dec-29-20, 09:49
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,551
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Very good information from Dr. Chatterjee. I like the quote from Viktor Frankl, as his book, "Man's Search for Meaning" is one of the most compelling books I've read, as he describes his experiences and how he dealt with his time in a Nazi prison camp early in his professional life.

Dealing with the emotional eating aspect of one's lifestyle is often ignored, as if we can simply press a button by eating the "right" foods and turn off years of behavior by simply watching the weight melt away. We all know it's part of the equation, but often don't have the tools to confront this important topic.

I also like his approach to selecting healthy, whole foods with emphasis on protein. Thanks, Demi, for sharing this.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Wed, Dec-30-20, 01:40
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: Change when (not what) you eat to lose weight

In part three of our serialisation of his new book, Dr Rangan Chatterjee explains how a 12-hour eating window can help you shed pounds


One of the most astonishing discoveries weight-loss researchers have made in recent years is that when we eat might be just as important as what we eat. Over the past few years, numerous studies have suggested that if you eat the majority of your calories earlier in the day, you can end up losing more weight than if you eat those same calories later on and into the evening.

Scientists now know that the times of the day we choose to eat, and how often, can have a significant effect on how much weight we put on. This is because the timing and frequency of our food affects the working of our signals.

How snacking disrupts the body’s signals

One reason obesity has been soaring over the last few decades is that we’ve dramatically increased how frequently we’re putting fuel into our systems. Back in the 1970s, most of us ate just three meals per day. But things are very different now.

Our store-fat signals are influenced by the hormone insulin. Whenever we eat, insulin is released, which informs our body that fuel has become available. It instructs the body not to break down the fat it already has on board. So if you’re eating small meals and snacks multiple times a day (especially if they are highly processed), your body is being flooded with regular releases of insulin, which means it is never being allowed to break its own energy stores down and is constantly stuck in the store-fat mode. Essentially, you are never giving your body enough of a break from food to allow it to start burning off your existing fat stores.

Time-restricted eating

We’re not designed to be digesting food all day long. This is why reducing the hours in which we eat to a limited window can be a great idea. In 2018, one set of scientists compared a group of people who ate their meals over an entire day with those who ate all their meals within just eight hours. Remarkably, at the end of eight weeks, the second group, who did all their eating inside a compressed time window, showed a marked reduction in fat, even though the amount of calories eaten was the same between each group.

Rather than changing what they ate, they changed when they ate. Time-restricted eating has proved to be an effective strategy with plenty of my patients, readers and podcast listeners. Many prefer to start off with a 12-hour window (for example, eating between 8am and 8pm), which should be manageable for most, and then move it down to 10 or eight hours. My clinical experience has shown that, in isolation, it may not work for everyone when it comes to losing weight, but I would strongly encourage you to at least go for the 12-hour window. Let’s not forget, this was probably the norm for everyone on Earth as recently as 50 years ago. It’s only because our eating habits have changed so much that we’ve had to give a special name to what’s been a normal part of the human routine forever.

How to do it
  • Document when you eat your first bite of food and when you eat your last bite over the course of a week.
  • Pick a 12-hour window that fits your lifestyle – for example, have breakfast at 7am and finish dinner by 7pm. Don’t feel disheartened if the first week is tough. Give your body time to adjust. Don’t be afraid to try different eating windows to see if they work better.
  • Encourage any other adults in your household to participate. Behaviour change is always easier when other people are involved.
  • Pay attention to how you feel when you are eating this way. Does your hunger change? Do you sleep better? Do your symptoms of poor digestion improve? Write down any benefits daily.
  • When a 12-hour eating window becomes a doddle, experiment with 11, and then 10. But don’t push it too far beyond your comfort zone because it needs to be sustainable.
  • You can drink water, herbal teas and non-sugared black tea or coffee outside your eating window

If you have type 2 diabetes or are on any blood sugar lowering medications, talk to your doctor before you go for prolonged periods without eating.

In addition to fat loss, restricting your eating window may also help you reduce hunger and snacking, improve sleep, improve digestive symptoms like heartburn, stabilise blood sugar, support your immune system, increase energy, reduce inflammation, improve IBS symptoms.
Quote:
How time-restricted eating helped my patient shed the pounds in three months

One of the most satisfying cases I’ve had recently was Shilpa, who had been overweight since childhood. Because her family had problems with their weight, she assumed it was in her genes and that there was nothing she could do about it.

She worked as a PA at a law firm and I could tell that she was a naturally organised person who thrived on order, so I asked if she’d heard of time-restricted eating. She immediately liked the sound of it.

We chatted about her eating schedule. She had a one-hour commute and would eat two slices of toast at 6.30am before leaving for the station. She’d get home at 7.30pm and would eat dinner at 8pm. Finally, she’d curl up in front of the telly with a packet of sweets, which would usually last her until 10pm. This made her eating window just over 15 hours.

Initially, I asked her to reduce it to 12. Instead of toast, she would take a couple of boiled eggs into work with her and eat them at 8.30am. She also tried to drop those after-dinner sweets, which she found challenging at first.

However, within days, she felt better. Her sleep quality had improved and she felt lighter and more energetic. She thought that she already slept well, but when she woke up feeling ready to bounce out of bed, she realised how wrong she’d been.

She moved her eating window down to 10 hours, delaying breakfast until her mid-morning break at work. Over the course of a few weeks, she noticed that her IBS-type digestive symptoms had improved significantly as well.

Once Shilpa’s body got used to her eating window, her system adapted and her signals changed so she felt less hungry. She was more productive at work and felt better about herself.

Finding herself much more energetic in the evenings, she joined a martial arts class, which was something she’d always wanted to do but always felt she was too heavy. She took the lessons not to burn calories but because they made her feel good. But guess what? Her weight fell off. Within three months, she was slimmer than she’d ever been in her adult life, and she’d barely made many changes to her diet at all.




https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...at-lose-weight/
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Wed, Dec-30-20, 07:04
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,140
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Prioritise protein


Brilliant! And the polar opposite of the vegan propaganda.
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Wed, Dec-30-20, 07:54
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,568
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Quote:
I’d like you to eat more real food by focusing on one-ingredient foods. These are foods that don’t tend to come with ingredient labels. Examples include carrots, apples, potatoes, avocados, fish, eggs and beans.

A medium-sized apple has about 20 grams of sugar. A sugar cube has 4 grams. So eating just one apple is the equivalent of eating 5 sugar cubes.
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Wed, Dec-30-20, 09:19
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,551
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
A medium-sized apple has about 20 grams of sugar. A sugar cube has 4 grams. So eating just one apple is the equivalent of eating 5 sugar cubes.

That's true, and eating any of the foods mentioned as whole foods in this part would cause me problems. I believe the issue in this case is that with the population's routine consumption of processed and frankenfoods, Dr. C is attempting to move the needle away from the manufactured stuff to the less harmful, whole foods. For young people, this is a good first step, as the metabolic damage is still in the early stages. For those who are older and already damaged metabolically, a more strict LC approach is necessary. Preaching to the choir here on this forum.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Thu, Dec-31-20, 01:51
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,391
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/209/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: The small changes that can make a big difference to your health

In the final part of our serialisation of Dr Rangan Chatterjee’s new book on losing weight without dieting, he shows why environment matters


London’s Euston Station must be one of the unhealthiest places in the country. It’s a vast hall, seemingly always crammed with tired and stressed-out people, and its walls are lined with shops that sell sweets, crisps and sugary drinks and fast food outlets that pump the tempting scents of cooking meat and bread out over the crowds.

Before lockdown, I spent a lot of time at Euston because it’s where I catch my train back home up north. Time and time again I’ve found myself there, exhausted and irritable, staring at bags of tempting sweets. And, on many occasions, I’ll crack. I’ll look over my shoulder to check I’ve not been spotted, grab what I want, rush to the checkout and then hide the bag in my coat pocket, shoving the sweets in my mouth one by one.

But afterwards, when I’m on the train, I don’t beat myself up like I used to. Yes, I cracked. But that doesn’t mean I’m a bad person. It means I’m tired, stressed, tempted and human. In a way, all of modern life is a bit like Euston Station.

Stress and sedentary living make weight gain easier

You could hardly design a better scenario than 21st-century life for making a lot of people overweight. We’re sleep-deprived, and that makes us crave more calorie-dense foods. Our jobs make us sit at desks and in trains, buses and cars, so we’re not moving enough to send our bodies the signal that we are active, thriving humans.

We’re stressed out in our work, family and home lives, which makes our bodies think we’re in a hostile place, so they hold on to more fat. On top of all that, it’s hard for many of us to get easy access to healthy and affordable wholefoods. And what’s the result? Soaring obesity rates. In 1992, 53 per cent of the UK population were overweight or obese. In just 20 years that number has climbed to 62 per cent. And it’s still climbing. Maybe your parents’ and grandparents’ generations could get away with eating whatever they wanted, but they weren’t living in the world of today. They didn’t have access to the types and varieties of foods that we do. I don’t believe it’s your fault if you’re carrying excess weight. By now, I hope you agree.

Eat from smaller plates

One handy hack that’s great for tweaking your hunger signals is eating your meals off smaller plates. Surprisingly, there doesn’t currently seem to be any reliable scientific research on this, but many of my patients have reported it works really well for them, and that’s good enough evidence for me.

They tell me that reducing the size of their plate by a couple of inches nudges them into eating smaller portions and being satisfied with less. This is probably because, when we’re judging anything like a portion size, the brain does so by making a comparison. What’s a large coffee in Starbucks? It’s the one that’s bigger than the medium. The same is true for food portions. A decent-sized meal will look plentiful on a smaller plate. But put it on a large one and it will seem small.

Networks matter

Last Christmas, I went out for dinner with a couple of old school friends. When it was time to look at the dessert menu, one of them said, mockingly, ‘Here we go, Rangan’s going to do his healthy-eating thing again.’ I know he didn’t mean anything by it, and to him it was only a harmless joke, but I felt a little excluded and judged. I also felt a lot of social pressure to join them in their sugary third course.

When I got home and had the chance to reflect, I couldn’t help but wonder what difference it made to him whether I ate dessert or not. Was the truth that he felt slightly guilty about his indulgence and that my not joining in made him feel worse? Were my choices acting as a mirror and reflecting back to him choices that he himself was not entirely happy with? I can’t possibly know. But I do know that our social networks can make a huge impact on how much excess weight we’re carrying.

Find your tribe

I’m not asking you to ditch your friends, but I’d like you to have access to people that will support you on your weight loss journey. Here are some ideas that may help:
  • Add some new friends into your life, who already engage in the behaviours that you desire. Do you have friends or work colleagues who are active, prioritise healthy eating and help support the people around them? Perhaps you could set up a WhatsApp group to provide ongoing support, understanding and motivation. If you already have friends like these, make an effort to see them or communicate with them regularly.
  •  Join a local class or group that will help connect you to like-minded people in your neighbourhood. Examples might be yoga, Pilates, martial arts or dancing. Pick something that you’ve always wanted to do and something that will make you feel good. Of course, a lot of activities can be done and learned online these days, but there is something powerful about connecting in person with people who have similar interests.
  • Join a supportive online community. If you are struggling to find one, I’d love to see you on my own Facebook community which is full of like-minded people who are supporting each other on their health journeys.
Quote:
Six ways to create healthier habits

1. Keep a water bottle or jug visible. Make it attractive so you feel great when you see it. If helpful, put some chopped cucumber, sliced orange or fresh mint in the water.

2. Keep vegetables at eye level in the fridge, not hidden in the bottom drawers.

3. Keep a kettlebell or dumbbell in the kitchen by the kettle. Each time you walk by, you are being visually prompted to pick it up. Why not do some bicep curls every time you walk by? Before you know it, this will seem effortless and a normal everyday habit, just like brushing your teeth.

4. Ditch the scales. If our weight goes up by two pounds, we think we’ve done something bad. If it drops, we think we’ve done something good. In reality, we’ve often done nothing different. Weight can fluctuate by up to 10 pounds a day. Some studies suggest using scales can even slow weight loss, as they can encourage people to go off plan if they are not making the progress they think they should be making.

5. Keep your bedroom clean and calm. Have a dim bedside light by your bed, to encourage reading. Move your phone charger outside the bedroom. Consider removing your television. Keep a journal on your bedside table to write down your worries or to-do list before you go to sleep.

6. Keep fruit and unsalted nuts, preferably still in their shells, in your home for times when you really need a snack. Removing the shell requires effort before you can eat them, which makes them harder to gorge on.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-...ference-health/
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Thu, Dec-31-20, 05:14
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,140
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
A medium-sized apple has about 20 grams of sugar. A sugar cube has 4 grams. So eating just one apple is the equivalent of eating 5 sugar cubes.


While true, it's a lot more satiating than 5 sugar cubes, especially when eaten with a meal. He's probably learned a gradual approach will work better.

If you had thrown me into my present diet at the beginning, I'd think it was "extreme"
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Thu, Dec-31-20, 06:10
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 21,975
 
Plan: Primal
Stats: 171/155/155 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

Quote:
Join a supportive online community.


Quote:
Eat from smaller plates
This works, though it pretty much happened to me spontaneously. You learn pretty quickly that nutrient-dense LC food really doesn't take up much space. I hardly ever use dinner plates. You have to be prepared to wrap your head around that, if you were formerly like me and plowing back huge plates of food. I use sandwich plates most of the time and I rather like "soup plates" for saucy dishes like curry. I use ramekins for yogurt and cottage cheese - they hold 1/2 cup.

Quote:
3. Keep a kettlebell or dumbbell in the kitchen by the kettle. Each time you walk by, you are being visually prompted to pick it up. Why not do some bicep curls every time you walk by?
I've become a huge fan of micro-workouts. I hate working out and I'm basically not doing it unless I can do it in the same amount of time I can clean the toilet or throw on a load of laundry. I don't like doing housework, either, but it's just something that has to be done - the quicker, the better.

Quote:
4. Ditch the scales. If our weight goes up by two pounds, we think we’ve done something bad. If it drops, we think we’ve done something good. In reality, we’ve often done nothing different.
This, I respectfully disagree with, depending on your psychology. I think most of us need to get desensitized to the fluctuations, and/or figure out what they can mean. Daily weighing has helped me track unpredictable menopause-era menstrual cycles, effects from foods, medications, symptoms of edema, dehydration, etc. If you can treat it as data, do it.

Quote:
5. Keep your bedroom clean and calm. Have a dim bedside light by your bed, to encourage reading. Move your phone charger outside the bedroom. Consider removing your television.
These, I agree with, except my phone is my alarm and my flashlight if power goes out. But I have ZERO screen time once I'm in bed. I've had no TV in the room since I was 19 and lived in a single room.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Thu, Dec-31-20, 07:32
BawdyWench's Avatar
BawdyWench BawdyWench is offline
Posts: 8,268
 
Plan: High-Protein Keto
Stats: 212/197/170 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 36%
Location: Rural Maine
Default

I do balance exercises when I'm cooking. Balance on one foot for 30 seconds or more, change and balance on the other foot. These I can do without support. Another balance I do is on the toes of one foot (then the other), but need to at least touch the counter for support on these.

I agree with Kristine on the scale. For me, anyway, I can gain almost 10 pounds before my pants start feeling tight. Best to nip any gain in the bud before it becomes that much harder to lose.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 20:39.


Copyright © 2000-2021 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.