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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 15:47
nobimbo's Avatar
nobimbo nobimbo is offline
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Default High Carb Diet Linked To Weight Loss (fishy study)

I'm sure this will be all over the news tonight. Be prepared!

http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/7801389.htm

Posted on Mon, Jan. 26, 2004

Study links high-carbs and weight loss
By LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press

CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories - and without exercising, either.

The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate the recommended diet for three months; ate the recommended diet and exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they usually eat.

All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.

Many doctors dispute whether people can lose weight without reducing their food intake, and at least one questioned the study's accuracy.

But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful eating than the fatty, low-carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.

Participants on the recommended diet lost about 7 pounds without cutting calories and without exercise, and almost 11 pounds with 45 minutes of stationary bike-riding four times weekly. The control group lost no weight.

The findings appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine.

Gary Foster, clinical director of the University of Pennsylvania's Weight and Eating Disorders Program, said he suspects participants who lost weight ate less than what was reported. He said that while he recommends a low-fat, high carb diet to patients, without calorie reduction it would be "a public health disaster."

"The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake flies in the face of 100 years of data," Foster said.

Lead author William Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences stood by his findings.

"Calories in minus calories out does not always determine the amount of weight loss," Evans said. "This is because we metabolize fats and carbohydrates very differently."

American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Cindy Moore agreed and said with low-carb diets hogging the spotlight, "it may be a reminder that we can lose weight in a variety of different ways."

Foods on the successful diets included high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili, whole-wheat spaghetti, many fruits and vegetables, and skim milk. Daily calories totaled about 2,400, similar to participants' usual consumption.

The control group also received prepared meals with similar calories, but the foods included sausage, scrambled eggs, macaroni and cheese, French fries, whole milk and fewer fruits and vegetables.

The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb regimens, which contain more fat and fewer carbs than the control group diet.

Linda
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 17:20
gotbeer's Avatar
gotbeer gotbeer is offline
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Plan: Atkins
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Yikes! Almost 60 reprints on google so far already.

Now you can say "we didn't test Atkins" and still ring everyone's bell because you MENTIONED Atkins!
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 17:28
gotbeer's Avatar
gotbeer gotbeer is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 280/203/200 Male 69 inches
BF:
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here's the actual study:

link to study

Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body Weight, Body Composition, and Fat Distribution in Older Men and Women

A Randomized Controlled Trial

Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD; Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A. Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD; William J. Evans, PhD

Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.


Background The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and fat in overweight and obese adults remains controversial.

Methods We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high–complex carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO) and in combination with aerobic exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean ± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years). Participants were randomly assigned to a control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and 7 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63% carbohydrates, and 26 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen consumption (HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy needs and were instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate, and substrate oxidation were measured.

Results There was no significant difference in total food intake among the 3 groups and no change in energy intake over time. The HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8 ± 0.9 kg [P = .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls (–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ± 0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P<.001) groups compared with controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

Conclusion A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at energy restriction or change in energy intake, results in losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.


From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock. Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, Conn. The authors have no relevant financial interest in this article.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 17:38
gotbeer's Avatar
gotbeer gotbeer is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 280/203/200 Male 69 inches
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related article:

Fighting Diabetes With Carbs

NEW YORK, Jan.26, 2004


http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004...ain596040.shtml

(CBS) For 64-year-old Ruthie Gentry-Ford, it's been a nagging concern her whole life.

"Some day I may be a candidate for diabetes if I don't continue to watch my weight," she says.

Like millions of other overweight elderly Americans, the pressure to slim down and avoid diabetes is huge and, as CBS News Correspondent Elizabeth Kaledin reports, finding the right diet is a challenge.

But researchers at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences say a study conducted there could help.

They put dozens of people like Ruthie, ages 56 to 78 and all at risk of diabetes, on a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, but did not cut any calories.

"Lots of bagels, lots of fruit and vegetables.

Participants exercised four times a week and after 12 weeks lost an average of 11 pounds.

"Essentially what our study showed is that you can lose weight by just reducing your fat intake without reducing your total calorie intake," says Dr. William Evans.

Of course, the study contradicts the current diet craze that says fat is fine and blames weight gain on our love of carbohydrates like breads and pasta. But that's a short-term fix. Researchers say people at risk of diabetes need a diet they can stick with.

By not cutting calories, the University of Arkansas diet left its customers satisfied.

"This is a diet people can live with and should live with the rest of their lives," says Evans.

The study is too small to draw large conclusions from, but for now it's working for Gentry-Ford, except for one thing:

"Every now and then I miss the Kentucky Fried Chicken," she says.

Then she remembers how good it feels to be lowering her risk of diabetes and she digs into a turkey sandwich instead.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 17:43
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melissasvh melissasvh is offline
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Plan: Atkins (modified - no red meat)
Stats: 324/244/150 Female 5'6
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the foods the groups were given sound pretty close to SBD to me.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 18:04
gotbeer's Avatar
gotbeer gotbeer is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 280/203/200 Male 69 inches
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Progress: 96%
Location: Dallas, TX, USA
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Flaws in the study:

1. Participants knew their food was being monitored by the studiers. (not a real-world condition). This may have discouraged them from overeating.

2. Participants had no menu selections - all food was prepared for them. (not a real-world condition).

3. Participants were already diabetic or pre-diabetic, so they were under additional pressure to lose weight.

4. Did participants have real-world access to junk food, or was it restricted artificially?

5. "Researchers say people at risk of diabetes need a diet they can stick with." Just so.

6. No comparison to an Atkins alternative.

7. No long-term follow-up (yet).
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 18:15
Lisa N's Avatar
Lisa N Lisa N is offline
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Plan: Bernstein Diabetes Soluti
Stats: 260/-/145 Female 5' 3"
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one more flaw:

1) No blood test results. What happened to their HDL, LDL, Triglycerides and blood sugars?

If you're thinner, but your cardiac profile and blood glucose are worsened, are you better off?
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 18:29
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
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Plan: DANDR '92
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Default

Here't the actual study abstract .. http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/co...tract/164/2/210

Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body Weight, Body Composition, and Fat Distribution in Older Men and Women

A Randomized Controlled Trial

Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD; Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A. Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD; William J. Evans, PhD

Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.


Background - The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and fat in overweight and obese adults remains controversial.

Methods - We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high–complex carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO) and in combination with aerobic exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean ± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years). Participants were randomly assigned to a control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and 7 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63% carbohydrates, and 26 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen consumption (HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy needs and were instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate, and substrate oxidation were measured.

Results - There was no significant difference in total food intake among the 3 groups and no change in energy intake over time. The HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8 ± 0.9 kg [P = .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls (–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ± 0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P<.001) groups compared with controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

Conclusion - A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at energy restriction or change in energy intake, results in losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.


From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock. Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, Conn. The authors have no relevant financial interest in this article.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

• mean age of participants 66 ± 1 yr
• all had impaired glucose tolerance
• thigh fat decreased, but no mention of abdominal fat, which is more closely linked to insulin resistance and cardiac risk
• there's no mention of the participants' starting weights or degree of obesity, if any
• no mention of lipid profile before & after
• no mention if the impaired glucose tolerance of participants improved or worsened by the end of the study.


Doreen
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Jan-26-04, 19:31
bvtaylor's Avatar
bvtaylor bvtaylor is offline
There and Back Again
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 200/194.4/140 Female 5'3"
BF:42%/42%/20%
Progress: 9%
Location: Northern Colorado
Default Yep I agree ...

Quote:
• mean age of participants 66 ± 1 yr
• all had impaired glucose tolerance
• thigh fat decreased, but no mention of abdominal fat, which is more closely linked to insulin resistance and cardiac risk
• there's no mention of the participants' starting weights or degree of obesity, if any
• no mention of lipid profile before & after
• no mention if the impaired glucose tolerance of participants improved or worsened by the end of the study.

And to add, when they say "high" carbohydrate--looks like from the meal plans that there were a lot of whole foods (the same whole foods that Atkins recommends for maintenance) which may be a big contrast to what folks ate before the plan. We know that high+fat plus high processed carbs = heart disease. Sounds like that's what they did to the control group, whereas the test group ate more fiber, protein, and more nutrient-dense carbs. It wasn't apples to apples!

Quote:
Foods on the successful diets included high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili, whole-wheat spaghetti, many fruits and vegetables, and skim milk. Daily calories totaled about 2,400, similar to participants' usual consumption.

The control group also received prepared meals with similar calories, but the foods included sausage, scrambled eggs, macaroni and cheese, French fries, whole milk and fewer fruits and vegetables.

If you notice the "high carbohydrate" group ate 19% protein, whereas the control group only 14%. Could the weight loss have improved further with yet other combinations of nutrients?

And this is true:

Quote:
"Calories in minus calories out does not always determine the amount of weight loss," Evans said. "This is because we metabolize fats and carbohydrates very differently."
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 01:14
alaskaman alaskaman is offline
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Plan: Dr Bernstein
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Self-styled experts are always saying "we don't know the long term effects of Atkins" but in this case, we don't know the long term result of all those carbs on those pre-diabetic people. We know that a diet like that will ruin blood sugars in a diabetic - for my money (does this make me a self-styled expert?) the best way to avoid becoming a diabetic, is to eat like you already are one. That means Atkins or Bernstein. A1c readings talk, b-------- walks. Bill (4.7 A1c)
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  #11   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 11:15
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bevbme bevbme is offline
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Plan: South Beach
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Unhappy High carb diet recommeded to diabetics

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  #12   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 11:19
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bevbme bevbme is offline
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Plan: South Beach
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Ok I can't get my message in with the link-I'm inept.

I saw this on the news and hated the thought that they were feeding white bread and junk to folks in danger of developing diabeties. They lost weight but study says nothing about the effect on insulin resistance...arrrrrrgh
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  #13   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 11:53
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
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Plan: DANDR '92
Stats: 241/175/140 Female 165 cm
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hi Bev,

I've merged your post in with the thread about this study. You're right, there's no mention about insulin resistance or even blood lipids. Strictly weight and fat loss.


Doreen
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 12:34
bvtaylor's Avatar
bvtaylor bvtaylor is offline
There and Back Again
Posts: 1,590
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 200/194.4/140 Female 5'3"
BF:42%/42%/20%
Progress: 9%
Location: Northern Colorado
Default Hmmm... another way to read this study

I was thinking that based on this study, a Type I Diabetic (who doesn't produce insulin) with uncontrolled blood sugar would be considered healthy. They lose lots of weight, right? Their blood sugar is so high that without the insulin to bond with it, they burn a lot of fat (also damaging the rest of their body).

If fat loss is the only measure of health in this study, that's a pretty scary assessment.
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Jan-27-04, 14:39
TBoneMitch TBoneMitch is offline
OOOOOOOOOH YEAH!
Posts: 692
 
Plan: High Fat/IF
Stats: 215/170/160 Male 5 feet 10 inches
BF:27%/12%/8%
Progress: 82%
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Default

Yep! But you know that losing weight on Atkins, even though your blood sugar and energy normalize, your TG drops, and your HDL increases, not only has no long term study backing its efficacity (even though plenty of people have been on it since the 70s), but also encourages you to eat real food instead of processed crap!
I would not touch that fadkins diet with a ten foot pole!
(Ok, another attempt at being sarcastic here...)
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