Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Wed, Aug-12-20, 02:27
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,184
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default Sugar and processed foods undermine body’s response to exercise

Sugar and processed foods undermine body’s response to exercise

https://geneticliteracyproject.org/...se-to-exercise/

Quote:
[A] study, which involved rodents and people, suggests that eating a diet high in sugar and processed foods, which may set the stage for poor blood sugar control, could dent our long-term health in part by changing how well our bodies respond to a workout.

We already have plenty of evidence, of course, that elevated blood sugar is unhealthy. People with hyperglycemia tend to be overweight and face greater long-term risks for heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, even if, in the early stages, their condition does not meet the criteria for those diseases.

They also tend to be out of shape. In epidemiological studies, people with elevated blood sugar often also have low aerobic fitness.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Wed, Aug-12-20, 04:18
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,046
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

This is actually hilariously ironic. Just another proof of my new rule, "Whatever the 'experts say' just do the opposite."
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Wed, Aug-12-20, 13:51
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,549
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/165 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 69%
Location: Texas
Default

Are they basically saying people who don't exercise tend to be out of shape? I know sugar is unhealthy, but where did it fit into the exercise aspect?
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Wed, Aug-12-20, 17:00
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,552
 
Plan: Paleoish/Keto
Stats: 225/170/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 110%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

A set of mice were put on a diet that was high in sugar or given a drug that caused high blood sugar and were compared with a control group on standard mice chow. All the mice were exercised but after 5 months, the control group could exercise much longer than the high blood sugar groups.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 02:44
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,184
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Are they basically saying people who don't exercise tend to be out of shape? I know sugar is unhealthy, but where did it fit into the exercise aspect?


Chronic High Blood Sugar Could Tank Your Muscles’ Response to Exercise

https://www.runnersworld.com/news/a...formance-study/

Quote:
“This work shows that having consistently high blood sugar levels, whether due to dietary factors or metabolic disease, may impair our ability to improve fitness levels with aerobic training,” Sarah Lessard, Ph.D., study coauthor and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told Runner’s World. “Chronically high blood sugar levels over the course of weeks and months can change the way our muscles respond to exercise and prevent some of the positive changes that occur in muscle with regular aerobic training.”
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 08:23
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is online now
Posts: 8,087
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/226/210 Male 5' 11"
BF:Energy Unleashed
Progress: 93%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
Default

I believe it from personal experience. In the past 40 years I had at least half a dozen extended periods of low carb dieting. Every time I managed to stick with the diet consistently I ended up exercising and I enjoyed the exercise. When I returned to eating SAD the exercise routine always came to an end even though I tried to keep it going. In 2013 I was an undiagnosed T2 diabetic. I remember feeling unbelievably wiped out all the time. I rarely got out of my chair. When I did start testing my BG I found it was high all the time and through the roof when I ate anything with some carbs. In 2014 I started eating low carb as a lifestyle. Within weeks of starting the diet I again felt compelled to get up and move even though I weighed over 400 pounds and had chronic lower back pain. So not only can you not 'outrun a bad diet' if you have issues with high blood sugar the last thing that you want to do is exercise. It does seem counterintuitive that with so much glucose running through the veins why wouldn't our muscles be bursting with energy to use it? I've known people that get hyper when they've eating too much sugar. I've always just wanted to take a nap after a SAD meal. I guess some peoples carburetors get flooded and some don't. It is very possible that how high your BG goes after a meal could be the reason for the difference in behavior.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 08:59
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,708
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/234/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 38%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by khrussva
I believe it from personal experience. In the past 40 years I had at least half a dozen extended periods of low carb dieting. Every time I managed to stick with the diet consistently I ended up exercising and I enjoyed the exercise. When I returned to eating SAD the exercise routine always came to an end even though I tried to keep it going. In 2013 I was an undiagnosed T2 diabetic. I remember feeling unbelievably wiped out all the time. I rarely got out of my chair. When I did start testing my BG I found it was high all the time and through the roof when I ate anything with some carbs. In 2014 I started eating low carb as a lifestyle. Within weeks of starting the diet I again felt compelled to get up and move even though I weighed over 400 pounds and had chronic lower back pain. So not only can you not 'outrun a bad diet' if you have issues with high blood sugar the last thing that you want to do is exercise. It does seem counterintuitive that with so much glucose running through the veins why wouldn't our muscles be bursting with energy to use it? I've known people that get hyper when they've eating too much sugar. I've always just wanted to take a nap after a SAD meal. I guess some peoples carburetors get flooded and some don't. It is very possible that how high your BG goes after a meal could be the reason for the difference in behavior.



Thank you for giving your personal experience.

There are those like Bikman that study the performance of super athletes that rely on low carb-high fat for their 100 mile runs and 24hr marathons. It was clear to me as Bikman explained his work on insulin that diet was critical to high performance.

In my mind, which could have been the wrong conclusion, food choices affected the energy level in all of us.

Though I do wonder if the effect is more pronounced on those with IR, as the cells struggle to absorb glucose. The ketones bypass the mechanism that uses glucose.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Thu, Aug-13-20 at 09:17.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 12:15
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,112
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
Default

Yet mainstream "experts" still tell us to eat carbs "for energy"
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 13:10
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,708
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/234/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 38%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Yes, but the low carb voice is getting louder.
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Thu, Aug-13-20, 13:45
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,549
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/165 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 69%
Location: Texas
Default

In a typical person relying on carbohydrate for fuel (not conditioned to burn fat for fuel due to sufficiently long time on a low carb eating pattern) eaten carbs will make a difference in energy levels. Basically this person is stuck having to refuel carbs every few hours during their waking day or they will run low on energy as glucose is cleared from the bloodstream and fat can't be efficiently used. Years ago two family members went on a long canyon hike, one fat-adapted and the other carb-burning. The carb burner after expending all fuel from packed carbohydrate energy bars finally managed to drag back up out of the canyon really wiped out and sick with the other just fine. Had bonked due to glycogen depletion over the hours of hiking. After a dose of pink nausea pills to settle the stomach, then a pint of chocolate milk, recovered in about 15 minutes and fine after that. Interesting to observe the differences in performance due to differing fuel usage. Since I've never watched a marathon or long bike race it was my first time witnessing the bonk/hit-the-wall out of glycogen phenomenon. Just grateful I had read about it before so immediately recognized the symptoms and what to do to treat it. One of the things I like about my own low-carb diet, being an efficient fat burner, is not being dependent on outside sources of food for fuel. I may get a grumbling stomach but still can continue exercising without eating for as long as I want. All the food I need already inside me.
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Fri, Aug-14-20, 02:40
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 13,046
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
One of the things I like about my own low-carb diet, being an efficient fat burner, is not being dependent on outside sources of food for fuel. I may get a grumbling stomach but still can continue exercising without eating for as long as I want. All the food I need already inside me.


I agree. Knowing I can shrug off a missed meal, or even two, without the Hangries is so liberating.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Fri, Aug-14-20, 04:57
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 708
 
Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
Stats: 250/179/165 Female 5 feet 6 inches
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
Default

Unfortunately, the concept of "carb loading" before exercise has a firm hold on fitness advocates - surprisingly even among diabetics.

How sad that politics dominate medical information
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Fri, Aug-14-20, 10:17
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 14,708
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/234/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 38%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Yup. Talked to a middle aged veterinarian about keto . She politely listened. She was carbo loading before a marathon and clearly was not changing her method.

She was rail thin, bordering ematiated.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Aug-14-20 at 10:27.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Fri, Aug-14-20, 10:40
Sniggle Sniggle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 250
 
Plan: General Low Carb
Stats: 205.2/194.6/185 Male 73.5
BF:
Progress: 52%
Location: West Virginia
Default

Interesting topic.

A couple years ago as I was training for MT Rainier I gave up low carb in the run up to the climb, because in my mind there was no way I could A) stay low carb during the climb and B) I equate carbs with energy reserves...wrongly.

So here I am today, once again low carbing to drive my weight below 200 and also training for a GoRuck event in early October. My plan had been to again stop low carbing the week of the event through the event, and then pick up again on the other side, after I had recovered. (The event will be from Friday night to Sunday morning, essentially 24 hours with a ruck on my back doing'work' over 2 nights, with a 6 hour break on Saturday).

This has me thinking....should I go into the event low carbing it? If so, what snacks/food would work to keep me fueled? What should I eat Saturday morning before/after I nap before the 2nd night of effort? Any suggestions would be great.

I still will probably eat a pizza and drink a beer when I get home from the event, before going to sleep for 12-16 hours. A man needs something to look forward to.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:58.


Copyright © 2000-2020 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.