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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 00:34
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
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Location: UK
Default We are taking action to get the British nation's health back on track

We are taking action to get the British nation's health back on track

If everyone who is overweight lost five pounds it could save the NHS over £100 million over the next five years, the Health Secretary writes

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politic...lth-back-track/

Quote:
Matt Hancock MP
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

Obesity is one of the greatest long term health challenges that we face as a country.

It not only puts a strain on our NHS and care system, but it also piles pressure on our bodies, making us more vulnerable to many diseases, including of course coronavirus.

The latest research shows that if you have a BMI of between 30 and 35 your risk of death from coronavirus goes up by at least a quarter.

And that nearly 8 per cent of critically ill patients with coronavirus in intensive care are morbidly obese compared at around 3 per cent of the country as a whole.

This deadly virus has given us a wake-up call about the need to tackle the stark inequalities in our nation’s health, and obesity is an urgent example of this.
We’ve already done lots of work on this front, like cutting sugar in soft drinks and giving extra support for the NHS work on diabetes.

But we know that we need to go further.

On Monday, we publish a new strategy setting out clearly how we will tackle obesity in England.

Our whole principle is to support people to make the healthiest choices for themselves and their families, and help protect the NHS.

So at its heart is better information: making sure everyone has the best possible information about the food that they enjoy, a big communications campaign about why obesity matters, and much more direct communication and support from your GP, who should see helping people tackle obesity in the same light as helping people tackle smoking.

So we are making it mandatory for large businesses, like restaurants and takeaways, with over 250 employees, to make clear how many calories are in the food they sell.

This will help people take responsibility for their health, and make healthy choices when they are eating away from home.

We also know that what we see on TV, and promoted in shops and supermarkets, can have a big impact on the food that we buy.

This is especially the case for children, where research shows that adverts can shape their preferences at a young age.

So we are banning the advertising of high fat, sugar and salt products before 9pm on TV and online.

Supermarkets have a part to play here too. I am sure that every parent has been pestered by their child to buy something unhealthy that they’ve seen at the checkout.

We will act to make sure that these products are not promoted in important locations or are included in promotions like buy one get one free.

This will make sure that there are more promotions for healthier products and encourage healthy eating.

Of course, this is a complex issue, and these measures are the beginning, not the end, of our work.

If everyone who is overweight lost five pounds it could save the NHS over £100 million over the next five years. And more importantly, given the link between obesity and coronavirus, losing weight could be lifesaving.

Taking serious action against obesity will be one of our biggest priorities over the months ahead.

So we can help everyone to live healthier lives and get this nation’s health back on track.




New Obesity Strategy unveiled as country urged to lose weight to beat coronavirus (COVID-19) and protect the NHS

New package of measures and "Better Health" campaign announced to help people lose weight.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/...protect-the-nhs

Quote:
  • Ban on TV and online adverts for food high in fat, sugar and salt before 9pm
  • End of deals like ‘buy one get one free’ on unhealthy food high in salt, sugar and fat
  • Calories to be displayed on menus to help people make healthier choices when eating out – while alcoholic drinks could soon have to list hidden ‘liquid calories’
  • New campaign to help people lose weight, get active and eat better after COVID-19 “wake-up call”

A raft of measures have been revealed as part of the Government’s new Obesity Strategy to get the nation fit and healthy, protect themselves against COVID-19 and protect the NHS.

Obesity is one of the biggest health crises the country faces. Almost two thirds (63%) of adults in England are overweight or living with obesity – and 1 in 3 children leave primary school overweight or obese, with obesity-related illnesses costing the NHS £6 billion a year.
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 03:03
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,205
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Fighting obesity isn’t nannying, it’s about social justice

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...stice-tb26r5ljx

Quote:
In recent months, a realisation of the link between obesity, its co-morbidities, and poor Covid-19 outcomes, has sparked a renewed interest in tackling Britain’s obesity crisis.

Reducing obesity levels is not only vital as we seek to minimise the impact of future waves of the pandemic, but it should also be considered a critical element of the prime minister’s “levelling up” agenda.

Of course, obesity is frequently an outcome of poor life chances – but it can also perpetuate them.

The economic impact of obesity cripples some of our communities and tackling it is therefore a matter of social justice. Obesity rates among the most deprived 10 per cent of the population are more than twice that of the least deprived 10 per cent, and the gap in prevalence between rich and poor is tragically still growing.

The constituency I represent as its MP in many ways epitomises the national picture. I can travel from one area – a pocket of coastal deprivation and the poorest ward in Wales, where obesity and poor health goes hand in hand with economic inactivity and high premature death rates – to another area just several miles away where the average Body Mass Index is markedly lower, and life expectancy and income levels are significantly higher. For me, this inequality within a single constituency is unacceptable.

The harsh truth is that obesity is strongly associated with a number of serious health conditions, including many leading causes of death. It is also associated with poorer mental health outcomes and reduced quality of life. Being overweight can exert a tough emotional toll, from bullying at school to the pain of life-long judgmental attitudes and stigma.

The majority of adults in the UK are now overweight and shockingly, the most common reason for children aged five to nine being admitted to hospital is for sugar-related tooth extractions. Obesity saddles the NHS with an annual bill of several billion pounds a year and its overall cost to wider society is estimated to be £27 billion.

Many efforts have been made to turn the tide on obesity, but it should now be clear to all that these have not been sufficiently bold. Securing the appreciable progress that we so desperately need will mean convincing some that public health intervention and the “nanny state” are not always synonymous.

Key tenets of UK Conservatism, which I share, are self-responsibility, alongside freedom and choice. When it comes to obesity however, these principles need to be applied and understood in the context of the challenges posed by the modern Western world. As a GP, any day’s work reinforces to me that we live within a society where, for some, freedom to make the right choices is severely constrained.

With supermarkets packed with temptingly-priced high fat, sugar and salt products, takeaways on every street corner, bountiful coffee shops serving syrup-laden “flavoured drinks”, pubs and bars offering large 200 kcal-plus glasses of wine, and a culture which normalises these things on a day-to-day basis, it is far too easy for all of us to consume more calories than our sedentary lifestyles can withstand.

While some may navigate this environment unscathed, making healthy choices has become increasingly difficult, and more so in poorer communities. Whether we are under enormous stresses and strains from other aspects of our life, or fighting to feed a family on a tight budget and with limited time, the long-term health outcomes of what we eat and drink may not always be our top concern. For me, the measures we need to implement are not about taking away choice, but about the government helping to rebalance the playing field in favour of healthier options, for the benefit of all.

When he was mayor of London, Boris Johnson was ahead of the government on obesity policy. It is to be hoped that if anything positive is to come of his recent gruelling experience of Covid-19, it will be that it helps make this year a turning point in the battle against obesity, thereby creating a brighter future for tens of millions of British people.

Dr James Davies is the Conservative MP for the Vale of Clwyd and vice-chairman of the all-party group on obesity

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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 04:31
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Major new campaign encourages millions to lose weight and cut COVID-19 risk

A new national campaign is under way to encourage millions of adults to kick start their health and reduce their risk of serious illness, including COVID-19.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/...t-covid-19-risk

Quote:
Public Health England (PHE) launches the Better Health campaign to support people to live healthier lives and reduce their risk of serious illness, including COVID-19.

Growing evidence suggests that being obese or excessively overweight puts people at greater risk of serious illness or death from COVID-19.

Nation urged to work towards a healthier weight with the support of free tools and apps to help people eat better, lose weight and get active.

The campaign will be targeted at groups most affected by obesity and is supported by a coalition of partners, including those providing weight management services.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 05:17
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
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Plan: Protein Power/Atkins
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Default

It is a good idea for people to realize that there is a relationship between obesity and comorbidity.

But just how well informed is the government on what causes obesity? And are their proposals going to produce results?

If the UK follows the same dietary standards as Americans are told to follow, based upon faulty evidence, there will be no change in the % of obese.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 05:56
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Posts: 1,495
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Progress: 50%
Default

This sounds good, right?


Quote:
So at its heart is better information: making sure everyone has the best possible information about the food that they enjoy, a big communications campaign about why obesity matters, and much more direct communication and support from your GP, who should see helping people tackle obesity in the same light as helping people tackle smoking.




But of course this is how they're planning to accomplish this:


Quote:
So we are making it mandatory for large businesses, like restaurants and takeaways, with over 250 employees, to make clear how many calories are in the food they sell.




Quote:
We also know that what we see on TV, and promoted in shops and supermarkets, can have a big impact on the food that we buy.

This is especially the case for children, where research shows that adverts can shape their preferences at a young age.

So we are banning the advertising of high fat, sugar and salt products before 9pm on TV and online.




So primarily calories in/calories out.



Again.


Still.


Assuming this tactic results in any weight loss at all (for some people, it really doesn't), in the vast majority of cases, it will only result in hunger, frustration, a return to "normal" eating patterns, which most often ends in gaining back all lost weight, plus a few extra pounds.


I'm so sick of them barking up the wrong tree on absolutely every official recommendation related to diet. At least they mentioned sugar this time, and yes, many people are consuming way too many sweet sauces, desserts, and sugary drinks. But that completely ignores the fact that the dozen servings of starches they want you to eat each day converts to glucose and raise blood sugar faster than table sugar does, and that fruit and juices are just more sugar. I'm sure those are considered to be perfectly fine though, especially when blessed by the glowing aura of a gram or two of fiber per serving.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 08:48
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 14,853
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 45%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

ITS A GOOD START.
Hopefully this leads to more changes. Getting craps food off the plate is a good start. A push toward real food is important. As long as the " not low carb" mantra gets promoted, this is real change.

Including calories in meals can really wake up the ignorant to the 1000 calorie burger. However Im not fir burdening the restaurant business. IT shifts the responsibility from government to teach healthy options.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 08:51
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Posts: 4,119
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benay
If the UK follows the same dietary standards as Americans are told to follow, based upon faulty evidence, there will be no change in the % of obese.
Oh, there will be a change - an INCREASE in obesity.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 09:17
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,493
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
Oh, there will be a change - an INCREASE in obesity.

Agreed. Simply more of the same with no recognition of the real root cause. Sometimes taking the wrong actions can leave one with the sensation that something is being accomplished, so we quickly comply with taking actions that are ineffective and can actually make things worse. Let's dispense with this behavior, as this is how we got the food pyramid in the first place. Remember, politicians didn't have the luxury of time to test whether going low fat was sound science, people were dying. So, taking action resulted in an increasing obesity, T2D, CVD, and cancer epidemics that today are bankrupting governments and killing massive numbers of people.

There is a better way, but with people looking to elected officials to lead them out of the wilderness, it will be a long wait.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 09:29
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,205
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Dr Aseem Malhotra speaking on BBC News this morning, I'm hoping the link will work here:

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?st...JCZxVp&d=n&vh=i
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 09:36
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 11,591
 
Plan: LC/DrWestman/P:E/DDF
Stats: 225/175/168 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/30%/25%
Progress: 88%
Location: NC
Default

And it truly helps to have the Prime Minister lead by example.

'I was too fat,' Boris Johnson says in UK launch to tackle obesity

Boris Johnson, the UK Prime Minister, has said in a video posted to his official Twitter account that he was "way overweight" when he was admitted to intensive care earlier this year after becoming infected with Covid-19.



https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/uk/b...intl/index.html
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Jul-27-20, 09:54
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,554
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/185/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: Texas
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If everyone lost five pounds it would save millions in health costs? NOT.
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  #12   ^
Old Tue, Jul-28-20, 00:04
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Ambulo Ambulo is offline
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Posts: 1,434
 
Plan: No GS, IF
Stats: 150/131/120 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 63%
Location: the North, England
Default

I suspect it will just be the usual garbage guidelines and as a "normal" BMI person who works to be that way I will be paying tax unfairly on my butter, bacon and lamb chops.
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  #13   ^
Old Tue, Jul-28-20, 00:12
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 23,205
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 217/180/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 65%
Location: UK
Default

Dr Aseem Malhotra Explains How The New Obesity Strategy Needs To Tackle The Root Cause

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgK...eature=youtu.be
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Jul-28-20, 06:34
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 14,853
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/230/200 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 45%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
And it truly helps to have the Prime Minister lead by example.

'I was too fat,' Boris Johnson says in UK launch to tackle obesity

Boris Johnson, the UK Prime Minister, has said in a video posted to his official Twitter account that he was "way overweight" when he was admitted to intensive care earlier this year after becoming infected with Covid-19.



https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/uk/b...intl/index.html


Great to have a top leader who has personal experience with a low carb diet leading the charge!!
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Jul-28-20, 06:35
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
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Posts: 1,495
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
If everyone lost five pounds it would save millions in health costs? NOT.



Certainly not a message that an anorexic needs to hear, that's for sure.

But really - 5 lbs? And what if that's not enough to improve EVERYONE's health enough to save that 100 million. That's what they project the savings would be over 5 years.

So let's do the math...

That means they expect to save 20 million/year, which still sounds somewhat impressive.

But hold on - England has a population of around 53.5 million people.

So a savings of 20 million divided by the population of 53.5 million amounts to an annual savings for the NHS of... TA-DA! approximately 37 pence per person, per year.

Well! I must say, I'm certainly impressed with how much that 5 lb weight loss will save in each person's health care costs, as long as EVERYONE loses 5 lbs.





Sarcasm aside...

I genuinely hope that they heed Dr Maholtra's common sense recommendations.

The food industry guy - I sympathize with him. He's right that the food production industry has been expected (and applauded) for continuing to put themselves in harm's way to keep the nation fed during the pandemic. He's also right that BOGO deals work best with items that have a long shelf life, and if you switch BOGO deals to perishable foods, are you really going to be able to eat all that before it goes bad? I understand him doing whatever he can to defend the processed food industry too - he's trying to preserve the livelihoods of a tremendous number of employees in that industry.

The time has come for a huge change in the processed food industry though, mostly starting with asking the question - what can they produce that still has a reasonably long shelf life, uses an absolute minimum number of ingredients (preferably 5 or less). He's understandably confused about what else they can do, because the recommendations in the article focused on cutting back on fats and calories (and oh yes, sugar and salt), mentioning the fact that those recommendations would inherently exclude olive oil and bacon.

I suspect that if he works with Dr Maholtra (and others who truly understand nutritional and metabolic issues), together they could come up with quite a few foods that would have a relatively long shelf life, some that are even shelf stable, which would be much better for the national waistline and health, and could greatly improve national health, while revolutionizing the processed food industry.

Somewhere along the line though, they need to get the national recommendations straightened out, stop demonizing fats (especially saturated animal fats and cholesterol) and salt, and put the blame where it really belongs - excess starches and sugars.
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