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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Oct-12-19, 01:30
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Does Botox work? Salmon is better, says Dr Nicholas Perricone

Quote:
Does Botox work? Salmon is better, says Dr Nicholas Perricone

Meet the US dermatologist who says you don’t need needles to stay looking youthful


He treats some of Hollywood’s most famous women and has a multimillion-pound skincare company with customers including Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston, Jennifer Lopez and Eva Mendes. But ask the celebrity dermatologist Dr Nicholas Perricone the secret to ageing well and he’ll tell you to start in your kitchen. He is strictly against Botox or fillers, or any injectables for that matter. The secret to good skin, he says, is mainly diet, ideally with a little help from good skin creams and supplements.

“I’m very anti-Botox,” he tells me. “People may say that with Botox you look ageless — no, you look like a space alien because you’re not using your face. If the muscle is paralysed it will atrophy. You may have no lines or wrinkles, but you don’t have convexities — the shape to your face that makes you look youthful.”

Central to Perricone’s approach is his belief that premature ageing is an inflammatory disease that occurs at a cellular level in the body, but which can be controlled by what we consume. Thus, he says, if you know what to eat there is a “facelift in your fridge” that will do far more for you than any cosmetic surgeon. His go-to youth-enhancing food is salmon, and his best-known prescription for smoother skin is a three-day blitz of intensive salmon eating: for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

He says that eating salmon two or even three times a day (the wild variety, ideally) provides DMAE, a compound found in oily fish that gives tone to the skin. It also provides the antioxidant astaxanthin and the essential fatty acids that help skin to appear supple and glowing.

“People say, ‘Why are you talking about food? Don’t you have a skincare company?’” he says, chuckling. Perricone MD, the company he founded in 1997, has global annual sales of more than $100 million. “But food is the most important factor,” he adds. “It’s about beauty from the inside out. If I follow my own advice for three days, I feel different.”

He prescribes 4-6oz of grilled salmon three times a day, with porridge and melon or berries at breakfast, a green salad or leafy greens and more melon or kiwi fruit at lunch, then the same for dinner, with steamed vegetables. A bedtime snack of an apple, turkey breast or hazelnuts, walnuts or almonds is allowed. Any form of sugar is strictly forbidden. The low-GI fruit — berries and cantaloupe melon — is designed to break sugar cravings gently. After this three-day salmon diet (some of his followers do it as much as once a month) Perricone advocates sticking to a low-GI diet full-time, introducing other forms of protein such as tofu, tuna, cod, trout, turkey and goat’s cheese for variety, although he still advocates eating salmon most days.

While Perricone’s eating plan resembles other low-GI or low-carb diets, his aim is not just to regulate blood sugar and reduce inflammation. Based around nutrigenomics — the branch of genetic research into the relationship between food and genes — he says it’s about “eating the right foods to trigger and manipulate the activation of good genes. Blueberries, for example, activate transcription factors [protein messengers in the cells that respond to different stimuli], which turn off inflammation and turn on the production of more than 100 anti-inflammatory proteins.”

I meet Perricone in the St Regis hotel on the Upper East Side of New York, not far from his former clinic, where he treated the city’s rich and famous, but which he closed a few years ago to focus on research. Now he sees a handful of VIPs privately. Aged 71, he is tanned, slick and handsome in a Savile Row suit. His skin is smooth, although not suspiciously so, without a trace of tweaked weirdness.

Perricone has written ten bestselling books. His first, The Wrinkle Cure, sold a million copies in two years. Today his ideas about inflammation are more widely accepted. In addition to a strict diet, Perricone also advises taking targeted nutritional supplements — namely omega-3, calcium, magnesium, more of the antioxidant astaxanthin and DMAE. Naturally he has his own range of pills that contain all of these — at £75 for a 30-day supply.

His face creams and serums don’t come cheap either — that’s because, he says, they don’t merely affect the skin at surface level, but also contain bioactive ingredients such as amines and DMAE that affect the skin at a cellular level and help to turn off inflammation. The brand’s top seller, Cold Plasma, is £129 for 30ml.

If you think that sounds expensive, Perricone has just launched his most expensive product yet: High Potency Plus Regenerating Growth Factor Concentrate, on sale for £500 for 59ml at Harrods. He says that this is because the ingredients, which include egg membrane and new second-generation amines called polyamines, cost $12,000 per 500g. But “it’s phenomenal — you can see the difference in 24 hours”, he claims.

I don’t have the budget to spend £500 on a skin cream, although many do. But on the morning of my 42nd birthday a tiny jar of the new serum arrives for me to try. And to be fair to Perricone, a few minutes after applying the serum my forehead, which I hadn’t even thought of as particularly lined, does appear noticeably tighter. And after three days of applying it, morning and night, my skin is glowing.

Perricone considers his creams to be a high-performing investment and says that his supplements too are helpful “if you can afford them”. But he adds that there’s plenty we can do to look younger without spending anything.

Reduce stress and sun exposure, don’t smoke, don’t drink to excess, get enough sleep, meditate, do yoga or pray, he says. “You can actually see people getting younger when they meditate.” He meditates for 30 minutes a day.

Perricone also advises to exercise moderately. “People think they have to go to the gym and work out like crazy, but after 30 minutes you use up your antioxidants and you go into a pro-inflammatory state, and then your stress hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline, kick in,” he says. “Doing anything over 30 to 45 minutes is pro-ageing.” Marathons, triathlons and Ironman challenges are definite no-nos.

Then there is the ageing effect of emotional stress. Perricone advocates dumping your partner if they’re not up to scratch. “Relationships are very anti-inflammatory when you’re in a good one,” he says with a smile.

“But nothing could be worse than being in a bad relationship. All that stress 24/7 — that’s definitely going to age you.”



https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...octor-gfmt52tsk
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Oct-12-19, 03:45
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Can't argue with the man And a salmon stretch appeals.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Oct-12-19, 06:57
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Years ago he had PBS program. He was sensible in his advice. I have one book I picked up at a book sale.

We only buy wild salmon. Yes, it is more money, but it is a far better nutritive value than farmed.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 02:53
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
We only buy wild salmon. Yes, it is more money, but it is a far better nutritive value than farmed.


Likewise, I look for wild salmon now, thanks to your advice!
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  #5   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 06:29
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
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I was just thinking this morning what else I could add to my quiche recipes. Already made bacon, and hamburger, so why not salmon? Will see how it works out later.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 07:04
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Saw a recipe for fish burgers the other day. no breading. salmon laid out on cutting board and herbs and spices and veg chopped and dumped on top of fillet then cut fish in half. one half coarse chop, the other fine chop. hand mix together, then divide into 4 portions and shaped into a burger.

wish i had paid more attention.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 08:19
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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I haven't checked other resources, but for those of us who don't like (or can't afford) salmon, this compares mackerel and salmon:
https://foodstruct.com/compare/fish...-salted-vs-fish

I'll check further, but my last mackerel cost less than $2 for a 15 oz can. I really don't care for any type of salmon except smoked.

Still, this is really good information to have. Thank you.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 09:13
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Dodger Dodger is online now
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I bet that salmon tastes much better than Botox.
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 09:19
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Did you read that when they inject Botox it basically causes atrophy which means the muscles stop working and can you just imagine if you lost muscles in your face?

I noticed myself that from chewing on the right side too much that the left side isn't getting as much exercise so I'm getting some wrinkles on the left. I just can't imagine doing that purposely...
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 10:37
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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lol....I purposely chew on both sides. Tough foods, like steaks and fibrous veg ie green beans, salad stuff, really give jaws a workout.

Bet canned mackerel is as good as salmon. Salmon is more popular and available. Not many eat canned fish ( except tuna) .

Any good recipes for canned mackerel??
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 11:00
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
lol....I purposely chew on both sides. Tough foods, like steaks and fibrous veg ie green beans, salad stuff, really give jaws a workout.

Bet canned mackerel is as good as salmon. Salmon is more popular and available. Not many eat canned fish ( except tuna) .

Any good recipes for canned mackerel??


Yes I try and chew on both sides but I have to think about it.

You know, now that you mention giving the jaws a workout it has occurred to me before that many people eat such soft food (again, no knife and fork), that they aren't using their facial/jaw muscles like they should.
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  #12   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 11:15
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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YUP!!!!#

Dr. Lin the dentist talks at length about the importance of chewing...starting when children are little and all thru our lives. Im betting that chewing also strengthened the jaw bone, the teeth and the gums that hold in the teeth.

And if we eat fish in soups, like whole fish bones and alll, then the collagens can really support the fine connections in our skin, connective tissue and such.

Dr axe , in a promo, said collagen represents 3O% of our daily protein needs. Made me think. 30% THAT IS BIG. We as a society dont have a pot of stew warming on the stove anymore. A pot hanging over the fire was the norm in generations past.

I tend to have a pot of turkey soup simmering during winter months....

How with everyone working is good food like thus available?? Its not.
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 11:37
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is online now
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I was talking to DD2 the other day about why it's good to use the whole chicken because of all of the cologne but she is like so many who only wants to use the breasts, (boneless skinless). She was telling me about cooking chicken and dumplings. She said there's something about the bones that turn her off, even the bones in a drumstick. IDK why, but it's a mental thing she said.
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 12:59
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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Wanting good health got me over many humps...lol . Up to her now. Not much else you can do. Change is hard.

Seems like a fenetation of eating nuggets and not bone in real meat has affected choices. It is also apparent change takes place when the stakes are high....like poor health. A human thing.

I remember a friend sharing a recipe on canning fish. It makes the bones very soft and very edible.
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  #15   ^
Old Sun, Oct-13-19, 14:08
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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Plan: Atkins 72~Induction
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That's another thing about mackerel. The bones are soft and IN the can inside the fish body. I really enjoy it. Not as mushy as canned tuna.

I keep it simple. Because mackerel is so fatty, lemon juice brightens it up and fresh cut pico de gallo makes it feel fresh. You can always add mayo, too.

As for chewing, I can't do much on either side. Teeth are gone, but one side I can't chew on at all. I'll just have to settle for what I've got.
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