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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Oct-08-19, 20:33
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
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Location: Massachusetts
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proteins are not affected by fermenting. fernenting uses the lactose.

a1,a2genes are based by cattle variety. easy to loom up. Holsteins are a1, most of the smaller rarer breeds are a2, as well as sheep and goats.

this is different that what they eat. how organic , how grassfed has no relation to sensitivities to the a2-a1proteins.

Just as those that are lactose intolerant is different than sensitivity to the proteins.

Im good with kerrygold cheeses and butter and look for french, german and italian cheeses for their grassfed methods. may not be 100% grass fed but more likely than US holsteins that are almost never put out to graze as that reduces production.
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  #17   ^
Old Wed, Oct-09-19, 06:46
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
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Location: NE WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
bonnie said

This article was only a beneficial peice on cheeses. A complete understanding of cheeses and dairy would fill a tome.


Oh, I know - I was just venting. I used to write cooking articles for the local paper - only rarely did I give more than 1 side. I thought I knew what healthful food was (this was before LC) & could only give the information I knew.

Thanks for the heads-up about the cheese tariff. Think I'll pick up some extra.
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  #18   ^
Old Wed, Oct-09-19, 08:18
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 12,131
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
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You get to vent. Cheese and dairy is a real problem for a growing number.

I wish articles were well rounded. They just are not. Its the way it is.

Ate a chunk of Ste Andre triple creme last night! Heavenly!
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  #19   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 02:53
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 11,896
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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Progress: 139%
Location: USA
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I have found cheese to be another of those foods where the higher cost of the better stuff really is offset by how I am satisfied with smaller amounts.
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  #20   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 03:24
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
Posts: 1,290
 
Plan: Atkins & IF / TRE
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 97%
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Dr. Miriam Kalamian like cheese: The keto diet - What can I eat?..., with a few stipulations.
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  #21   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 09:18
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,107
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
We posted at the same time. I have the same problem with dairy proteins. Even people who aren't allergic or intolerant may react to the morphine-like substance in the casein that causes them to binge on cheese and other foods. I carried 15 lbs of inflammation until I gave up dairy proteins. Over 30 years on various diets I could never lose those last 15 lbs until I gave up dairy proteins, which I loved. Whenever I see adults with dark circles around their eyes and puffy-looking "baby" fat, I think - try giving up dairy protein. I can use ghee and small amounts of butter.

I had symptoms as a baby (65 yrs ago), but it was assumed to be lactose intolerance and I was put on soy formula, and it was assumed that babies "grew out of it" by age 2 when I was given cow milk again. It is possible that A1 cows milk in North America is worse than A2 milk available in Europe & elsewhere.

Doctors are finally starting to learn that cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA), is a common food allergy (or dairy allergy). While most babies with CMPA experience digestive problems (such as diarrhea, vomiting, constipation and reflux), skin problems (such as hives and eczema), respiratory symptoms (such as persistent cough and wheezing) and other more general allergy symptoms (for example, tiredness, problems sleeping, runny nose, itchy eyes & ear aches) can also occur.

I don't think I ever grew out of it, I just thought hives, wheezing, tiredness, stuffed up nose, aches & pains were "normal". Though our chorus master told us in the 1970s to avoid milk products before concerts to avoid excess phlegm. One of my main reasons to try avoiding casein was to get rid of daily Sudafed & Claritan to be able to breathe. Now I need them only a couple of days a year.

I can relate. Eczema is the result of me eating certain cheeses like my favorite blue cheeses especially. If I go dairy free, eczema disappears. I never drink milk, have abolished yogurt, but I enjoy cheese and can consume only occasionally unless I want to get dry cracks on my fingers. It's my reality, and I believe I've always had this. It's what likely caused my perceived sinus problems when I was a kid. My son and daughter have this as well. Thanks for the CMPA reference. I'll learn more about this.
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 11:11
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
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for what its worth....
Years ago now I read an autobiography that has forever left its mark on my thoughts about dairy.

This woman wrote about her grandmother. How she was the village healer and the writer as a young girl during WWI learned much in rural Lithuania.

Her grandmother could heal many ills, including gangrene. Amazing in a time before antibiotics. She handled many ills during wartime when razorwire was everywhere.

She depended on raw milk products as treatments. But not as food. Rather bandages were soaked in milk and wrapped on the affected area. After treatment, wraps were washed and hung to dry in the sun. I cant remember for sure, but cows milk comes to mind. This would be grassfed, local breeds, usually small statured cows.

I often think of this learned woman, and her cautionary word that milk is not for people. I wish I could jump back in time and learn why, or at least learn what worked, even if the why is elusive.

Bottom line. She started me questioning the push to feed milk to children, and that dairy is not for everyone. And be on the lookout for health problems fueled by dairy products.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Thu, Oct-10-19 at 11:16.
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 12:26
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
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Location: Texas
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Yes Arielle, my mother from France always told me she didn't understand the push in the US to make adults drink milk.. She would say that in France only babies drank milk.
The adults eat cheese or cream in the coffee.
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  #24   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 12:35
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
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Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Yes Arielle, my mother from France always told me she didn't understand the push in the US to make adults drink milk.. She would say that in France only babies drank milk.
The adults eat cheese or cream in the coffee.
This is true in most of the world. It is Dairy marketers and lobbies in the US and Canada that push milk on people over 2 years old.
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  #25   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 12:47
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
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"Got milk?"
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  #26   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 15:04
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I can relate. Eczema is the result of me eating certain cheeses like my favorite blue cheeses especially. If I go dairy free, eczema disappears. I never drink milk, have abolished yogurt, but I enjoy cheese and can consume only occasionally unless I want to get dry cracks on my fingers. It's my reality, and I believe I've always had this. It's what likely caused my perceived sinus problems when I was a kid. My son and daughter have this as well. Thanks for the CMPA reference. I'll learn more about this.

Related to eczema (but not milk products): for me sodium laurel sulfate that's found in cleaning products (toothpaste, shampoo, dish soap, lotions...) caused finger cracks and itchy red spots whenever the weather got cold. I thought it was just an inevitable part of winter weather until I read someplace about sensitivity to this type of chemical, switched products and resolved the problem. The above people clearly have a milk-related cause. Adding my observation here in case it helps further reduce eczema for anyone or if searching for additional possible triggers, as I'd never have guessed this one before reading that article about it.
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 15:12
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 11,896
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
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Progress: 139%
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Related to eczema (but not milk products): for me sodium laurel sulfate that's found in cleaning products (toothpaste, shampoo, dish soap, lotions...) caused finger cracks and itchy red spots whenever the weather got cold.


I went total Castile and hemp soap, even for shampoo, then a vinegar rinse. Not constantly drying out my skin with foamy engine degreaser turned out to solve skin irritation I didn't know I had.
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 16:02
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,107
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Related to eczema (but not milk products): for me sodium laurel sulfate that's found in cleaning products (toothpaste, shampoo, dish soap, lotions...) caused finger cracks and itchy red spots whenever the weather got cold. I thought it was just an inevitable part of winter weather until I read someplace about sensitivity to this type of chemical, switched products and resolved the problem. The above people clearly have a milk-related cause. Adding my observation here in case it helps further reduce eczema for anyone or if searching for additional possible triggers, as I'd never have guessed this one before reading that article about it.

Thanks, dairy elimination completely clears any eczema for me. While certain soaps can worsen an existing condition, elimination of dairy prevents it. I tried Castile soap to see if this helped, and it was great when I had eliminated dairy. Didn't help at all when I consumed dairy. I do have to be careful with certain soaps, especially fragrant dish soaps.
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  #29   ^
Old Thu, Oct-10-19, 16:32
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 12,131
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
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For my son, it seemed to be the infant formula and the whole milk that triggered exema. Pediatrition has us change to Dove soap instead of Ivory. Looking back, Im not sure what worked to eliminate my son's ecxema. These last few years he consumes yogurt nearly everyday and cheeses. Sometimes whole milk, though that is usually grassfed or organic.

Im no longer convinced babies should be given formula.... it is handed out like candy on maternity wards to unsuspecting new mothers.
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  #30   ^
Old Fri, Oct-11-19, 06:52
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
Posts: 1,290
 
Plan: Atkins & IF / TRE
Stats: 000/014.5/015 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 97%
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When gouda and parmesean blocks are in the house I invariably find myself eating too much at a time. Nowadays, I like having sliced pound servings of cheddar - sliced for quiche and cheeseburger pie and LC cheese bread recipes.
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